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Title: Pacific Rural Press Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Terms Used in Describing Fruits. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Terms Used in Describing Fruits. , Tho frequent uso of descriptive terms, applied to trees and fruits, render them useful and interesting to the mass of our readers, as we design them to be. Catyx—the remains of the flower left at tho end opposite the stem. Iliisin—tho depression around tho calyx. Crown or Summit—tho ridge surrounding the calyx. Stem— the part connecting tho fruit to twig of tho tree. Base—tho part most remoto from tho crown. Core—tho cavities in the center of the fruit containipg tho seeds. » Core surroundings—the dim lines In tne flesh, which partly or wholly surround the core. Flesh—the edible portion of the fruit.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
AGRICULTURAL NOTES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

AGRICULTURAL NOTES. CALIFORNIA. The Fruit Chop appears to be promising an abundant yield in every part of the State, affording good evidence that this crop,'at least, is independent of our exceptional season of drought. The Folsom Telegraph says the fruit and ■grape crops in that vicinity never looked The Vallejo Chronicle says that Solano 4iml Napa counties, renowned for thoir •orchard and vino productions, will produce :an abundance of fruit to reward the pomolivist and viniculturist this season. No frost has blighted the blossoms, nor has curled leaf mado its appearance, so far as heard from. The Mendocino Democrat says many of the early fruit trees in this vicinity present a very promising appearanco; and in some localities apricots have assumed a very sizeable dimension. Similar reports reach us from all the fruit producing portions of the State. The Haying Season has commenced, and many grain fields will bo treated as " grass." The high price of hay, now #20 to $24 por ton, wi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Oregon.—A Want of Our Coast. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Oregon.—A Want of Our Coast. There is a State lying to the north of us which has an area as large as that of the States of New York and Pennsylvania combined, but with a population of a little over one per cent, of that of these two States. It has good society, numerous and excellent schools and churches, and offers manifold inducements for immigration. Its growth, although slow, has been steady and healthy, without wild speculations or financial crises to any great extent. Its climate is, varied, generally most pleasant and healthy and in some places unsurpassed. Its arable land is sufficient to support a million of people. The agricultural productions of its soil are many, and the fertility of the land very great. Fruits of nearly every description are raised with success. For the stock-raiser there is an abundance of excellent grazing land. Its timber is of immense extent and of the best quality for manufacturing and other purposes. Oregon is also rich in mineral. Its placer mine...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HOME AND FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

HOME AND FARM.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Native California Lupines—The Castor Bean, Etc. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Native California Lupines—The Castor Bean, Etc. Editors Peess:—There appears to be much interest among tho "book-farmers" of the East concerning the lupines—a plant much used in some parts of Exirope for green manuring, also for fodder, and is found especially excellent for sheep. From all the testimony it certainly stands high. (Sonietimes/ow/et7; only think of plowing under such a growth for manure!) Now I believe it grows wild all over California. Cannot some of your wideawake subscribers tell us all about it? There certainly is a species of lupine flourishing in hundreds of waste places, and it seems exactly to fill the bill. I once protected a few of them in my orchard for the beauty of the blossoms; but soon found they were for "squatting" all over my land, so I immediately commenced suit of ejectment. Before I had learned its name, I concluded it would be valuable to cover up dry, sandy, unsightly places, as it seemed to flourish where nothing else could gain a foothold. Poss...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Hints to Farmers. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Hints to Farmers. [Written for the Pbebb.] Scabby sheep are best doctored soon after shorn, but any time when the liquid is applied to the pelt to kill the scab. It is not a bad policy to scorify the worst points of attack, by an instrument that will scratch or cut the hide partially. This instrument can be made out of the bow of a pair of old sheep shears by filing in notches; but the more effectual modo is to set sharp-pointed instruments in a flat piece of wood, the points only to project not more than one-eighth of an inch; set onefonrth of an inch apart, about six in number; draw these points over but once; it makes an opening for the material applied to work under the hide and kill the insects that create the sore; that tobacco water is a safe and sure remedy, but petroleum in small quanties, or kerosine, will do the job effectually and cheaply. Shrubs, Small Trees, Scions. When you have a package of small trees, or any woody plant arrive in a shrivoled condition, immerse them...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Population of San Francisco. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Population of San Francisco. Mr. Langley has replied to the reply of Mr. W. G. Morris (U. S. Marshal) to the strictures of Mr. Langloy on the U. S. Census. Mr. Laugloy defends the accuracy of his Directory, and answers certain challenges to publish a number of names omitted in the census, by publishing many more names than asked for. On one point both gentlemen agree,—in the enumeration of the Chinese. We think that Mr. Langloy shows that tho returns of the census were too small. We would not assert that Mr. Langley's returns were absolutely correct. But then we can only judge concerning the arguments advanced on either side, for the careful examination and compilation of such statistics is a job too largo for our hands and one which we must leave to others. The matter is perhaps not yot settled to the satisfaction of the public. Tho popular belief is, so far as we can ascertain, that the census is too low and tho Directory too high. Tho census takers could have no object in giving ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Olympic Games—The Ancient Greeks. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

The Olympic Games—The Ancient Greeks. Tho ewliest and most famous of games woro those celebrated at Olyinpia, a plain in the territory of Elis, in Ancient Greece, and in tho inimediato vicinity of the celebrated temple of Jupiter. The origin M the games is lost in tho mists of antiquity. Tho spot where they were celebrated was sacred ground; and so sacred and universal was their celebration that whatever war raged at the time of their occurrence, between the different territories of Greece, a truce was proclaimed in soason for all to attend them, and the combatants, even, met as friends in friendly contest. Tho games continued live days. Spectators attended from all parts of tho then known world; but those only of pure Hellenic blood were allowed to enter tho lists, until after the Roman conquest, when Homan citizens also wero allowed to enter. The place where the games wero celebrated was called tho Stadium, and consisted of a slightly elevated mound of earth, upon which wero also ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Greek we Speak. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

The Greek we Speak. tprof Martin Kellogg before tho Mechanic Aiith o<>lSlbo'e Mechanics' Intttituto Hall, H. F. Fourth Series. Imported expreasly for tho Pbehh.] Lbot. 111. May 6.—Having spoken in the preceding lecture of the Latin element in the English language, Professor Kellogg was led naturally to consider next the Greek element. That the latter is not so important as tho former in colloquial English, is not to be wondered at. Not, however, because the Greek language was so much older than the Latin and had already lost a part of its vitality before the formation of tho English language began. It would be nearer tho truth to say that Latin and Greok were cotemporaneous,— that they sustained the relative of sisters rather than that of mother and daughter. But in Western Europe—the homo of nearly all tho original occupants or conquerors of tho British isles—Greek was never so potent as Latin. Athens founded no worldompiro. Greek was not carried across the Al...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Cut-worms Destroying Grape Vines. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Cut-worms Destroying Grape Vines. The greenish gray cut-worms, sometimes called the corn-worms, are, in some places, making great havoc among the grape vines. J. P. Odbert, near Brighton, Sacramento county, informs us that two weeks ago, his vineyard was in splendid order and gave promise of an abundant crop of grapes. Since that time the cut-worms have attacked the vines and are eating the young shoots and leaves so rapidly that he has almost dospaired of any crop at all, unless the vines shall throw new fruit-buds and make a second crop. They climb up the body of the vine in the night and eat all they can, and then, letting loose, fall to the ground and lay during the day just below the surface, and so repeat this operation each night and day. Mr. O. has tried various experiments to stop the destruction, but with poor success. He has thrown ashes and lime around the roots, but the worms will hide themselves under these the same as in the oil. Cole tar put around the body of the vi...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Activity of Vesuvius. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

The Activity of Vesuvius. Dr. Colton writes to the Boston Transcript, from Naples, under date of March Bth: Last evening, as we came home from the opera, we saw the grandest spectacle yet presented by Vesuvius. A vast flame, or what appeared such, was issuing from the new crater, and the lava in two streams was pouring down the sides of the cone. Both these streams, I should judge, were five hundred feet wide. Looking across the bay in one direction we saw in the rippling water the red light reflected from Vesuvius, and in another the white light of the moon. The effect was strikingly beautiful. The lava as iron heated to a white heat, and the clouds of smoke and surrounding air were tinged with the red reflection. Two ladies at our hotel visited Vesuvius to-day, and could only get as far as the Hermitage. They said a stream of lava was flowing directly toward them, and the constant thundering from the old crater was fearful. A stone over two feet in diameter was thrown out and land...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Fat vs. Lean People. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Fat vs. Lean People. Leanness, at least in the earlier ages, has been considered a reproach, rather than a merit, either in an individual or a nation. Pharaoh's lean kine were never held up as models to the graziers of any age or any country. Brutus was not so very much in the wrong when he entertained doubts about "that Cassius" with his lean and hungry look. The point of one of the bitterest of the many epigrams shot at Voltaire is blunted and rendered harmless by translation into a language where " death and sin "do not rhyme to "thin." We cannot fancy a fat Macbeth, a corpulent traitor in Venice preserved, or an obese lago are impossibilities. Assuredly, Falstaff was not scrupulously honest or honorable; but what was he, after all, but a merry rogue? Plumpness and beauty have been regarded as inseparable Siamese twins, from the illustrious regent whose ideal of female loveliness was summoned up in "fat, fair and forty," to the Egyptians who fattened their dames systematically by...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Dyspepsia. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Dyspepsia. Dr. A. O'Leary lectured recently at Cooper Institute, N. V., on "Dyspepsia." "Indications of the disturbances of the stomach, are," he said, "caused by the fermentation of food. No one should eat cabbage boiled with meat, or onions with the stalks, as they create billiousness. Cabbage is one of the best articles of food when properly cooked. It should be boiled in pure water. As a'cure for dyspepsia a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, which neutralizes the acid ia the stomach is recommended. The causes of dyspepsia are the use of butter, grease, gravy, and eating hastily. Dyspepsia does not come from large eating. Those afflicted with it should take a short sleep after dinner. The liver has much to do with dyspepsia. Whenever the white of the eye shows a yellow tinge, it proceeds from the liver; tenderness in the pit of the stomach is an indication of a diseased liver. A slight pain under the right ribs and back to the shoulder blade, also proceeds from the liver. Those t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What Goes into Your Stomach. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

What Goes into Your Stomach. "I have often wondered what the stomach must say to itself while an ordinary meal is coming down. This stomach knows perfectly well what it needs. It asks at breakfast a moderate piece of steak, a slico or two of pood bread, and a baked potato. Now, just stand by and see what goes down. First, a great mass of greasy buckwheat cakes, now a swash of scalding hot coffee, again buckwheats, more coffee, sausage, hot biscuit saturated with melted butter, buckwheats, coffee sausage, hot biscuit, and so on and so on for half an hoHr. And here we have an enormous mass of hot, greasy, doughy, indigestible stuff swimming in hot coffee. The stomach asks at dinner roast beef or mutton, with bread, potatoes and other vegetables. Now, what is the conglomeration that comes rushing down that red canal. Turtle soup, fish, beef, duck, plum pudding, pie, nuts, raisins, coffee, and several' condiments: with this hotch-potch, ice water, ice cream, and wine. For supper the sto...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

Our Weekly Crop. The wool business is certain to be most important in our State, and we present our readers with a specimen of the Cotswold Sheep, the best breed for wool and mutton as a general thing. This will be Exhibited at the Fairs, the advantages of which proceedure are here touched on. From this point of view our readers get a glance at some Rural Homes. Our library of Mechanical and Scientific Progress is found tilled with new and interesting matter. Close at hand are found articles concerning three matters of great importance to us: Irrigation (as practiced in Northern Italy), the Cinchona Tree in California, and Our Water Supply. Passing on to our Poultry Yard, we find some choice notes from our choice poultry. Walking about the Farm, we see the Necessity of Irrigation, and learn How to Save Mustard Seed. Ascending an eminence, we review the Agricultural Notes of the Coast, and examine into the Needs of Oregon. California Lupines and Castor Beans are growing abundantly ar...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

University of the Pacific.—The Ninth Annual Announcement of the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific is at hand. This institution, with its very able instructors and many advantages, is now, and ha 3 been, exercising an ever growing influence and making itself a credit to our city. Among its graduates are names of physicians who, although comparatively young, are earning high and well deserved reputations. The Santa Clara Agricultural Society will commence its next annual exhibition on the 28th of August, and continues five days. Annexation of Dominica.—To the Honorable Cornelius Cole we are indebted for a copy of his able speech before Congress in favor of this project. Our Chapter for May came to hand too late for insertion last week, and we give it a place in to-day's issue.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Beet Sugar Interest. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

The Beet Sugar Interest. The 000 acres of sugar boots at Alvarado promise a fair crop. Tho scanty rains will no doubt lessen the production; but the soil is a rich, dark loam and holds considerable moifture. Rating the crop at 20 tons to tho acre and tho sugar content at 8 per cent., wo have 12,000 tons of beets and nearly 1,000 tons of sugar. Counting 3c per ft. profit, which is safe, we have $60,000 profit on an investment of §125,000. Tho experience of one season gives assurance that our figures will not vary much from realization. Let it bo understood that out friends at Alvarado are perfect masters of sugar-making. From tho word "go," thero has been no balk and no mistake in the working of their sugarie; and no sugar in the world excels theirs in public favor or in market valuation. Between crops, the Alvarado sugario is not idle. With small outlay, it has been temporarily converted into a refinery of crude imported sugar. That product is now in market and it is not excelled by...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Silk Eggs from Japan. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 13 May 1871

The Silk Eggs from Japan. The 130,000 cards of silkworm eggs sent to this market from Japan, leavo a record that will not invite further consignments. Here there is no markot. Wo have a surplus of our own without an export demand. One of our mulberry planters made a considerable shipment to Europe as a venture, of which wo have yet no returns. The disturbed condition of Franco forbids hope in that direction. Italy wants eggs; but our supplies have not yet any standard reputation. Success has not beon uniform. Japanese eggs, though vouched for by tho seals of that government, are not true to their labels. Wo havo yet no reliable means of retarding tho hatching of eggs till leaf time. As a rule, our home supply has begun to hatch this year, prematurely; and the French annuals, which mako tho best cocoons, have proved unhealthy in many localities. Italian experts say this is duo to defective management in tho nurseries whore tho worms are hatched. New coiners from Italy, who have taken...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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