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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

STICKERS. ? V, The Press Committee have plenty of I.W.W. Stickers on hand. They are in large type, smart, and to the point. Each Sticker has 'an imprint on it, in accordance with the boss's law. We will send along 1,000 to any address in Australia for 2/9, 5.000 for 12/, and 10,000 for £1/2/6. Please send cash with order. Orders will be sent to New Zealand, provided 3d extra is enclosed per thousand for add;; ? ? ? ???-. postage. Address: Manager, Box 98, Haymarket, N.S.W. ADELAIDE READERS Can obtain copies of 'Direct Ac tion'' and industrialist Literature j'l-oni Charlie Russell, bootmaker, Gibson-streeJ:; Jiowdeii, Adelaide,

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Propaganda In Queensland. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

Propaganda In Queensland. Fellow-worker Jackson writes from .Gordoiivale, near Cairns, K. Queens land: — Unabie to hold meeting at Babinda sugar niiil en account cf heavy rain, held meeting at Gordonvale, a sugar ceuue, 11 miles from Cairns, on New Year's Eve. I would have succeeded in obtaining a good few more subs, for 'Direct Action' only for the up roar. The .slaves up this way are greatly interested in the 'I.W.W. ' neeureu zi new suuscnuei :?. Several sugar cockiea and highly respectable rascals in business her^ continually interjected during the lat ter part of the meetiug, which ter minated at 10 p.m. with a few straight lefts, half-arm jolts, and catcbas ' catch-can struggles on the road. Re ceived a good hearing otherwise. Nov.', Fellow-slaves, wake up! A new year cf slavery has been ushered in. Why .should you further allow these industrial pirate:- and robbers known as the capitalist class, to fur iher exploit you? The- audacity ol these scoundrels telling us what we as ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Conscription Protest. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

Conscription frotest. y-?llov, -worker John M. Burke .vrites from Allendale, Victoria: — A few of the rebels 'here got to business last week and organised u meeting to discuss conscription. The meeting was billed for Sunday after nuon, January 2nd, and the result (-xcoerted our most sanguine expecta tions , a very large crowd rolling up I to hear the arguments put forward. I j he meeting started punctually at I 3.15 p.m., Mr. D. McGrath being vot I ed to the chair. Two John Hops I we:? also present in plain clothes I t0 manufacture a case if possible, I aciiirist any one who may have said I anything naughty about the Empiah. I The chairman, in his opening re | masks, referred to the great iinpori [ anc- to every one of this question, ? I ar.'i caustically condemned the auth | orit;es and the Labor Government in I particular for the treatment that the I free speech advocates are receiving I ail over Australia. I Fellow-worker Mclnerney followed I the chairman witfi a rousing address,...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Politician's Passing. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

The Mtitia''s Passing. As rosy dawn came peeping through the blind, A politician's soul from earth toolc wing. A most .amazing thing it was to find Thai such a tiny, weak and shrivell'd thing, A measly soul — no bigger than a louse — Had dwelt in such a goodly seeming house. Then swiftly whizzed the tiny, buzzing plague, And headed for the Gate where Peter sat; It's plans were neither nebulous nor vague, All Heaven waited — it was sure of that. On spheres -mundane the life this insect led, Develops what the vulgar call swelled head. St. Peter dozing at the Pearly Gate, Aroused himself and yawned, with jaded eye , lie watched old Sol. the Earth illuminate, Then stretched himself, as with a weary sigh, He looked along the straight and narrow road, And shook his head and murmured, 'Well, I'm blowed!' The Saint was puzzled and a bit annoyed, His takings at the Gate were falling off; The antics of his touts, on Earth employed, Inclined most folk at Peter's joint to scoff. .. While wrapt ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Women And The War. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

Women And The War. (By j.W.) To those of us whose vision is not blurred by sentimentality, one of the more remarkable features cf the war has been the eagerness, the un seemly eagerness, of our women, to get us males intG the tren ? . well, into khaki, anyway. There have been 'proud mothers' ready had they twenty sono to sacrifice them all; there have been white feather cam paigns. The writer is not a compe titor for the favors of the Sydney girls, but he is tcld that ycu have no chance unless in khaki. Every male who so far has successfully re sisted the various stimulants of re cruiting — compulsory unemployment, starvation, posters, promises of ma terial benefits after the war, moral and religious constraints, threats ol compulsion, has also suffered an. amount of female persecution. Many a 'patriotic'' enlister is simply run ning away from his womenkiud. The women have been terrible recruiting sergeants. Now, to cap it all, we have the Na tional Council of Women organising their...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SEGREGATION. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

SEGREGATION. I „ 'Segregation is a process tending I ' ever to separate unlike units and I bring together like units;' thus sharp ! e.ning and making more definite dif I ferentiation otherwise caused.' — Her- I bert Spencer. I Thus, segregation tends ever to I sharpen and make more definite the ^m difference between an honest man H and a politician, the exploiter and his' H victims, and the policy of doing ^B things for ourselves instead of de ^B pending on others to do them for us. ^1 Segregation is, then, a process per ^H vading the cosmos and aiding us in ? our efforts to atta'in freedom. ^M In the development of the 'trust' ^m ^e see segregaton separating and ^m naking clear the grant schemes of ? robbery, planned and practised by H tae master thieves whose impulse to B steal is scarce satisfied by the pos ? session of the whole earth and the ? enslavement of all their fellows. ? Segregation is also sorting out and ?t arranging in order those human un ^B its who have the sense t...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Labor's Enemy—Labor. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

Labor's Enemy-Labor. (By OLD EUREKA). Bernard Shaw some years ago de clared 'That Socialism would be ail right if it were not for the Socialists.' Assuming this epigrammatic state ment to be, in a degree, correct of the socialist movement, it applies with greater truth to the Labor move ment of Australia. For certainly the 'Labor move ment would be all right n it were not for the workers. The capitalists are keeping up their end fairly well, constantly pin pricking and galling the. workers in every line of industry by increasing exploitation, though diminishing the number employed. Thu politicians contribute to their quota of confusion by heading off every inclination to direct action on each occasion that the slaves raise a slight revolt, consequent on some greater taxation by the slaveowner?. The rank and file of sectional un ionists are mostly unconscious of the class war that is raging, and the political grafters, in combination with the salaried parasites of the Trades Hall in ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Suppression of Free Speech. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

The Suppression of Free Speech. Once again the Labor Government of N.S.W. lias taken upon itself the responsibility of lulling tho working class what ideas it shall and shall not give utterance (o. Anything; that savours of- criticism of things as they are, more especially II 1111 VUH.U Ui.llll'J' I. JJ.V. JJUhiU) Vj' VI 1.1 11 meiit, must only be made public at The risk of sacrificing tlie liberty of the individual. Last week Chief Secretary Black sent, a police jnosseujjcr to the I.W.W. ^ hall notifying us that it was liis (Mr. Tilaek's) pleasure that no further street meetings should be held. Mr. ; Black's wife having recently been T elected as 'Queen of the Allies.' he . is evidently under the impression that I the next step towards honnr for the Black family is for himself to assume the role of Czar or Dictator. The I.W.W.. however, is not over concerned with Mr. Black's opinion of j himself; neither do we lose any sleep I with regard to his opinion as to the merits or otherwis...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
On The Track. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

On The Track. Some I.W.W. slaves in Sydney de cided to celebrate the New Year by going on a jaunt to the fruit district of Mildura in search of a master. The following letter, dated January 3rd, received from one of their number, from Wagga, would seem to indicate that their holiday is a remarkable success; — week out from Sydney, our progress is being greatly hampered by the po lice. At Picton, having run out ot cash, and. having built the railways, we decided to ride on them; so all hands (eight in number) climbed in to a covered truck. Now, some slaves, probably railway slaves, haa' been regaling themselves on beer and cheese, which they had extracted from a barrell and box, forgetting to re place the bung in the barrel: so upon arrival at Junee we were arrested and charged wifh riding without pay ing fares. In the court, a railway slave, sent to prosecute us, mentioned the broached beer, and asked for a heavy penalty; but we pointed out to his 'Washup' that we were only being tr...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REVOLUTION. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 22 January 1916

REVOLUTION. The Point Elizabeth and Liverpool State Employees' Industrial Union in New Zealand recently passed the fol Icwins resolution anent Conscrip tion: — 'Resenting the utterances of certain members e[ the Ministry and the ing to bring about a feeling favorable to conscription of the flesh and blood of the working classes of New Zea land, v.'bile at the same time failing to conscript the wealth and private property oi' the rich: furthermore we are determined to meet such a cala mity as conscription by industrial re volution.'

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
No title [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

All privileged and po* g classes, as such, have used tig I power in the interests of tjfl 1 own selfishness, and have mdu| 1 ed their self importance in 4JJJ 1 ing, and not in lovingly *** I for, those who were, in the* r» 1 timation, degraded hy bang** f or the necessity of J«rkfSi I their benefits-John Stuart^ ? Briefly, ?he reason for unemjW J ment is that there is not enoug^l to go around. What about * *- I work-day and slowing down? I Printed and Published on *eh^^ I Industrial Workers of the ^ I John Hamilton, Cbairn** * I Committee, 330 CM**-*' I Sydney, N.S.W. I

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ADDRESSES OF I.W.W. LOCALS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

ADDRESSES OF I.W.W. I LOCALS. 1 Adelaide Local No. 7— Secretary-Trea- I surer, S. G. Drummond, 43 Charles- I street, Unley, Adelaide, S.A. I Sydney, Local No. 2.-Secretary 1 Treasurer, T. Glynn, 330 Castlereagh- I street, Sydney, N.S.W. I Broken Hill Local No. 3— Secretary- 1 Treasurer, E. J. Kiely, Palace Build- 1 ings, SulpMde-street, Broken Hill, I N.S.W. I Fremantie, Local No. 5.-Secretary ? Treasurer, C. T. Reeve, IS South- | street, Fremantie, W.A. ? Boulder Local, No. 6— Secretary-Trea- ? surer, F. H. Lunn, Lane-street, Boul- ? der, W.A. ? Brisbane, Local No. 7.-Secretary | Treasurer, G. B. Bright, Redfern- ? street, West Gabba, Brisbane, Q- ? Melbourne Local, No. 8~Se'f ^ I Treasurer, R. Power, 243 WiD— | street. Melbourne, V. ?

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BROKEN HILL ACTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

BROKEN HILL ACTIVITIES. ..Rooms, Palace Buildings, Sulphide-.. 1 street. I Wednesday Evening, at 7.30 p.m. — Edu- I cational Glass. I Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m.-— Business I Meeting. I Alternate Sundays, at 3 p.m.— Econo- I nomic Glass. I Sunday, at 7.30 p.m. — Outdoor Propa- I gauda Meeting, near Post Office, in I Argent-street. I Good Library. Also good collection 1 of Literature for sale. All live rebels I welcome. I E. J. KIELY, Secretary, i Local No. 3, I.W.TV. I W-\'- ? ? 1

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
literature List. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

Literature List Capital: Karl Marx, U vol., 8/- per ? volume. .-.;? ? Ancient Society: Morgan, Bouud, 1 Value, Price, and Prolit: Marx I Bound, 2/-: paper, tni. ' 1 Evolution of Property : Lapargue 1 Bound, 2/-. ' ? The Militant Proletariat: Lewis I Bound, 2/-. '= I The New Unionism : Tr idon. Panur ? 1/8. : I Sabotage; Pouget. Lound, 2/- M paper, 1/-. ' ? One Big Union: Trautman, Paper -? 6d. ? Sabotage: W. G. Smith, Paper ? U. ' ? Sabotage : E. G. Flyxm ; paper, 3d, ? I.W.W. History, Structure, and fl Methods : St. Jolin. Paper, 3d. ? Revolution and the I.W.W.: Pease ? Paper, 3d. ' ? Eleven Blind Leaders: B. H. Wil- fl lianas. :-Paper, 3d. fl Political Socialism, or Capturing ? the Government: Nelson. Paper ? 3d. ' ? War: What For (Cartoon). Price ? 3d. ? Revolutionary Unionism: E. J. B ? Allen. Paper, 2d. ? Why the A.W.U. Cannot Become ? an Industrial Union: Alex. ? Georgev Paper. 3d. B Industrial Efficiency and Its An- m tidote: T. Glynn. Paper, 2d. ? I.W.W. Songs: Paper, 3d. ? ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

DIRECT ACTION WEEKLY OFFICIAL ORGAN Of the INDUSTRIAL WORKERS OF THE WORLD. -Austra1ian Administration). Office:— 330 Castlereagh St., Sydney, Australia. Editor: Thos. Glynn. Manager: Tom Barker. Subscriptions: .4/ per year; New Zealand, 6/ per year; Foreign, 8/ per year. HEADQUARTERS I.W.W. (Australia) 330 CASTLEREAGH ST., SYDNEY. GENERAL HEADQUARTERS: 164 W. Washington St., Chicago, 111., U.S.A.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Workers v. Shirkers. BOULDER, W.A. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

Workers v. Shirkers. BOULDER, YV'.A. On January 1st of this year, some r.ix hundred woodcutters ceased work on .ihiee -wood-lines, .namely, Kurra v.ang, Kunainia, aud Lakeside, de manding L-etter conditions, which, the representatives of the Woodline Co. refused. The' .said Woodlines have .supplied the mining industry here on the so-called Golden Mile for some 20 years. This is the industry on which Dicky Hamilton, Chairman of .the Chamber of Mines, so often, boasted of the workers never having had a strike or industrial dispute, which is not saying much for the intelligence oi' the workers here. Those six hundred workers are re presented (or misrepresented) by three salaried cralt union officials, who are in conference since the cessa tion of work with the reps, of the Woodline Co., Chamber of Mines, and the Acting Premier, who is also Min ister lor Mines (Mr. Collier). Collier offered the mniing compan ies to supply wood from Great Re serves at the usual rates, but for some unexpl...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Billy's Fireworks. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

Billy's Fireworks. Tht- dwarfish popinjay who is La bor Prime Minister of Australia, and whose sole claim to emineuoe ana notoriety is a 'gift of the gab,' ac quired apparently during his canvas sing days as mender and pedlar of ; ohi umbrellas, lias been frothing a ' great deal at the mouth lately. ? .. I. W.W.'s, syndicalists, and others I h;aTe. come in lor his tinkerish vitu i Deration because of their refusal to accept uis ueumiiion oi patriotism, to silently acquiesce in the scabby ten dencies of what he calls 'unionism,' and also because they have a pro nounced disinclination to accept as spokesman for the working class a I blackleg little scoundrel who has done more to break strikes and keep the workers bound to the masters I treadmill *or the past ten years, than, all, the straight-out capitalist politi -j. eians and the iafl-uenoe of the whole f ot the capitalist press of Australia combined. . Fresh from his conference some days ago with trust magnates and ? big. gun explo...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SPEAKERS' CLASS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

SPEAKERS' CLASS. The Speakers' Class has been re-' started at the Sydney Local. There is a pressing need for au everin creasing supply of able propagandists — fellows who can expound and ex plain the philosophy ' and methods of the I.W.W. and make more converts, especially on the job. There are plenty who have a fair understand ing of Industrial Unionism, but fail to make its principles clear to their mates owing to lack of practice in speaking and putting their case lo gically and concisely. The speakers' class aims at starting fresh ones on the road to effective speaking. It is held every Saturday at 7.15 p.m., at 330 Castlereagh-street. Individualism is only logically and consistently possible if it starts with the postulate that all men must, to begin with, have free and equal ac cess to the common gifts of nature. —Grant Allen.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
British Capital Exults OVER BIG WAR PROFITS—CAUS'S Or LABOR'S "DISLOYALTY" DISCUSSED. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

British Capital Exults OVER BIG WAI? PROFITS— GAUSsj' OF LABOR'S 'DISLOYALTY' DISCUSSED. Much has been said, remarks 'Solidarity' (U.S.A.), about tue 'di- loyalty of British labor, especially by the capitalist press. The cause of this 'disloyalty' will be found in the article reprinted below, from the 'New York World.' It shows, in directly, that British labor was ex pected to die on the battlefield and stand tremendous increases in the cost of livlflg, together with indus 4 l'io 1 iri-t /ill oi firtO f ir*»i -wH ila 'Ri'iiich capital was enabled to increase its trade and reserves in a way that puts an Arabian Night's dream to shame. Take notice of the exulta tion orer the latter fact expressed in the article, and don't you, Mr,. American Workingmen, be sucli a fool as to. rush into war so that yo-; may provide cause for exultation on the part of American capital. 'Wai- ts hell' — to the workers. It is pro fitable — a means of further enrich ment and aggrandizement — to the capitali...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Female And Child Labor in India. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 29 January 1916

Female And Child Labor in India. 'Bent Axle'' writes I'roin Scarbor ough, South Coast: — The. following is from the annuaJ report, of Indian ? -Jining, lS'l-i, and which 1 thought would oe of interest to your readers: — MINING 1M INDIA. REPORT' OF CHIEF INSPECTOR. PERSONS EMPLOYED. From the annual report of Mr. G. F. Adams, Chief Inspector oi Mines in India: — In the year 1914 the average num ber o£ persons working in and aboiit tlie mines regulated by the Indian Mines Act, was 185,211, of whom 120,071 worked underground, and 65,140 on the surface. Of tnese 115,174 were adult males, 64,179 were adult females, and 5..85S were chil dren under 12 years oi' age. This is an increase of 3,951 workers, or 2.1t- per cent. The above is part of the oiid.il report for 1914, and is taken i'rom the 'Science and An. of Mining.' a mining periodical. The main reasons why I am forwarding the afocne are: It will Jet your readers t-oe quite plainly that woman and child labor in mines in. the British E...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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