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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

Tub Indian Advocate. 105 time as a temporary kitchen and refectory could be erected. This building was erected about twelve years ago, for the occupancy of the Benedictine Sisters. These latter came here at different periods, ranging from five to twelve years previous, and some of them rounded out their life's work and have gone to their heavenly reward. There are now located here eight of the Sisterhood. They are a valuable adjunct to the community, as by them are performed all of the cook ing, laundry work and sewing and mending, not only for the community, but also for the pupils of the Indian School, as well as the novitiate. When it is taken into consideration that the occupants of the Mission and schools average over a hundred souls, the magnitude of their daily task can be ap preciated. But they are faithful and uncomplaining and cheerful, and God, in His infinite mercy and wisdom, will re quite them for their life of toil in His own good time. Thk hottest place in America, a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

io6 The Indian Advocate. ;:: u. Alleluia. M Yes, in that desolate land so far away, Hope links pale hands with Patience, and behold, Triumphant over death, God stands confessed! And they, whose hearts were sore with long delay, Put off their sombre robes for wings of gold, Mingling their Alleluias with the rest. We celebrate with love and respect the anniversary day of the birth and of the death of many a great man and friend; but we do not celebrate the anniversary of their resurrection. Our Blessed Savior Jesus Christ, the Man-God, has been the first and the only one to conquer death, and of His own power to come to life again. "Christ is risen from the dead, the first fruit of them that sleep," says the Apostle. There fore, after Him, the others who are dead will also rise from their ashes, by the mercy of God. We form, with Christ, a perfect whole, a body, of which He is the head; the members must follow the state in which is the head. What would a body be of which the head woul...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 107 in spring-time; the grass that was dried up comes to life again; the seed that decays in the earth springs up, full of life, in a new form. All these figures show us that what dis appears for a time can resume its former condition. As Ter tullian says, "All things come to an end, in order to begin anew." What we see in creatures is realized in man, in a much more sublime manner. God created man indestructi ble. O, magnificent hope! Man, who lives only a little while here below in the midst of miseries, has need of hope. What comfort is not contained in this dogma of the Church: "I expect the resurrection of the flesh and life everlasting!" O, consoling doctrine, which forms the triumph of our hope amidst the labors and sufferings of this life! We know that we are destined to rise with Jesus Christ: our tears will be changed into joy, our trials into delights, our poverty into abundance, our confusion into glory, our death into eternal life. In the day of bit...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

io8 The Indian Advocate. K ffc xl The Devil In the lloly Water Portt. ijt I! kKI'KODUCKD HV RKQUKST. , To the Venerable, the Prophet and President of the Church of Latter-Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah: Venerable Prophet and Father in God: According to promise and instructions received from the Church Committee, I beg to submit the following report of my missionary labors: I left the city of Zion, as you know, about the beginning of November last by the Rio Grande. As instructed, I took the East for my field of labor the particular points thereof being left to the guidance of the spirit. I first brought the light of the gospel to the Gentiles who dwell jn the region of Colorado, chiefly to the Asperians, to the Leduillians, the Pueblo-Oriens and to the inhabitants of Colorado Springs. 1 had piously hoped that in that land of Canaan I could reap a rich harvest of converts to the true faith, but now I tell you, weeping, they are enemies of the Cross of Christ. 1 hoped, indeed, to ga...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. iog erable for the inhabitants of Tyre and Sidon on that day than for the people of the Silver State. I immediately turned my back on the infidel herd and di rected my footsteps to pastures new. I was further impelled to this sudden departure by a letter which I received from some person or persons unknown, bearing on the envelope the picture of a coffin, underneath which was written in large let ters, "Mormon Tabernacle." I opened the letter, which read as follows: Mr. Prophet, we give you 24 hours to get over the State line. If you ever recross it, there will be one prophet less in Zion. Yours, etc., Gentilr. My eyes were opened and my mind enlightened to under stand the Scriptures. 1 thought of those words which 1 had lately uttered in vain: "How beautiful are the feet of those evangelizing peace evangelizing good things!" I thought my feet never looked so beautiful, so swiftly did they carry me out of Egypt. The perverse and unbelieving generation! Their pun...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

no Thk Indian Advocate. that they were very hospitable at the monastery and received all travelers irrespective of class or creed, I started for the Sacred Heart Mission, Oklahoma. I was now in good spirits, although my sleep was broken by sundry visions of coffins, lamp-posts, masked men and ropes. At length the Mission was reached. It presents a fine and stately appearance, the tower of the beautiful new church reaching into the clouds. It is a model or type of the abbeys of continental Europe. I was not misinformed as to the nature of the reception that would be given me. Nothing could be more welcome and kindly. One of the Fathers met me at the door with out stretched hand, and introduced me at once to two warm friends a blazing fire and a hot supper. After I had supped and had a reasonable time to digest the good things served up, I was shown a room, neat and comfortable, which I was told was to be at my disposal while I remained. They asked me many things about Utah, but, to m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

Thk Indian Advocate. hi quickly from my couch, and had scarcely finished my toilet when the good Brother, with his usual smile upon his face, entered, bending under the weight of a large tray on which was laid a tempting breakfast. In rather provincial French he asked me how I was. 1 knew just enough French to be able to say I was very well and thank him for his kindness. "You sleep-a the veely veel?" said he. "Well, not very well," said I, for he was so good I hated to tell him a lie. I asked him to kindly send me one of the Fathers who could speak English, and they all seemed to speak it freely. "Oh," said he "me no understand English; me speak-a the Basque." Exit the Brother; enter the Father. After the conven tional exchange of courtesies, I ventured to ask him for an ex planation of the alarm-bell and the mysterious noise, and he said, with a smile: "Oh, that was the monks chanting 'Matins and Lauds,' which they rise every night at one o'clock to re cite. I hope it did not dist...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

112 The Indian Advocate. You," said he to me, "pretend to bean apostle and to preach the doctrine of St. Paul, and yet you don't know this! Does not your doctrine seem to be more according to the flesh than the spirit?" There are different branches of this ancient and historic order of Benedictines, but this is the only one in which the original rule of the illustrious founder is observed to the let ter. With the other observances of this peculiai mode of life I am not sufficiently acquainted, and though I were, I have not sufficient time to refer to them. Suffice it to say that the day is divided up into a series of duties, with the strictest economy. Some are teaching, some walking about in deep meditation or kneeling in silent prayer before the altar, some working in the fields, some at various trades, some many miles away in the active work of the mission, but all always occu pied, and reflecting in their faces, withal, that spirit of peace which reigns unbroken and supreme. It ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

"3 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE The Indian Advocate. t rtr Published by the Benedictine Fathers of jj jj SAOBBD HEART MISSION, OKLAHOMA. jj A Monthly Review Under the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michae and St. Benedict. Approved by our regular Superiors. TKHMS OF SUIlHCRIlTIONl Single Copies 15c. Annual Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies senc to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign $1.25. Entered as Second-class Matter at Sacreil Heart, Oklahoma. I'RIVILEOESl 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate n all the merits, prayers and good works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. z. A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. 3. A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. Every year, in the month of September, two Solemn Masses are sung for our Rene factors, one for the Living and one for...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

ii4 The Indian Advocate. Those who possess any real excellence think and say the least about it. Slugs crawl over our cabbages as the world's slander crawls over a good name. You may kill them, it ' ; true, but slime remains. - To procure real domestic happiness, four things are neces sary: "A merciful God, good health, a good housewife and a happy death." Inspire a child with right feelings, and you will govern its actions; hence the truth of the old adage: "Example is bet ter thanzwr." The best, the surest-course is never to have recourse to deception, but prove ourselves in every circumstance of life equally sincere and upright. Although war is still waging in the Philippines, neverthe less the Benedictine monks of .Mount-Serat (Spain) have for several months past taken up their peaceful employment of educating the natives. Despite the fact that some of them have been in danger of death (being accused of treason to their country), the good Fathers, with a truly Christian ven gean...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 115 Envy, hatred, malice and uncharitablenessl How melan choly and heart-rending to reflect upon the vast number of professing Christians of all orders who show, by their deeds, that they are under the influence of these infernal passions although in their daily devotions they may pray against them with their lips and entreat their Maker to enable them to keep the law which says, "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor!" Alas! how unlike the conduct of the true Christian! Inteu.ectualism is the craze of the age, but intellect is only one of the powers of man. Greater than intellect, more essential to a true development of manhood, is the heart, from which, as Vauvenargues says, "all great thoughts come." Knowledge alone cannot save manhood which craves for love and seeks for more heart development. The Graeco Roman classicism failed to touch the depths of human needs. Fraternity, Equality, Liberty, sprang from the love which was made known to the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

I n6 The Indian Advocate. swindlers are as common as thieves. Is it any wonder, then, that we read so many protests, by good and just men, against the system of Godless schools so prevalent to-day? No; men are now beginning to learn that although education without God can make men good scientists, good physicians, good lawyers, it cannot make men good; it cannot make men happy. It is the same old story: Religion and knowledge must go hand-in-hand if the entire man is to be developed if all man's aspirations are to be satisfied. Education means the forming of character; this is impossible without religion. Our Fathers in Palestine are presently occupied in laying the foundations of their home at Aboo-Gosh, and of a Syrian Seminary at Mount Olivet. While thus working, one of them, the Rev. Fr. Raphael, O. S. B., has made an important discovery, viz: a Roman inscription, attesting that the foun dations of the ancient Church of Carahasion were laid by the X. Legion of Emperor Vespasian ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate, 117, who, against the advice of pastors and parents, attend ques tionable dances, take a step downwards which too often proves disastrous. They deliberately go forth to seek a dan ger, and it is very often probable that they will perish in it. France exhibits at present a strange spectacle, says the Messenger. The religious must either go into voluntary exile or submit to the dictates of a Freemason Government. As the law strikes in an especial manner at the orders of men, it is natural that most of these orders have left, whereas the majority of the orders of women (1,151 orders or congrega tions) may stay where they are. France has taken rup the fight against the religious. She has begun the fight, against the schools where religion is taught. France has,, virtually thrown the gauntlet against the Church pf which she claims to be the oldest daughter. Shall we mourn and be discouraged? No. Go on, Mr. Waldeck-Rousseau! Persecutions will awaken the sleeping Churc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

PWW u8 The Indian Advocate. fj tJ 4 ll 1 4? tit I A Sister of Uiarim. .. 4 4 n? tit t Continued from the March Number. Abbe Emery, who could oppose Napoleon's will, came to Soeur Rosalie to warm his courage: M. de Lammenais was among her greatest friends before his fall, and never was fully despaired of by his previous admirers till he lefused to see RV his protectress. "I was in prison, and Sister Rosalie visited me. She was the dove of peace that brought me my food twice a day," said Abbe Combalot, who was condemned for his generous defence of Catholic principle against powerful but unjust usurpation. Donoso Cortes, the distinguished writer and ambassador at Paris, came to her to learn what use to make of time that hung upon his hands. A list of poor people he visited became his recreation, and the privilege of reciting his adventures each week to his benefactress was his only earthly reward. When he became attacked with his last illness, Sister Rosalie left the Faubourg St. Marce...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 119 than their reputation; their poverty and privations made known fewer vices than exist under the cloak of wealth and luxury elsewhere." In 1832 she manifested her zeal as a nurse of cholera pa tients. A horrid impression had gone abroad that the physi cians and druggists were employed by the.government to poi son the poor. Such a report found too many willing believers among the ignorant, who were in large numbers in Sister Rosa lies's district. One day a distinguished physician was passing by, with a patient who was carried to the hospital. "Down with the poisoner!" cried the mob, and he was at once sur rounded by. a menacing gathering. In the midst of his ene mies he had the good thought of exclaiming, "Sister Rosalie is a friend of mine; I am serving her sick." "Oh, that is different," said they, and he, was allowed to pass unmolested. In 1849 she was equally noble in her conduct, 'and had the hap piness not to lose one of her sisters, by the disease; a si...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

mfmlmmSmSmmm 120 ' The Indian Advocate. police. ' When notified of this fact anew, M. Guisquet, then prefect of police, signed the order for her arrest, and gave his first assistant instructions to proceed at once to its execution. "If you arrest Sister Rosalie, the whole Faubourg St. Mar ceau will be in arms, and you will find a riot on your hands that will not easily be suppressed," replied the assistant; "every man in the district would take up her cause." "That Sister Rosalie must then be very powerful," cried the prefect. "Well, I'll go and see her myself." "What can I do for you, my friend?" said the sister to the gentleman, whom she had never seen. "Excuse me for a lit tle while," and off she started on a mission of charity, after which she returned and made her excuses for having detained him so long. "1 am not come to ask any assistance or service," replied M. Guisquet, "but rather to offer you some. I am the prefect of police. Do you know that by protecting an ex-officer o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. 121 officer complained of her innocent duplicity. "Well, what would you have me to do? I would do as much for you, and I wished to spare you the pain of arresting him." An unfortunate government agent had offended her dioce sans, and his house was already surrounded, when Sister Ro salie heard of the trouble. At once on the scene, she began by scolding the rioters; told them she was ashamed of their conduct, and induced them to return to their work. When she used to speak of the troubles of 1848, she would say: "I believe that if you had gone down to hell those days, you would not have found a single devil there. They were all on our streets;. I shall never forget their features." At the beginning of these troubles, many wives brought their husbands to Sister Rosalie to keep them out. of harm's way. Some days after, the police visited her house, but ex cused themselves, saying that they did so merely for form's sake; that they did not expect to find any arms con...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

122 The Indian Advocate. father; he is good. We need him greatly!" "But," said the general, "he has doubtless done something bad." "No, I am certain; my mother says so, and besides, I promise you he never will do it again, if guilty. Pity my poor father. I promise to love you well!" The sister joined her glance to the child's prayer, which was heard. Innocence and charity, the most powerful pleaders in the world, had triumphed. But we must stop this recital somewhere, if we wish to say a word about Sister Rosalie individually. So many and such distracting occupations never prevented her union with God; familiarized from her youth with the sight of misery, she re mained tender-hearted till the hour of her death. "God has rendered me blind," she said, "for I have taken too much pleasure in seeing the poor." "I suffered nothing from your hand," she replied to the surgeon who performed the opera tion for cataract, "but I was thinking of the poor who must leave their homes to undergo suc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

v The Indian Advocate. 123 , pleased with you to-day. I see it in your eyes." "Your good angel will not follow you; you walked impatiently," she said another time; begin anew and say a little prayer." A sister " was keeping a poor person waiting for a letter. "Well, your angel guardian is holding the pen; do not make him delay," and the letter was immediately written. Humility marked all her words, and "sister servant" was fc the only name she recognized. Charity consumed her; confi- dence in God was her mainstay, and hatred of praise and f secular popularity her safeguards. . She loved to hear Bos- suet's sermons read to her. They were more substantial than those of Masillon, who had written, she said, for grandees, not for simple Sisters of Charity. When death called, her eyes had already been closed for some time to the beauties and miseries of earth, and the thousands who followed the remains that had ceased to serve (v their noble mission, February 6th, 1856, bore witness to th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

124 The Indian Advocate. ri ? g I j Authority and Blessedness of Confession. :j In going to confession, are we not too liable to forget that it is really not so much the man to whom our confession is made as to our Lord Jesus Christ whom the confessor repre sents, and by whose authority absolution is pronounced? queries the Sacred Heart Review. It is as if our Lord Him self sat in the tribunal and listened to our confession. The old adage, Qui facit per alium facit per Se "What one does by another he does by himself" holds good here without any qualification. The official act of a representative of the gov ernment, whether at home or abroad, binds the government to the obligation of fulfilling the contract, whatever it may be. The authority of the confessor is derived from the solemn act of our Lord Himself, when He said: "I give unto you (the apostles) the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatsoever you shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatsoever you shall loose on e...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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