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Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong ... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 10,319 items from Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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No title [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

The election of one councillor for the East Riding of the Shire of Avon ; will take place on Thursday next, the candidates nominated being the re tiring councillor, Mr R. Lee, and Mr George Kirkbam. The poll will be taken at the Shire Hall, Stratford, Mechanics' Institute, Briagoloug, and booth near Blennerhasset's, Meerlieu. The poll will open at 8 a.m. and close at 4 p.m. Next mail for -the United Kingdom and Foreign countries, per R.M.S. Osterly, will close at the Stratford post office on Wednesday, August 21 at 3.15 p.m. Entries for the billiard tournament 1 at the Mechanics, will close on Monday next. The woather during the past week has been all that could be desired ? fine balmy days, with occasional light showers of rain. During the period mentioned 34 points of«rain has been registered. A handsome monument has re cently been erected in the Nuntin ; Cemetery to the order of the relatives of the late Mr Thomas and Mrs Mary Chandler. The workmanship is of a particularly high s...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KING SOLOMON AND THE BEES [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

' Kixc Solomon --asd the Bees By W. Stothers, Grade VII. One day when King Solomon was on his throne the queen of Sheba came up to him with a Sower that grows and a wreath of the best artificial .flowers - jhe.could^et. . She -had. heard wliat' a wise man' he was and she thought he would guess which flowers were natural, he was puzzled for a while and then 'be saw a swarm of bees- at the window, and all he said was, ' Open the Window,' The window was opened and the bees flew to the- flowers in Sheba's hand and they never touched the imitation ones and so he told the difference between them. The queen amazed at what she bad seen* returned to tell her people of the wonderful man. This tale tells us that we can iearn wisdom from bees.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE PRINCESS IN THE TOWER. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

The Princess in the Tower. By Kathleen Galway, Grade VII. The Tower of London was once used as a prison.. It had thick walls and strong doors, aed those who were placed inside did not have any hope of escaping. Many years ago, two little princes were shiat up in the tower. They had done nothing wrong but they had a cruel uncle named Richard who wanted to ba kisg of England. Richard knew that he coald not be king, for one of these little boys was Edward the Fifth, and the crown was his. Their prison was a dark cold room and the windows were so high that they could not look out. Still, the boys did not think, that their nncle was so wicked as. to do them any harm. They did not know that Richard had killed many men, and that he was also trying to find someone who would pntthem to death. Then Richard soon fonnd two, bad men. who did not mind what they done, so long as they were paid for it. These two men went to the tower one night and found the princes fast asleep and they killed them ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

' ' I THOUGHT HE WOULD BREAK A BLOOD VESSEL.' ' My little boy had a croupy cough for some time,' writes Mrs. E. E. Bull, Beaumont-street, Hamilton, 'Newcastle, N.S.W. ' He would cough so long that I thought he would break a blood vessel. I, was really frightened for him, because he is not-stroDg, and continual coughing made his chest quite sore. After trying many remedies without any improvement, I gave him Dr. Sheldon's New Discovery. The first dose stopped the coughing, and in a week's time he was cured.'T Ob tainable from M. Mcllroy, Stratford and Briagolong, DON'T WAIT TILL TO MORROW ! It's Ubtle colds that grow into big colds, the big colds that end iu consumption and death. Don't wait till to-morrow to i treat the little colds, for one dose of Dr. Sheldon's Kew -Discovery for Coughs and j Colds will break up a cold if taken at the J beginning. Dr. Sheldon's New Dis covery is a safe and a never-failiug remedy. Price, Is. 6d, and 3s. Obtain able from M. Mcllroy, Stratford and Br...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BIRDS THAT LIVE IN WATER. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Birds That Live is Water. By Lizzie Curran, Grade IV. 1 he duck has not a sharp beak like the magpie because it does 110 *? want to pick up hard things, such as nuts or any other hard things as hard as nuts. Their feet are webbed so that they can swin easily. It has no hands, and that is why its feet are almost at the back of it. It is of great use to us, it kills the grubs and many oilier harmful insects. There are many other birds like /'the duck. All the birds that live in wetter, swans, geese, divert, and seitgulls have webbed feet to enable them to swim.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ABOUT MEN. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

ABOUT MEN. « No man ever distinguished himself who could not bear to be laughed at. Men have possibly as much vanity as women, though of another kind. Men and women seldom agree on the merits of a woman; their inter ests are of too different a kind.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Just Dissolved. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Just Dissolved. 'So you broke your engagement I with Miss Spensive?' ; 'No, I didn't break it.' I 'Oh, she broke it?' j 'No, she didn't break it.' \ I 'But it is broken?' 1 'Yes; she told me what her clothing cost and I told her what my income was; then our engagement sagged in the middle and gently dissolved.' | First Hen: What a ridiculously ' giddy creature that young Miss Dork ing is. Second Hen: Oh, she's young yet. Wait till she has known the sorrow of sitting for three weeks on a china egg and two door-knobs — she'll sober down then. | Some reserve is a debt to prudence I and simplicity of conversation are a , debt to good nature. ' Pin your faith to first gueBses- and | second thoughts. He is a failure who sneers at sue I cess. ^ Over fifty tons of railway tickets 1 are issued in a year by one English I railway company. A well-known County Court judge i tells a story about the crossexamina tion of a bad-tempered woman in his i court. She was an Amazonian per-f I son. Her hus...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VERY LATEST THEOLOGY. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

. VERY LATEST THEOLOGY. | At the annual Scripture examina tion in a Sunday-school the following were some of the written answers to questions: — 'Saul Avas a man who was ordered go and kill all the Roman Catherlics he could. While he was on his jour ney to find the Catherlics he was stoned. A light from heaven knocked him down.' I 'Cornelius was one of the men to stone Stephen. He could not through the stones hard enough, so he took off his coat.' 'Ruth was a hard-working Lady. When she was working in the corn fields the owner was pleased and said she could eat with the other Ladies.' 'Zacharius was a priest. He was swinging- the innocents in the tem ple.' ?

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HIS BOY. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

HiS BOY. j 'I'm awfully worried about my boy. I can't get him to take an interest in anything that I'm interested in, any more.' 'I suppose you have considered the advisability, of trying to be a chum to him?' 'Yes, that has always been my in tention. I agree with those who think that a good many of the boys who go wrong do so because they get no sympathy from their, fathers and have to look for companionship away trom home. The youngster and I used to get on together very well, but lately there seems to be a gulf between us.' . 'Are you interested in football? 'No. I think the game ought to be abolished. I used to be one of the simpletons who went to games, and I yipped and howled myself hoarse, along with the rest of them, but I've quit it.' 'How old is your boy?' 'He'll soon be 15.' 'Does he ever go to picture shows or anything like that?' 'Yes, and it worries me a good deal. He seems to think much more of such things than he ought to.' 'You never cared for anything of that kind ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
All Busy Minding. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

All Busy Minding. Tlit gardener minds his peas, The billiard-marker minds 'his cues, The sexton minds his keys and pews, While we all mind our P's and Q's. Artist: Have you noticed that long hair makes a man look intellectual? His Friend: Well, I've seen wives i tiinlr tliotYi nff +Viaii« lillohanH'e I when it made them look foolish. Bill: Have you done any research work? Jill: Have I? Well, say, I've looked for this same collar-button I'm wear ing now at least fifty times. 'I; met Dunkey to-day for the first time for years. He hasn't changed much.' 'Oh, he hasn't changed at all, but lie doesn't seem to realise it.' j 'How do you mean?' | 'Oh, he's for ever talking about what a fool he used to be.',' You should put your property in your wife's name before starting out to heat the other fellow at his own game. ? _ _ ... _ /' J ' ! ' -_

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PILLARS OF FIRE. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

PILLARS OF FIRE. A' remarkable tragedy occurred in Dublin last year. A workman named Thomas Dunwoody was engaged in repairing the roof of a tenement, and in the course of the work had to use tar. By the direction of the landlord, his employer, he asked and obtained permission of the tenant of one of the rooms to put a bucket of tar on the fire in order to heat it. In the room at the time was the tenant. Mrs. O'Toole, and her child, and a neigh bor, Mrs. Lagrane, and her baby of four months. Not being properly attended to, the tar boiled over and flowed into the fire, and the bucket became a flaming cauldron. Dunwoody tried to quench it with water; but that only made matters worse, for the flaming tar was carried on the water along the floor. He then seized the bucket and carried it across the floor to the door; but by then his hands were so severe ly burnt that he was obliged to drop it. The door and the doorposts quickly caught the flames, and the two wo men, each picking up their ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE LIFE OF A STABLE-BOY. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

THE LIFE OF A STABLE-BOY. Mostly, Btable-boys — who later be | come jockeys and still later 'muckers out' when the scale declares them to be too weighty to wear colors — do not spring from upper-ten families. Often they boast of the humblest- parentage. Hence, the stable-boy aspires to no high ideal in the matter of recreation and scholastic achievement. He gets up before daylight, and his forenoon spell — between 10 a.m. and 12 noon — is generally spent in sleeping. Per haps, if he is not too tired he reads a novel of the 'Deadwood Dick' nat tern, indulges in discussion with oth er lads on weights, performances, or racing possibilities and results. May be, he joins the others in a game of cards for wax matches. After lunch the b6ys 'do tack' on' certain days. That means cleaning saddles and saddle mountings, bri dles,. etc. Usually, 'no man is a better harness-cleaner than the one who has served his time in a racing stable; for there is always a measure of riv alry between boys in ...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JAPAN'S FEAST OF BANNERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

JAPAN'S FEAST OF BANNERS. The -Japanese holiday in . honor of male children, known as Noborino Sekku, is celebrated on the fifth day of the fifth month, which in the Euro peanised calendar of Japan is new May 5. On every house that can boast of a male child is affixed a pole of bam boo, and floating tnerefrom are one or more gaudy fish made of paper. The exact number is determined by the number of boys in the household. The wind, blowing into the mouths of the fish, inflates them and makes them writhe and wriggle with a curiously lifelike motion. The fish are supposed to be carp, the carp in Japan being recognised as the symbol of health and long life. Other staffs support paper pennons of every color, while banners blazoned with heraldic devices float iu the wind. Boys of all ages appear in the streets in gala attire, some having lit tle sabres in their belts, some bear ing on their shoulders huge swords of wood, gaily' painted and decora ted, and others -carrying miniature banners...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Great Expectations. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Great Expectations. Willie: Make a noise like a frog, uncle. Uncle: Why? Willie: 'Cause when i ask daddy for anything lie says 'Wait till your uncle croaks!'

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Heady Legislation. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Heady Legislation. The Chinese prototype of the Amer ican Anti-Trust Law is beautifully brief and simple.- It contains but four paragraphs, which are as follow: — 'Those who deal with merchants un fairly are to be beheaded.' 'Those who interrupt commerce are to be beheaded.' 'Those who attempt to close the markts are to be beheaded.' 'Those who maintain the prosperity .of commerce are to be rewarded.'

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Surprise Too Great. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Surprise Too Great-. 'Sammy,' said his mean uncle, 'how would you feel if , I were to give you a penny?' 'I think,' replied Sammy, 'that I should feel a little faint at first, but I'd try to get over it.' '

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
His Father's Voice. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

His Father's Voice. ? The gardener, who was busy trim- _ ming up his flower-beds, was inter- ' rupted by his master's little fiveyear old son, who was following his father | down the garden. Looking up, the gardener said: | 'Well, Johnny, what were you cry ing for just now?' 'I was not crying,' observed the lit- ' tie one. I 'Then it was, something remarkably ? like it,' continued the gardener. 'I know.' said the little chap, with . a bright look in his eyes. 'It was j pa singing.' Naturally enough 'pa' is more care- 1 ful where he exercises his voice i now.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STORIES OF PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

STORIES OF PLACES. ! At the corner of the Via Stabin and the Vicolo di Mercurio in Pompeii is 'The House of the Laocoon,' which was a complete miller's and baker's es tablishment, containing grinding mills j made of Vesuvian lava stone and a large oven for baking. It was from this oven that the loaves of bread now j shown in the Naples museum were taken. By the side of the oven is a lead boiler in an excellent state of preservation, xiie uuuer was neaxeu i with charcoal, the hot water being | drawn off by means of a bronze tap. j i This points to the fact that the dough : was kneaded with warm water. Char- | coal was generally used for heating and cooking purposes, though lately some excavations in Belgium prove that the use of coal was known to the Romans. The rooms were heated by means of a brazier, exactly the same as the 'braciere' used by the Italians to-day. 'Washing-day, or rather washing week, is so important a period in the Balkan region that all family and so cial obligati...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Excellent Reasons. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

Excellent Reasons. ! The grubby-looking man stood in. the doorway, with determination on i every line of his unshaven counten ance. The housewife who faced him was equally determined. 'Yes, madam,' said the shabby man; 'the guv'nor ses to me: 'Go and git Mr. Jones' dress-suit to be clean ed and pressed. The lady'll give it to yer.' The guv'nor's a tailor, you see, mum.' 'Oh!' replied the lady. 'And did you see Mr. Jones?' 'I did, mum,' came the answer, 'wiv me own eyes. He ses: 'The lady'll know. I lef! a message at , 'ome.' ' Plainly, Mrs., Jones was perplexed. The trickster felt lie had nearly achieved his object. The lady's reply finally crushed him, 'however. I 'Well,' she answered, 'all I can say is that Mr. Jones never had a dress-suit, and for the last five years he's been in Canada!' j Then the grubby man bolted.

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TIGHT NECK-BANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Stratford Sentinel and Briagolong Express — 16 August 1912

TIGHT NECK-BANDS. In all first-aid instruction the first thing one is told to do in cases of fainting or convulsions is to loosen the clothing; but it seems not to have occurred to anyone to suggest that some of these cases might havi been prevented had the clothing never been tight. Reference is not here made to the corset particularly, for tight-lacing has been so often de nounced that its evils are well known. The present criticism is directed against tight neckwear. In this regard -men are as often at fault as women — in summer indeed niore often. Actual compression of the windpipe is not the only way in which death by strangulation may be caused. The immediate cause may be congestion of the brain and per haps apoplexy, the result of cutting off the return circulation of the blood in the veins of the neck. But a man need not die in order to experience the evil effects of tight collars; the bad effects come much sooner and much more readily than death. Many persons suffer from mo...

Publication Title: Stratford Sentinel And Briagolong Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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