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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

10 DISCUSSION ON ORCHARD IRRIGATION. The subject of Orchard Irrigation is one of vital importance in many parts of the Northwest, In this as in other subjects there are best ways of doing it and there are poor ways. We wished to present these best methods in the columns of our paper for the benefit of our readers. In order to do this we sent out some time ago, to some of the most prominent and progressive irrigators of the state, a list of questions on this subject of Orchard Irrigation, which we reproduce below. We also give the answers received, which contain much valuable information. We extend a very cordial invitation to any oth ers who have had experience in this matter, to write out the answers to these questions and any other information they can give and send to us for publication. The Questions. No. 1. When do you irrigate? (a) When do you commence? (b) When do you shut the water off? No. 2. Is winter irrigation advisable? No. 3. How much water should be used? No. 4. What ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

For winter irrigation I should flood my soil, but use ditches entirely for summer irrigation. 5. The Natchez and Cowyche ditch, from which I receive water, measures water through a box one foot wide by four feet long. On one side of the box and on a level with the floor is cut the orifice, a horizontal slot, always 2 inches wide, but long enough to draw the proper number of shares of water — square inches per share, water in box to stand continually 8 inches deep. It makes what we call a 6-inch pressure—6-inch pressure of wa ter above top of orifice. 6. I presume this ditch gives us about as cheap water and about as steady a flow as any ditch in this part of the country. The ranchers under it are the incorporators and sole owners, each ranch er owning a few shares of stock, some more, some less. Thus all the cost there can be is for run ning expenses, usually about $2 per share each year. We figure about one-half to three-quarter inch of water for an acre of orchard, or three quarte...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

12 LEWIS COUNTY INSPECTOR'S REPORT. Editor Ranch and Range: I have not been able to make a complete exam ination of the orchards of this county, as the commissioners limited my time to twenty-flvedays. Very little spraying was done in this county the past year, and most of the spraying done the pre vious year was for green aphis, oyster-shell bark lice and fungus. The codlin moth has not gained a very strong foothold here, so very little effort has been made to even hold it in check. I have tried to impress upon the minds of all owners of fruit trees the necessity of fighting all fruit pests, and judging from the promises made I am quite sure this winter will see most of the old orchards of this county cleaned up. All the commercial or chards here are young and are quite free from pests. The lime, sulphur and salt solution is most generally used and always in the dormant season, and bordeaux mixture for fungus during the sum mer. The greater part of the acreage planted to fruit tree...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

HARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. Burbank potatoes are higher. Leas and less Early Rose potatoes are grown each year. Those who have grown them this year are not selling them now. * Potatoes—Native Burbanks, $12@14; Yak ima Burbanks, $14@16. Apple market is very quiet. Apples— 75c@$l; very fancy, $1® 1.25; apples, cooking, 35@65c. To quote them ln another way, they are: Waxen apples, 40_>60c; Greenings, 50@60c; Belleflower. 50c@$l; King, 50c(g>$l; Spitzen berg, 75c@51.25; Baldwin, 50c@$l; Gloria Mundi, 40@50c. Pears— Nellies, $1@1.50; ordinary, 50(_375c. •>.'■*'■• Celery, 40c per doz; lettuce, 10c; hothouse lettuce, 40c; onions, silverskins, 75c@$l; cab bage, l@l%c per lb for native; parsnips, 75c @$1 per sack; Cauliflower, 60c<3>$l per doz; turnips, 50c per sack; Merced sweets, l%'@2c; carrots, 50c per sack; beets, 75c per sack; cranber ries, $7@o per bbl; pumpkins, %c; squash, l@_i_c. Creamery butter is selling at 26@28c. Bran is selling at $14 and shorts at $15. PAYING PRICE...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

14 IN DEFENCE OF FARH BUTTER. In view of the many claims that are made in regard to the superiority of creamery butter over ordinary farm butter, the letter given below In defense of this latter class of butter will be read with interest. Some of the claims generally made about poor farm butter are true, but a great deal that is said below is also true. Creamery men have several advantages over the ordinary rancher anyway. Among other things they can get a more uniform product, manufactur ing so much; the flavor, color, etc., being alike. Whereas, when many small parcels of butter of dif ferent farmers are put together, the result is a mixture of color, flavor and quality. This destroys the good appearance and detracts from the price, and yet it is not the fault of the individual maker, speaks the writer of the letter referred to, which we tak from Hoard's Dairyman. He says that given the same facilities for market ing their product, the great majority of the farm ers' wives make as...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

Pacific f|i Jacob Hettrick, jfi^Jl Local and district agents C^ f\f\ *Am\\ _-__^yr wanted on all parts of the V^V/Cd-U %V "'^pJ Pacific Coast. .elm, wn. A ___i Mm. la a Cream Separator a paying invest- A */"*•/"_. _M_ /T^_ T MBLmaVmLA ment? If you keep cows, what la your ob /-\ _J t"T I IL. V _T_l-B____. Ject in so doing:? What system do you A kV _f^ * *■* %# II __M use to creftm your milk? What per cent. •*--•* •' mM ■■1 of the fat in the milk are you able to get _ a ___ %_9 ______ with the present system? .What to the V 1 © !______% cost in time, labor and ware? Do not wait I m\ /*T I •*% •**•% SW •X until you see how your neighbor Is going ■ ill Hr^ -_____T to make a separator pay; figure it out |___/Wll _L/-__-7W' _■_■_■__ yourself. Buy an "Eclipse Separator' at JT^ _ M _______E___H______ once and get your share of increased prof mmW^MmWsS^^'-mW' its gained by the use of a separator All /"»__ -. ______ _____._»__ *•___- At^tf »??^^__i machines guaranteed. Send for "st and CrCaiT...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 15 December 1898

16 J. F. Adams, wholesale and retail cash grocer, 512 Second avenue, Seattle, Washington, solicits your trade. Adams sells only for cash. Adams guarantees all goods he sells to be full weight and the very best quality. Adams roasts all his own coffees fresh daily, so you can always depend on getting fresh coffee when you order from Adams. Send your mail orders to J. F. Adams. Our new price list will be ready about December 15. Send for it. 25 CENTS Per pound for Adams' Best Baking Powder, guar anteed to please you. We manufacture it our selves and are satisfied with the manufacturer's profit. We save you the retailer's and wholesaler's profits. 25 CENTS For Adams' large size packages Self-Raising Buck wheat Flour. Adams' Self-Raising Buckwheat is always fresh and reliable. It is our own manu facture. 25 CENTS For %-gallon cans Adams' Sugar Syrup, full meas ure. 48 CENTS For gallon cans Adams' Sugar Syrup, full measure cans. 18 POUNDS Best American Fine Granulated Sugar for $1.00. 91...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

feNCH And Range /fIX" <&f ISSUED EVERY WEEK f|jr Vol. 4, No. 40 i Farm Dairy Implements I ml mm pg ■ CURTIS "LEVER" BUTTER WORKER. 11l 111 CURTIS "FAVORITE" BUTTER WOTKER. AjXA -^__ IS I CURTIS RECTANGULAR CHURN. CURTIS BAR CHURN WITH DOQ POWER. CURTIS "LEVER" BUTTER WORKER. mm CURTIS "FAVORITE" BUTTER WOTKER. * r== __=_-^_ IS CURTIS RECTANGULAR CHURN. CURTIS BAR CHURN WITH DOO POWER. ____________ NS y__H_________ Hwi iT_yy_^k SPi For full particulars regarding the above illustrated goods, and hundreds of other implements of a like jeA^tL ______ !§P nature, write for copy of our general catalogue of Creamery and Dairy Machinery. We are General Agents m SPl^^ljf B f^j for the DE LAVAL "ALPHA" CREAM SEPARATOR. Write for special Hand Separator Catalogue. I S^^B I &M I Columbia Implement Company Rjtf^ I fm Agricultural Implements; Creamery and Dairy /Machinery & Supplies tf^^^H____L IS || NEW MARKET BLOCK, 13 TO 27 FIRST STREET, '^Hlf^ fl S P.O. Drawer No. 26. PORTI AND O...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

2 Christmas We have just issued a catalogue of Holiday Goods for your convenience in your Christmas shopping. It contains illustrations and . descriptions of thousands of articles selected especially for Christmas gifts, including: Books, Sterling Silver Articles, Leather Goods, fletal Goods, flen,s Neckware, Stamped Linens, Gloves, Umbrellas, Handkercheifs, Toys, Candies, Etc. You take no chances when ordering from this catalogue. - We guarantee everything exactly as represented, and if you are not sat isfied with the goods, send them back and get YOUR MONEY BACK. Can anything be fairer? IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEND FOR THIS CATALOGUE. IT'S FREE. • The MacDougall & Southwick Co. ■ » JL _, STUDEBAKER WAGONS pS iJw-Wii^^-i-fS5' —-—Best in the Wor,d _!^SS^ll_tw_l_-__^__-^^^ilffi_l_SL Investigate our stock before you purchase a rig of any sort. We deal in all l^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^^^^^. kinds offarm produce, and solicit consignments Seattle Produce Co., Commercial Wharf Seattle SEATTLE F...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

RANCH AND RANGE. Vol. 4, N0.40 THE ELECT OF THE EARTH! The Dairymen of Washington Will Ride to Ellens- burg Next Monday in a Pullman. Have you noticed anything : lately in this paper about the annual meeting of the Washington State Dairymen's Association, to be held in Ellensburg next week? For fear it might have escaped your at tention I will give a few facts and figures what we will do, how we will get there and what it will cost. First, we will have the greatest time that any body of dairymen ever had, a programme that will gladden the heart of any progressive dairyman and farmer; an exchange of ideas and experiences that is worth a gold mine to any one who will benefit by them. • Second, we will strengthen the dairymen's associ ation, enabling it to do what it was organized for, protect and upbuild the dairy industry of this state; secure passage of laws that will shut out fraudulent and unfair competition and enlighten the dairymen and farmers as to the progress that is being m...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

4 stockmen of the older states. Those enterprising men are sowing good seed which is bound to produce a large harvest in a few years in educating the farm ers up to the value pf good stock. The general run of farm stock is up to the average of stock in lowa and Minnesota. There has been a new development in the creamery industry during the past year .Sev eral of the commission houses in the different cities are fitting up part of their buildings for the manu facture of cream into butter. The state of Wash ington covers a large area; 350 miles from east to west and 200 miles from north to south, so that thr farmers or ranchers in some sections are so scat tered that it is impossible for them to find sufficient cows within a given radius to justify them in build ing a creamery, as the cost of handling milk would be so great that it would be unprofitable. These scattered farmers are now making dairy butter,, some of which finds ready sale, but the most of it sells from 10c to 15c, when...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

iiaec- cities is very nattering. The value of dairy pi ouuets actui ed by tne creameries in the state in 1897 was $490,82.. In 18y8 $690,000, an in ciea_e of nearly $100,000 during the year. There are about b5,000 aairy cows in the state, at a valuation of $40 per head, would amount to $2,000,000. The figures given above are not exactly correct for the reason tnat a number of the creameries have failed to send in their report as required by the state dairy law. In those cases I have been obliged to estimate the output of their creameries. The estimates for the three cities are also not exact because a few of tne wholesale dealers failed to furnish the informa tion desired, and I was obliged in those cases to es timate the amount which they handled from inform ation from other sources. In my biennial report, which I am now preparing, the facts and figures will be as nearly as possible correct From the facts furnished in this article there is every reason for encouragement to the crea...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

6 AN ADDRESS BY W. D. HOARD. At the farmers' congress held at Fort Worth, Tex., December 6, President W. D. Hoard, who will address the dairymen of this state next week, said in part: I congratulate you also on the increased hope and encouragement that has come to the homes of the great mass of American farmers the past year. Our agriculture is becoming nationalistic. This farmers' congress is one of the proofs of this asser tion. We are no longer a loosely joined band of states, "discordant,- belligerent." Thank God, we are coming to see each other "face to face." We are becoming cemented by railroads, navigable riv ers, interchangable products, and a more general commingling of our people. National legislation is taking on thought of this kind in the establishing of experiment stations, the enactment of laws for the better protection of agricultural products against the dishonest greed of men who would adul terate and counterfeit. The march of study, investigation, knowledge, have...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

constantly present themselves, and how to keep center and circumference in harmonizing growth is the problem of the day. The railroad magnate feels it, and must bow to it. "Grim visaged war" bears no longer the same "wrinkled front," though his terrors are no less. What is this subtle power that is so mysteriously leavening the whole lump? It is growth of knowl edge among • the ' people. With knowledge comes new views of things. The Indian not inaptly de fined wisdom to be the power to "see behind a tree." To see behind some things, as well as ahead, to have a judgment as to what shall come after as a result, favorable or unfavorable, is a constant and supreme necessity in every phase of the farmers' life. No man touches the necessities of other men as does the farmer, for he must feed all the rest. Every other profession pays large respect to in tellectual power and development. Have they se crets more profound to solve than we? Have they problems more difficult to comprehend? No. ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

8 Ranch and Range ISSUED EVKBY THUBBDAY. lii the interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. PUBLISHED by TH- RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. CONDUCTED by - MILLER FREEMAN Assistant Editor - H. M. WALLACE, A. B. Editorial* Offices, - - - - Seattle, Wash. business offices: Seattle, - ' - 1 •:. 815-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. SUnSCBIPTION, IN ADVANCE, • • - ♦LOU FEB YKAK. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. lNOtwiLa-htanuiug that two meu claim to be stat. - ■ loou auu aairy coixiiiiissioner oi Oregon, not a sm fe it senator Knew wno either oi these men were wnen tne bid came up at tne special session to aboi isn mat oince. it seems our commiasioners have nut created much notoriety in their uual capacity.— .vurai spirit. touch a deplorable condition of aftaiis would not, we believe, exist ii the dairymen iheniaelves would ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

Oregon. Narcissus, tulips, crocus and fuchias grow from natural divisions and are much easier to grow but increase less rapidly. Nooksack Valley Farmers' Institute. Special Correspondence. A meeting of the farmers of the above named valley was held at Deming on Saturday, Dec. 17. At the afternoon session an address was given by J. E. Baker, Horticultural Commissioner of the state, on the adaptation of this section to horitcul tural pursuits and the need of organization. Mr. D. A. Hatfield spoke on the opportunities for enlarging the dairy business, and offered a propo sition from the firm of John W. DeCamp & Co., Seattle, to put in a power separator sufficient to handle the milk from over 200 cows, if the support of the members of the association was given, which was done after a permanent organization had been effected at the evening session. Mr. A. J. M. Hosom.'a former member of the State Board of Horticulture, gave a very interesting address in the evening on the commercial ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

10 DISCUSSION ON ORCHARD IRRIGATION. (Continued from last week.) Thompson & Stacy. North Yakima. 1. When do I irrigate? I commence in the spring, when all danger of frost is over, and I give the ground a good soaking, but at this time I do not irrigate so much close to the trees; only let the water run for, say, twelve hours. The reason for this will be seen by answer 4. As soon as the ground is well soaked round the long-reaching roots I shut the water off completely. After this I use my own judgment as to when necessary to use the water again, but I use as little water as possible. My guidance is that weeds, etc., can merely live nicely, but not thrive too much. I make it a point for such plants to wither consider ably for want of water, at any rate two days. I then do most of my irrigating next to the tree, as answer 4 will show. During the summer lam governed by the hot sun and winds as to how often and how long to let the water run. But lin no way believe in shutting water ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

ters are usually so mild that an exurberant fall growth is harmless. Nevertheless, to guard against possible severe cold, it is deemed better not to irrigate the trees late in the fall, as a new fall' growth might be severely affected by hard freezing Therefore, as a general rule, thorough winter and spring irrigation, and another irriga tion when the fruit is half grown, is deemed the wisest plan. (a) The question as to commence ment of irrigation is answered by the preceding. Likewise tbe query (b) as to shutting the water off. 2. Winter irrigation is advisable and usually easily practicable in this valley, where the ground seldom freezes enough to prevent irrigation. 3. In winter irrigation, enough water is used to thoroughly soak the ground. The amount de pends wholly upon the character of the soil; no fixed rule can be given. In Vineland, the orchard ists have all the water they want. For general irrigation " purposes a continuous minimum supply is guaranteed by the deeds of wa...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

__,• FRUIT INSPECTORS REPORT. Wnllii Will In County. Editor Ranch and Range: In doing my work, 1 have visited 360 orchards and yards where fruit trees grow in the past season. Went over the ground twice, beiore and after spraying. There are about 3,000 acres of orchard in this county, of which 1,500 acres were sprayed with the salt, sulphur and lime solution in the months of March and April. The principal pests, namely, green and woolly aphis, the San Jose scale, codlin moth, also the fire blight, has done considerable damage to the pear orchards in this valley. As to spraying for the cod lin moth, I do not believe it was done to a very great extent, as at least two-thirds of the apples in the lower part of the valley were wormy. The or chards in the foothills and mountains are in a meas ure clear of them. There are some orchards so sit uated in the hills that they are shaded after 5 o'clock in -the evening. . These are clear of the moth. As to my observation in regard to fighting t...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 22 December 1898

HARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. Trade is very quiet in the produce mar ket for this time of the year. Apples still show scarcely any improve ment. _„_ Apples—Fancy. 75c@$l; very fancy, $1® 1.50; apples, cooking, 35@65c. To quote them in another way, they are: Waxen apples, 40®60c; Greenings, 50®60c; Belleflower. 50c@$l; King, 50e@$l; Spitzen berg, 75c@51.50; Baldwin, 50c@$l;. Gloria Mundi. 40®50c. r-.'.i dJ-fr'Vi *n™> Yakima, potatoes—Two or three car loads of frozen Yakima potatoes came in this last week. These are going at any price to get rid of them. _.--.■.„• Potatoes—Native Burbanks, $16(0-8. Pears—Winter Nellies, $1@1.50; ordinary, 50@75c. _«-■*■_ : __. Celery. 40c per doz; lettuce, 10c; hothouse lettuce, 40c; onions, silverskins, 50@80c; cab bage, 1(3)1 _sc per lb for native; parsnips, 75c per sack. . ' , , Cauliflower, 50c@$l per -doz; turnips, 50c per sack; Merced sweets, 194<__c; carrots, 50c per sack; beets, 75c per sack; cranber ries, $7@9 per bbl; pumpkins, %c; squash, C...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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