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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

Farm Bureau Vol. 55, No. 3 Va. chicken goes to 43 countries and still counting By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor NORFOLK—A few days ago, a ship left Norfolk with tons of frozen poultry and headed for the Far East. The ship—longer than three football fields—will dock in China in about 30 days. The ship will return to Norfolk in about 75 days after traveling to countries around the world with Virginia poultry. A similar ship arrives each Friday or Saturday and leaves eight hours later with a load ofVirginia poultry. The poultry export business is big in Virginia and has grown from 46 million pounds of poultry in 1987 to 201 million pounds last year. Virginia's poultry industry has a payroll of about $224 million. While on the ship, chicken and turkey products remain at 0 degrees Fahrenheit inside dozens of refrigerated containers, even as the 965-foot ship travels through the Caribbean. The containers are trailers from 18-wheel tractor-trailer rigs, 1 HET /VT. Sff* ,£Cut * i N /r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

2 Va. farmers win approval of agricultural programs By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor RICHMOND—QuietIy and without fanfare, Virginia agriculture achieved some major goals in the 1996 session of the General Assembly. Financial victories such as increased funding for agricultural research programs, retaining four Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services programs and a state unemployment insurance exemption for alien H-2A workers were all approved by the legislature. On the environmental front, farmers won approval of a Farm Bureau-support-ed Agricultural Stewardship program and a state income tax credit for Best Management Practices. Other victories included an increase in the legal size of cotton modular haulers and other trucks and trailers, a number of anti-tobacco bills were killed or carriedover, and land-use assessment laws were retained. "I'd like to congratulate all our Farm Bureau members for their hard work in this session of the General Assembly," said C. W...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Virginia Farm Bureau gets onto the World Wide Web Want to know which agricultural commodities bring in the most revenue to Virginia? Are you interested in learning more about what your $40 membership dues will get you? Would you like to find out how Ag in the Classroom helps teach Virginia students? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation web site on the Internet may be just the route for you. We can be reached at http:// www.fb.rom/Virginia_state/home.htm. Virginia was the third Farm Bureau state in the nation to create a home page on the World Wide Web. We hope in the very near future to make our page even more of an ag-relat-ed resource for Internet users. This web site serves as an electronic forum to tell the Farm Bureau story. Small farms may be excluded from ag census On paper, two-thirds of the farms in Virginia would disappear through a bit of bureaucratic sleight of hand if the U.S. secretary of com- merce has his ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

4 General Assembly adopts tax credit for farmers (Continued from Page 2) a farmer spends on implementing stateapproved Best Management Practices, starting in 1998. BMPs can include new equipment purchases to switch to no-till planting, building sod waterways and grass filter strips and other techniques for preserving the soil and preventing runoff. Farm Bureau members have sought financial help in this area for years. The maximum tax credit available would be about $17,500 per farmer per tax year, Stoneman said, but farmers could spread tax credits out over five years. State officials estimated the tax credit would cost the treasury about $500,000 the first year it is permitted, and $1.7 million dollars in tax credits could be used by farmers in the second fiscal year before usage tapers off. Transportation bills roll through Farm tractors and equipment would have no mileage restrictions when traveling from field to field under a bill sponsored by Del. Dickinson and passed by lawmak...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Young farmers benefit from networking with others Farming is a lot like religion. If you're religious, but never go to church, your faith may be enough for a while. But without the support of a church, your beliefs may soon falter. Farming without belonging to a supportive farm organization is similar. You can be a young farmer without belonging to the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' Committee, but you won't be as effective. We have been involved with the Halifax County Young Farmers' Committee for six years, and we've found that the experience has made us better farmers. For example, we've been able to improve our operation's recordkeeping after attending financial workshops at several young farmer leadership conferences. We learned tips on making our records easier to keep, as well as to follow. We've also become more safety-conscious after participating in several safety workshops sponsored by Farm Bureau. We weren't aware of the importance of having shi...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

6 1995 Farm Bill to reauthorize all major programs From AFBF, VFBF Staff Reports WASHINGTON—After more than a year of proposals, wrangling, negotiations and headaches, the House on Feb. 29 completed work on the already overdue 1995 Farm Bill. The measure passed by a vote 0f270 to 155, with 10 ofVirginia's 11 representatives voting in favor of the final passage. Only Rep. Jim Moran, D-Bth, voted against the measure. If approved by the House-Senate conferees and then by President Clinton, the bill would reauthorize through 2002 all major federal farm programs. It would replace current crop support programs with a system of fixed annual payments to farmers that would decline over the next seven years. It would give farmers more flexibility in planting, ending decades of production limits for the nation's major grain crops. It would also extend the peanut program's quota system and phase out price supports for butter and dry milk. Farm Bureau applauded the House move, saying although th...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Half of Virginia's chicken exports go to Asia (Continued from Page 1) increase from last year's 162 million pounds to 215 million pounds this year, said Robert Rich, director of international marketing for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Wampler Longacre Turkey, Inc. is Virginia's largest exporter of poultry. It accounts for about 40 percent of the state's poultry exports, Rich said Rocco represents 30 percent, followed by Tyson Foods, Inc. at 20 percent and Perdue Farms, Inc. at 10 percent. Over half ofVirginia poultry exports go to Asia, and China was the No. 1 recipient in 1995, Rich noted. Half of the state's turkey exports go to Mexico. As an industrial revolution sweeps over China, workers are leaving farms to take factory jobs. Per capita income has risen about 10 percent each year in parts of China, beginning in the mid 1980s. Some 50 million Chinese households have an annual income of at least $10,000 a year, according to the U.S. De...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

8 ' ? '*****• ■Sw#* i / Jr iw w " **■ rJHkfl&ciLJßi j| jhh w li jotl U.S. Sen. John Warner meets with the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's women's delegation in Washington. The delegation of 200 also met with U.S. Sen. Charles Robb during a March 3-5 conference. The senators answered questions about the national budget, pesticide residues and federal wetlands regulations. Women's group questions senators By NORM HYDE VFBF Broadcast Editor ARLINGTON—What could be more American than a visit to the nation's capital, a tour of the national cemetery and several war memorials, and a lobbying trip to Capitol Hill? Patriotism is the focus for the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Women's program this year and Washington was the choice for the Women's Conference March 3-5. The highlight of the conference for many was a visit to the Senate Russell Building and a private meeting with Sen. John Warner, R-Va., and Sen. Charles Robb, D-Va. The House of Representatives had just passed t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Teens get hands-on experience in state government By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor They could have studied state government in the classroom, but instead, the children of two Farm Bureau leaders rolled up their sleeves and went to work for the Virginia General Assembly. Rebekah Lynn Vaughan and Thane Wallace Everett, both 13, spent nine weeks as legislative pages. Rebekah worked under Del. Glenn R. Croshaw, D-Virginia Beach. Thane assisted Del. J. Paul Councill Jr., D-Southampton County. "I got to see how everything works around here," Thane said, sitting in a lobby of the General Assembly building. "I got to meet the delegates and famous people like the governor." "The legislators seem to get along better here than portrayed in the media," Rebekah noted. "I really like seeing how they joke around. They can be real serious about their job, but they can joke around too." Rebekah is the daughter of Nancy and Eddie Vaughan, who is president of the Virginia Beach Farm B...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

10 Expert explains ways to prevent house fires By CHRIS BAXTER Staff Writer and Designer "If only I had" —those are among the saddest words, especially when referring to accidental house fires. Accidental fires cost the Virginia Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company thousands of dollars every year. A common household appliance, such as a curling iron, can cause a house fire that results in an average of $50,000 to $100,000 in damage. "We're busier now than we've ever been since Fve been here," said Frank Dunton, supervisor of VFB's Special Investigations Unit, who has been with the organization for more than 18 years. Although the unit also investigates cases of fraud and arson, investigations of accidental fires consume much of their time. A respect for cooking and heating devices is crucial in reducing risk of injury or financial loss from fire, explained Dunton, who is the fire safety instructor for the Virginia State Police, Virginia Forensic Science Academy, and the Department o...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Teamwork results in FB success (Continued from Page 2) ideas that will place Virginia farmers in the forefront of competition in U.S. and world markets in the 21st century. Lawmakers realized this wise investment will pay dividends in the future and improve the overall economy of Virginia. The important aspect of this appropriation is that it becomes part of the annual base budget of these centers in the future. Legislators enacted the Agricultural Stewardship program and the Best Management Practices program. These pro-farmer measures address agricultural water quality concerns and encourage farmers to address environmental problems. The ag stewardship law is complaintdriven, investigated on the local level, administered by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and has flexible BMP application. A few farmers may need to clean up their operations and this program probably will prod them to do so. In the long run, this program will keep unnecessary r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

12 Enliven a sleepy scene with vibrant poppies Wake up to the bright colors of poppies. The lovely silken flowers that characterize members of the poppy family can really dress up sections of a flower bed. Among the annual poppies, corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas), the famous scarlet poppy from Flanders fields, can be sown directly in fertile soil as the last snow melts. Along with its readily available relative, the Shirley poppy, a stand of corn poppy will bloom profusely from June through July. Consider setting the low-growing perennial, Alpine poppy (Papaver alpinum) between paving stones or in a rock garden. The small, white, yellow or orange blossoms show up against its gray-green leaves. The flamboyant blossoms of Oriental poppy (P. orientale) make it an old favorite for perennial plantings. It blooms for only a few weeks, but its intense pink, orange, red or white flowers can bring select spots in a flower border to life in early summer. In spring, young Oriental poppy plants are...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 Beef Expo scheduled for April 26-28 HARRISONBURG —Cattle sales, country music, a cook-off and exhibits will highlight the Virginia Beef Expo scheduled for April 26-28 at the Rockingham County Fairgrounds. The expo will feature the sale of Limousin, Angus, Simmental, Red Angus and Polled Hereford on Friday, April 26, and Shorthorn, Charolais, Salers and Commercial Replacement Eastern Shore county leads soybean production RICHMOND— Accomack County on Virginia's Eastern Shore led the state in soybean production following the hot, dry summer of 1995. Farmers there harvested 1.09 million bushels of soybeans, according to the Virginia Agricultural Statistics Service. Chesapeake producers followed closely behind by harvesting 1.07 million bushels, the VASS said. Production levels dropped significantly from those two localities. Westmoreland County on the Northern Neck was a distant third with 510,000 bushels, followed by Virginia Beach with 453,800 bushels, Women's group asks se...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

14 (A Free Service to Members) Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words in Single letters or figures and groups of figures ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 10th of each month. For the May issue, the deadline is April 10. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each issue in which they will appear. (Please fill in this classified ad form and send to the Farm Bureau News before the 10...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

April 1996 High grain prices hurt cattlemen LEXINGTON —A short crop last year has boosted prices for corn, wheat and soybeans to near record highs for several months, putting smiles on the faces of Virginia grain producers. But Virginia's largest farm sector is livestock, and the rest ofVirginia's farm economy may not fare so well in 1996, according to Dr. Wayne Purcell, a professor of agricultural economics at Virginia Tech. "Grain is the major feed cost in several of our commodity areas, especially poultry and swine. If s a problem, but maybe not quite as extreme" in the daiiy sector, Purcell told Virginia Farm Bureau Federation members attending a recent commodity committee meeting. 'It will have a big ripple effect." High feed costs are hurting Midwest cattle feeders tremendously, and that will only lengthen the downturn in Virginia cattle prices, predicted John Richman, a Shenandoah County cattleman and chairman of the VFBF Livestock Committee. "We have a very depressed market....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 April 1996

And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products of Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary J. I 1 I* f\ health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Corporation is an ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau w a Volume 55, Number 4 Farmers are protecting environment By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Vernon Moyer kneeled in a lush green field of alfalfa, looking for weevils. His hand waved slowly through the alfalfa plants on the family's chicken and grain farm. He and his father, David, and mother, Nancy, own and operate a 500-acre farm in Powhatan County and cash-rent three other farms. After a quick search, Vernon had two tiny beetle larvae in the palm of his hand. Even this simple procedure is a part of Best Management Practices, which are environmentconscious practices that reduce soil erosion and improve water quality. By checking first for pests before routinely spraying for pests, the Moyers can reduce the amount of pesticides used or even eliminate spraying. BMPs include construction of sod waterways and use of no-till planting, which requires special (See Environment, Page 8) Vernon Moyer holds in his hand tiny beetle larvae that damage altalfa plants. He check...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News Congressman supports private property rights By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor GORDONSVILLE—Landowners should receive compensation when government regulations devalue their property, U.S. Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr., R-7th, told farmers in April. All of the state's II congressmen met with Virginia Farm Bureau leaders in March and April. Each year, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation sponsors congressional district meetings to discuss important issues affecting farmers. Leaders focused on private property rights, pesticide use, estate taxes, the Endangered Species Act, the capital gains tax and the federal unemployment tax. David Amstutz of Spotsylvania County told Bliley that Farm Bureau supports legislation protecting the rights of private property owners against laws and regulations affecting property values. When laws limit the use of property, then the landowner should receive compensation, he added. The Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution contains a "ju...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

May 1996 Just one vote makes a difference in elections Thomas Jefferson lost his bid for president of the United States by three votes in the electoral college in 1 796. Four years later, Jefferson ran again and tied his opponent in the electoral college, and Congress chose Jefferson. Rutherford B. Hayes was elected president by one vote in the electoral college. The man who had cast the deciding vote for President Hayes was himself elected to Congress by a margin of one vote. That one vote was cast by a voter who, though desperately ill, insisted on being allowed to vote. Closer to home, Robert Speas, defeated four opponents by one vote for a seat on the Powhatan County Board of Supervisors in 1992. Speas is a Virginia Farm Bureau Federation board member. Countless mayors, legislators, councilmen and other public officials have enjoyed sweet victory or bitter defeat by a U.S. agriculture exports find Asian buyers U.S. agricultural counselor Michael Humphrey can hardly wait to share...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 May 1996

Farm Bureau News asste*. ST.:-' Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a ton of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM EUREAIf MEMBERS. As if our Magnum® engine series, overall the most powerful line of pickup engines on the planet, wasn't enough incentive for Farm Bureau members, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1996 5.9 L Magnum V-8 Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups, $500 back on all 1996 Cummins diesel-powered America's Truck Stop Ram and Ram Club Cab pickups ... and $500 back on select mid-size 1996 Dakota pickups. The offer includes all 1996 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge cash back offer.* All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. ♦This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 9/30/96, and may not be used in comb...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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