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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ABOUT ROOSEVELT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

ABOUT ROOSEVELT. President Roosevelt is giving sittings to the great Russian portrait painter, M. Constantine Makovsky, who was introduced to Washington society at a reception given to him and his wife by Count Cassini, the Russian Ambassador, early in the month. By a curious coincidence that yet more famous Russian, Verestchagin, is en- gaged upon a large canvas depicting Mr. Roose- velt in the assault upon San Juan Hill, in the Spanish-American war. In answer to an inquiry from the Rev. Dr. Buckley, editor of the "Christian Advocate," President Roosevelt says that his name is to be pronounced in three syllables, the first as in "rose." Thus the name is, spelt phonetically, "Roz-e-velt." This ought to settle the matter.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A MISOGYNIST! [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A MISOGYNIST!   Kitchener's dislike to women even extends to his own relations. When he was last in London, one of them wired to him from Paris her desire to see him. His reply was concise and economi- cal, and consisted of one word, "Why?" In town his evenings are spent in the society of three old ladies, faithful friends of his boyhood, the only representatives of "the sex" whom he is known to honor with his company. There is a certain irony in the fact that they are, after all, women, and that he voluntarily spends his leisure hours with them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICAN SOCIETY WEDDING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

AMERICAN SOCIETY WEDDING.     The wedding of the American Secretary of State's daughter, Miss Helen Hay, to Mr. Payne Whitney, one of Mr. W. C. Whitney's younger sons will take place in Washington early in the new year. There will be fully 500 invitations for the ceremony. The guests at the breakfast, however, will include only the President and Mrs. Roosevelt, besides the immediate relatives of the bride and groom.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THINGS WORTH KNOWING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THINGS WORTH KNOWING.   —♦— A man is generally at his heaviest in his for- tieth year. More people have died from colds than were ever killed in battle.   There is one titled person to every hundred commoners in Russia. A shipyard at Ominato, Japan, still in opera- tion, was established 1900 years ago. There are 130,000,000 people on the face of the globe who don't know what soap is. The ordinary rate of the Thames current is 180ft. a minute; that of the Rhine 540ft.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Caricaturists Caricature Themselves. SOME FAMOUS ARTISTS DRAW THEIR OWN PORTRAITS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

Caricaturists Caricature Themselves.   —♦— SOME FAMOUS ARTISTS DRAW THEIR OWN PORTRAITS. "O, wad some power the giftie gie us, to see oursels as others see us." Caricaturists are professional "others." They see people as people never see themselves—except, perhaps, when they patronise that weird peep-show known as the "distorting mirror." The English caricaturist is never unkind to be clever. He handles his "victims" with invari- able gentleness, often- times with sympathy, as if he regrets that duty compels him to advertise their foibles to the world. More than one promi- nent statesman has con- fessed to a liking for caricaturists and their attentions, much in the same way as one might find some modified plea- sure in having a tooth extracted, provided the dentist were skilful and tender enough. But however resigned the majority of the caricaturist's subjects may be, they will no doubt find some satis- faction in seeing on this page how the tables have been turned on ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECKLESS GAMBLING. POLISH COUNT LOSES NINETY-TWO THOUSAND POUNDS AT CARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

RECKLESS GAMBLING. POLISH COUNT LOSES NINETY-TWO   THOUSAND POUNDS AT CARDS.   On Saturday afternoon, December 21, Count Joseph Potocki, a wealthy Polish magnate, lost 2,200,000 kronen, or £92,000, while playing cards at the Jockey Club in Vienna. The whole sum was lost within a couple of hours. Count Pallavicini won two-thirds of the amount. The game is said to have been baccarat, but the members of the Jockey Club are keeping the details as secret as possible.   Count Potocki has asked for three months' respite for settling the debt, and this was granted, as he owns vast estates, which alone yield a revenue of over £100,000 per annum. The heavy loss will not ruin him, however inconvenient it may be. The Jockey Club has been the scene of much reckless gambling recently. A Russian count and an Austrian prince played a game of billiards there for £40,000. The Russian lost, and in his rage demolished the billiard table,   and smashed...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMONG THE COSTERS. MATRIMONY'S BIG HAUL IN EAST LONDON. WONDERFUL COSTUMES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

AMONG THE COSTERS.   MATRIMONY'S BIG HAUL IN EAST   LONDON.   WONDERFUL COSTUMES. If the West End was desert-like yesterday (says the "Express" of December 26) the Beth- nal Green-road and the East End generally were very much alive. The "stalls" did a magnificent business, and Brick-lane was perhaps the busiest spot in the East End. Christmas Day is particularly favored by East Enders as one for getting married, and yesterday there seemed to be no end to wedding proces- sions. Scarlet appeared to be the favorite color of the bridesmaids, the fashion in "coster" cir- cles being to dress the bridesmaids in exactly the same costume as the bride. There were no fewer than eight weddings at St. John's Church, four brides being married at 9.30 and four more at 10 o'clock. Several other weddings took place at 1.30.   They were all "kerridge" folk, both at this church and at the Red Church, St. Peter's, St. Jude's, and St. James-the-Less. ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BURIED UNDER AN AVALANCHE. A COMPANY OF FRENCH SOLDIERS OVERWHELMED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

BURIED UNDER AN AVALANCHE.   A COMPANY OF FRENCH SOLDIERS OVERWHELMED. —♦—       An extraordinary disaster was reported from Chamberry on December 23. The 4th Company of the 13th Alpine Regiment was engaged in some military manoeuvres on a stretch of ground at the foot of a glacier in the Commune of Bessans, when apparently through the shak- ing of the earth by the marching of the soldiers an avalanche of snow fell, overwhelming almost the entire company. It was some time before help arrived upon the scene. Then villagers and the few soldiers who had escaped the avalanche set to work, and with great labor and difficulty cleared away the snow from the unfortunate men. It was found that 30 soldiers had been more or less seriously injured, and of these 12 were found to be suffering from frost-bitten feet. An officer and his orderly were so badly injured   that their recovery is doubtful. All the injured men were taken to ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN A STATE OF DECLINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

IN A STATE OF DECLINE. Editor: "What makes you say that I ought to buy this joke?" Humorist: "I don't believe in carrying a joke   too far, and that joke has been carried far   enough."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Britain's Most Important Man. THE EARL MARSHAL HIS WORK OF ORGANISING THE CORONATION. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

Britain's Most Important Man. THE EARL MARSHAL. —♦— HIS WORK OF ORGANISING THE   CORONATION.   Anybody who is curious as to the extent of   the organising work to be done in connection   with the forthcoming Coronation should pay a   visit to the Earl Marshal's sanctum at Norfolk   House (says the London "Evening News.")   It may be truthfully said that since the date of the ceremony was fixed by the King, and the Duke of Norfolk had set in motion his vast   machinery, which is to produce, if we are not to   be disappointed, one of the finest pageants this   century or the last has witnessed, the Earl Mar-   shal has been one of the busiest men in London.   For 400 years the Dukes of Norfolk have been   at the head of English peers—that is to say, since   the present Earl Marshal's ancestor, "Jockey of N...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Discovery and Invention. POISON AND ANTIDOTE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

Discovery and Invention. POISON AND ANTIDOTE. M. Brissaut, of Paris, must entertain some doubts about tobacco. His cigarettes have outer wrappers composed of leaves of the coffee plant, vine, aniseed, or styrax benzoine, which leaves are first fermented, and then perfumed with balsam of myrrh or some such delightful sub- stance. It is supposed that these leaves will counter- act the effects of the deadly (but slow) poison of tobacco, which lulls its victims until they become unsuspecting nonagenarians. But such hardened individuals are hardly likely to tolerate the soothing vine leaf (oh! shade of Bacchus!) and odoriferous myrrh.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CLOTHED IN ELECTRICITY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

CLOTHED IN ELECTRICITY. —♦— If apprehension of being cremated alive is con- ducive to health, then there is prosperity in store for that daring Californian, Dr. A. Phillips. He believes that to obtain the curative effect electricity must be brought into close contact with the patient. To attain this end, he weaves 150 yards of metal wire in a big sheet, made of cord-like threads. The two ends of the wire are connected with the electric main by means of a commutator. All that the patient has to do is to strip, and wrap himself in the sheet; while the medical attendant turns on the current. If the invalid survives the physical and mental ordeal of this "bath" he is rubbed down with flannel and told to consider himself cured—which he will do if he is a sensible man.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTRICITY IN THE HAIR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

ELECTRICITY IN THE HAIR.   —♦— Another uncanny use of electricity is to enlist its aid for the shampooer. Mr. A. Minty, of Chel- sea, constructs a kind of square helmet, in which the top and back of the head is to be en- cased, space being arranged for the neck, while an adjustable stand supports it. Inside the ap- pliance are shelves formed of wire gauze or per- forated metal, under which are placed electric heating coils, carried by insulators. Hair, especially that of ladies and children, after being washed, is spread lightly on the shelves, and the electricity is then turned on. The heat can be regulated, and, owing to the insu- lator, cannot make the helmet itself hot.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SENSIBLE UMBRELLA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A SENSIBLE UMBRELLA.   —♦— Hitherto umbrellas have been constructed on the principle that man ought to have someone on his arm, rain or shine. But at last two clever Germans, Herren Lewy and Laube, have come along and provided a long-suffering generation with an umbrella that really will cover its pos- sessor—if he can stick to it! The Teutonic "brolly" has a handle which is hinged in two places towards the top part; by this means the thing can be so adjusted that the centre of the mushroom cover is over the crown of one's hat, with the result that right and left, fore and aft, are equally protected from the rain.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SAFETY FOR WHISKY BOTTLES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

SAFETY FOR WHISKY BOTTLES.   An uncorked whisky or port wine bottle has an irresistible attraction for the lodging-house mouse and the domestic cat, whose tippling mis- deeds are sometimes masked by sympathetic souls pouring in water to make up the requisite bulk.     The cyathometre is a glass tube, blown with a series of constrictions, to form small bulbs. The top and bottom are sealed, but air passages are provided. Inside the tube is placed a glass ball, and on the top of this another glass sphere, to which are fixed spikes of incorrodible metal, pointing upwards. The appliance is placed in a   bottle or cask by means of wires, which can be   sealed. As the liquid is withdrawn, the glass   spherical shuttlecock sinks; but if any attempt   is made to add water the sphere cannot rise, be- cause the spikes or feelers are caught in the constrictions of the tube. Thus is fraud made palpable. Th...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A WALKING SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A WALKING SHIP. Mr. D. F. de Souza, of London, has taken out a patent for roller boats, beautifully adapted to skim the waves, to run on rails, and crawl on land. They are constructed so that several may be coupled together and form a sea-land train. Each ship is in the form of a barrel, with outer and inner casings, the outer revolving, the inner keeping level by swinging on bearings. The outer ring has hinged paddles for water travel, which flap back and bring rails into prominence for land progression. The passen- gers are carried in the inner, non-rotating barrel. The first of the series is used as a steam engine. With the de Souza barrel ships, one ought to be able to take a trip round the world by making a bee-line, which would save time and trouble.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ANOTHER IMPROVED SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

ANOTHER IMPROVED SHIP. —♦— Two Russians, Messrs. Zarling and Irschick, propose to overcome the dangers of "racing" screw propellers, and the chances of breakage or entanglements of the blades thereof, by building the hulls of ships with longitudinal channels at the bottom, in which the screws would be placed and revolved.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO MORE TOUGH STEAK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

NO MORE TOUGH STEAK. —♦— A tough steak is a sore trial, but so, too, is a slab of meat which has been brutally beaten out of all semblance to appetising food. Two Cape Colony boys, Messrs. H. E. Black- man and F. W. Hoare, have discovered the "middle way." They construct a kind of lemon squeezer on a big scale, composed of wood, with two metal plates provided with a series of blunt teeth or a series of grooves, which nearly fit into each other. All that is necessary is to screw down one of the hinged flaps, place the meat on the lower metal plate, and bring the other smartly down. It is quick, and probably not so harmful as a rolling-pin, when preparing the steak for the gridiron.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAGNETIC MUSIC. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

—♦— MAGNETIC MUSIC.   The Kratz-Boussac music instructor is com- posed of a board, across which narrow metal bands are fixed in the position of music bars. These metal bands are highly magnetised. Ac- companying the board is an outfit of musical notes of all kinds, stamped out of metal. The student or composer arms himself with an ordinary horseshoe magnet, with which he picks up any desired note and puts it in place; of course, any combinations may be arranged, and mistakes speedily corrected. You may look upon this as an instructive game or a practical aid to education. It is assuredly a smart idea neatly carried out.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW METHOD OF SCULPTURE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

—♦—       NEW METHOD OF SCULPTURE.   A good many attempts have been made to perform the heavy work of sculpture by mechanical purposes, but, though in- genious devices appear from time to time, they do not usually survive continued experi- ment. A step in the right way has been made, how- ever, by the recent utilisation of the sand-blast for making designs on granite. An iron mould or pattern of the design which is to be left in relief, or to be sunk on the surface of the stone, is made. This is placed in position, and the sand-blast turned on. The hardened iron resists the blast; the stone yields to it, and is gradu-   ually "blown away."   The same trade journal which describes this   contrivance also discusses some possibilities of   new quarries in South Africa. Good quarrying   limestone is present in Weenen County, near   the Tugela Drift, and the f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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