ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Great Southern Advocate Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 14,999 items from Great Southern Advocate, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
14,999 results
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

WELSBACH THE WORLD'S BEST FOR-COUNTRY LIGHTING. Air Gas Machines. The Welshach Air Gas Ma chine Is so sim pie that a child can work It ■with impunity, Suitablo for Lighting, Heat ing and Cook ing. We guar antee satisfac tion with all our Machines, and to prove this we will put .a machine in for one month free of charge, and if not suit able, will remove same free of all cost to you. Write for Catalogue. WELSBACH LIGHT COMPANY OF AUSTRALASIA LIMITED, 380 T/DNSDAIIE ST.. UBI,BOURNTE.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE NUTMEG. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

THE NUTMEG. The titittneg is the kernel of the (rult of several species of trees grow ifig 'Wllil in Asia, Africa, ::n<l America, fhe cultivated Irm H Frcia ■ fl/ty to severity feet high, ami ;rfcdu iOS frtllt for sixty years. The fruit is jf the size nn<l appearance of a round lah pear, yell on* 1 ti color. The nrshJ part of the fruit is r.ither hard and ra sembles candied citron. Within it the nut, enveloped in a curious yd . tonish-rcct aril known to ns as uiacs. To prepare the seeds for use. the? ire dried in a moderate heat for about • two months. Then the she!!.-? arc broken and the nnlme.es picked out md assorted, the inferior ones being reserved for the oil-press. As the es sential oil of nutmeg; brings a high price, dishonest growers often steep . £fte nutmegs in hot water to extract . the oil from thein. They are then coated with lime and sent into thf channels of commerce. f Such nutmegs are worthless, thel« aroma and pungency have disappeared, . ihe...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SPEECHES MADE TO ORDER. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

SPEECHES MADE TO ORDER. A little, quiet, book-lined office in the heart of the West End o£ London is occupied by a gentleman who Is prepared to turn out speeches for all occasions. During a recent interview the Epeeclnnaker-in-chief remarked that, while speeches have often been written by others than those who de liver them, he thinks his is the first attempt 'to concentrate the supply and to establish the new profession of gentleman speechmaker. 'I am as ready with an after-dinner speech as any other," he said. "They can be bright or serious ns required, and I have already prepared a good many speecnes which have been de livered with success in different parts of the country. 'Impromptus' are a specialty. . . • "The method is simple enough. T ask clients to supply me with any lo cal allusions they require, and an idea, if they have one, of the trend of the speech. The rest they can letve to me. I have made a practice of attending all the functions T could for years past, so I know ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

'A0 SEWING MACHINES A Good Sawing Machlna faya far ItaaKI ~ Don't pay a fancy prlca (or your maohlntl .WARD TIROS, sell direct to yoxi at the lowest poi* ■ ' sible price—pay frc'ght to your station Aad absolute*.y guarantee their machine* tor 2$ ye%r»» I You can't do better than that—a:ul you can't get • better machine for love or innuey. Write (•* Illustrated Catalog—I'ost tree. Machiues of all make* repaired, ; Needles aud ParU supplied lor any 36-38 ERROL STREET IVORTH MELBOURNE. • «•

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SECRET NAVAL CODE BOOK. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

SECRET NAVAL CODE BOOK. Few things are so jealously guarded as the secret code book of the Uni ted States Navy. It is a 'book of sig nals—not the ordinary "wig-wag" sig nals used in the daily direction of the fleet by a commanding ofllccr—but a code of signals to be used' solely in time of Avar and in the /presence of an enemy. ' - These secret code books are issued only to the executive officers of a ship, who are enjoined to protect them against theft by every possible means. These books nre threatened not so much by the ordinary thief as by secret emissaries of other Govern ments who desire to obtain knowledge of what the battleships would do in time of action. Governments have no scruples against theft in such cases. The loss of one of these secret code books by an officer, unless explained to the entire satisfaction of the Sec retary of the Navy, would mean court martial and probable expulsion from the service. To the honor of the United States Service, no officer has ever yet ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MISSION OF FLOWERS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

THE MISSION OF FLOWERS. ? Mr. Rider Haggard as a novelist has thrilled thousands, but never, j perhaps, did his pen do better work than when it formed the following words, constituting, as they do, an enthusiastic and an effective "appre ciation" of flowers:— - "I adore flowers," says some lady., contemplating a bouquet of orchids or prize chrysanthemums that others have raised at her expense. But she never watched the wonder of their growth; she'never saw the shoot start' to life; or the pseudo-bulb form; or day by day the flower spike ma ture. All that such a one cares for is the;blaze of color when it comes, if even she really cares for this. With those who love the flowers, who, whatever their opportunities, are gar deners born, it is otherwise. The poor woman, for example, worn out with want, a dweller, perhaps, in the grimy slum of some vast city, who. nurtures on the window-sill of her one room a cactus or a rose cut ting. When the cactus opens it3 gorgeous dazzling cup, whit...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A PLACE FOR HIS HEART." [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

/a pl/cce for his heart." "I married you in order to love yon in God and according to the need of my heart, and in order to have in th<* midst of the strange world a placo for my heart, which all the world's bleak winds cannot chill, and where I may find the warmth of the home fire, to which I eagerly betake mysolf when it is stormy and cold without." Can you imagine whose words are these? Perhaps you might say tlioy were written by some lovesick senti mentalist; but you would mistake. They are found in the "Love Letters of Prince Bismarck," which have just been published, and from their am ple pages you could cull a hundred similar passages. There are many different judgments of Prince Bis marck current in the world to-day, but there cannot be two opinions as to the purity and depth of his affec tion for his wife. Proba<bly she was the greatest single force that ever entered his life. She does not seem to have been an intellectual or a brilliant woman, but she...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORLD. HINTS TO MOTHERS. Some Useful Suggestions About the Care and Training of Children. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

WOMAN'S WORLD. HINTS TO MOTHERS; Some Useful Suggestions About the Care and Training of Children. All children possess imagination in a greater or less degree, and in the management of the nursery this facul ty may be ranked among the import ant ones. In trifling matters, where no real principle is involved I always consider the easiest way the best way, as, for instance, this morning, when my three-year-old girlie took it into her head not to be dressed as usual and curling her tiny pink toes be neath her gown, declaring miscliiev osuly she wouldn't have any 'tock in's on at all." For a minute I was nonplussed. Baby had not ben well for soveral days and was just in the humor to rebel vigorously against enforce'! obedience. Papa was in the sound morning sleep that benefits a night worker, a cry must be avoided if pos sible, so, as a thought struck me, 1 held the small stocking invitingly open and said pleasantly, "The naugh ty little food said it wouldn't go into this stocking, but ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PATTERN FOR LADY'S RUSSIAN COAT. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

PATTERN FOR LADY'S RUSSIAN COAT. Made up In dark velvet trimmed with fur, this coat will look very sty lish and most up-to-date. It repre sents "Everylady's Journal" pattern isj. 197, cut In three sizes—small, me dium and large. This pattern "may he bought for ninepcnco from local pattern agent, or will bo sent post free to any address if ninepence in stamps is sent to Dept. "A." "Every lady's Journal," 37G Swanston-street, Melbourne. State number of pattern and size required. If a penny stamp is sent to above address a 4S-page catalogue will be sent to any reader who writes "Send free catalogue." The first word of the law Is good breeding, as the last is kindness. The Golden Rule contains the last word' 011 manners. The model husband is not yet ex tinct. There are still many wives who belfeve jn him, but, alas! he in variably belongs to the other woman.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ALLOWANCES. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 28 May 1914

ALLOWANCES. An excellent idea, and one that is steadily growing in favor, is tlie cus tom of allowing quite young girls a fixed sum for their small current ex penses, permitting 'full liberty in th? expenditure, but requiring a strict ac counting in a business-like form at stated periods. No better metho'l could possibly be devised to teach the ; true value of money and instil cor rect business habits; and practical financial ability will not come amiss, whatever the future lot may be, whe ther as a wife or a member of the maiden sisterhood. Not that the mat ter of mere saving is so important, but the systematic habits formed in this particular will have an undoubted effect on all the other habits as weli. There are a number of young ladies in this city, belonging to wealthy families, who manage property and with marked ability. The father of one of these presented her, on lier twenty-first birthday, with the deed of a house in the business part of the city, on the condition that sh...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MILD MYSTERIES. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

MILD MYSTERIES. An army surgeon recently visited the site of a proposed camping-ground in order to report upon its sanitary fitness for occupation during manoeu vres. He was in such a liurry, how ever, that he forgot to procure a sam ple of the water, but after his return to his quarters lie sent a sergeant of Sie Medical Corps to obtain it for him. This sergeant was provided with a pair of regulation bottles which he was ordered to fill from the stream running through the ground. The ser geant was weary with the journey, and calling at an inn, filled his bottles with )eer. Eventually, yielding to the at tractions which came In his way, he arrived no nearer to the ground than a convenient public-house, where he passed the night. Next morning he did not trouble to rinse out the dregs of the beer, but filled the bottles from i jug in the bedroom. This is why ihe analyst at Netley Hospital is puz '.ling over the water. - Some time ago a citizen of Glarus. n Switzerland, died shortly, b...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Music on the Brain. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

'• -■ Music on the Brain. That we are all victims to heredity Is an indisputable fact, and we have it on the assurance of the best scien tists and doctors of the uay that with out doubt we inherit the good points or defects, as the case may be, of our ancestors and parents. But claims to heredity can be carried too far. For instance, Mrs. Barlow, the other day, waxed eloquent over her daughter's skill at the piano when a friend was good-natured enough to say the givi played nicely. "Yes," said the proud mollier; "she has a beautiful touch, and she loves the piano so much that if I were to per mlt it, she would play the live-long day." "Indeed!" gasped her friend, breathing a sigh of relief that she did not live in the neighborhood. "Oh, it's a clear case of heredity,'1 wont on Mrs. Barlow. "It's quite na tural when you come to think of it Her dear grandfather had ills skull fractured by a cornet at a picnic!" "Annie," called Mrs. Hirem from the f'.-u" at the stairs, "how about breal...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

Important Announcement 11. 0. Jenkieson, TAILOR, His removed into the new Brick Shop opposite the lire station, where old and new customers will receive every attention. t£vT' Just received a large and varied assortment in all the latest Simples for Suits. Drop in and have a look at them. A GOOD FIT GUARANTEED. MISS MONICA GANNON (Certificates from Trinity College, L nidoijj, Teacher of Piaunforto Theory and Harmony, GUYS HOAD, KO U !BURR\ Wwila' (jmit l'ojipeniiuiLc'ulv, JtVr CuufUii uiul C'uUli, utvur .wil?-, 1/0. Bulloch Lade WHISKY.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SOME CURIOUS FINDS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

SOME CURIOUS FINDS. Nature accommodates herself to tlie most extraordinary conditions of life A lady lost a gold ring. Sonic three years afterwards the loser's cat caught a rat, Xrora which pussy had eaten the head. The nock of the rat was ex posed,"and the owner of the cat sa-» something metallic glittering on the rat's neck. On examination, this proved to bo the lost wedding-ring, em bedded in the llesh. The ring must have been carried by the old rat to its nest, and one of its very young ones must have thrust its head into it. As the animal grew larger each day, its novel and valuable collar became a fixture. The wonder is how nature continued to permit her living de mands to be supplied through such a small circumfcrence; yet the creature lived, was fat, and looked healthy. Cats in their hunting expeditions sometimes meet with an untoward fate. As some workmen were felllna timber, they discovered in the centre of one of the trees a cavity in whicn were the remains of a cat. The ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORLD. WHAT AM I REALLY LIKE. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

WOMAN'S WORLD. WHAT AM I REALLY LIKE. It is a strange but undeniable fact that most people hardly o\er hear their own voices. You may think that this sounds absurd, for you will sup pose that you can't help hearing your self when you are constantly speak ing. But you will realise tha: it is true if you remember what a shock it is to you, when you happen to be speaking in a roomful of talking peo ple, and they all suddenly stop talk ing, leaving your voice going 011 alone. A thing of this kind gives you a grea". .start, because the voice sounds so strange and unfamiliar. It is also a very great surprise to hear yourself mimicked. You are al most certain to exclaim, "Who is that meant for?" and oilier people who are present will laugh and say, "Why, it is exactly like you—don't you re cognise it?" and then you realise how deaf to your own voici you have been for many yours You never see your own face ei ther, except in a photograph ,and that is why a photograph is always some thing of...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOVE AND BUSINESS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

LOVE AND BUSINESS. The intermingling of love and bus! netis seems to be incongruous on the face of it, but it is inevitable with most people. J Try to imagine what it would be like if a man were not imbued wjtl' the desire to get on in the world in order that his wife might share it '.he pleasure of success! •And in the contrary event, wliei failure depresses him, is not this the opportunity of the wife to soothe him and help him to rise again? iThat is one of the paradoxes which face us in discussing the wide subjeel Df love. After all, this intermingling of business with the tender •passion may be for our own good, although fervent lovers will find it difficult to believe it. ' ■Love is usually too impulsive, anil i curb is,usefui. We p_rize more high 'y; the tiling - for which we have to work, the thing which' requires to be earned, and the prosaic curb of busi ness is not without Us advantages.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
To the Gouty. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

To the Gouty_. . For those "who are liable to attacks of gout, it is an excellent rule;to re duce the allowance of butcher's meat, especially, beef, talcing, it no oftener than once.a day", and preferably at midday instead of in the evening. Di gestion goes on very, slowly, if at all, during the hours of sleep, and the habit of eating meat at late dinner or supper is one of the chief causes tend ing to gout and "rheumatism of the gouty type. Industry is, essential to happiness and idleness is the friend of unhappi ness and ennui. Certain persons al ways will and always have existed who find employm.nt distasteful. They are endowed with an' indolent disposition, and enjoy nothing more than complete1 immunity from work and responsibility. Their intense dis like of work of all descriptions en ables them to be ever ready with what tliey are pleased to consider an adequate excuse. They "did not know,"" they "thought it had ibeen done," they "believed it was to be done tomorrow," it was' ...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
YOUR CHILD'S THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

: YOUR CHILD'S THOUGHTS. •Mothers, teach! your children t. think for themselves, and when the. come to you with their theories anc their beliefs, agree with the good tha is in them. If there is anything tha seems to t011 wrong explain it away if you can reasonably; if not, let i alone till you can do so. Children can no more think exactl} as their parents do, and still preserve their individuality, than they can re semble them physically in every dc tail, and forcing is as impossible in th< one case as In the other. No matter how lovingly united o\ how sweet their accord, husband am wife rarely have the same tempen raents, tendencies, or tastes. Their needs are different;- their mai aer of looking at things is not identi jal, and in varying ways their individu . Okies assert themselves. ■ Compromise makes matrimony no inly union,-but unison and unity. The spirit of compromise does no . •nean continuous self-surrender; i •Ices not mean' ceasing to he. a voi>"&lt...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Egg Jelly for Invalids. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

Egg Jelly for Invalids. Half an ounce of gelatine, three quarters of a pint of water, one ounce of sugar, rind and juice of half a lemon, one fresh egg. Soak the gela tine in cold water for some time be fore you malce the jelly. When-soft ened, dissolve in a pan with the sugar afod lemon rind. Melt it down gradu ally and boil for a minute; have the egg beaten up. Let the gelatine cool; add lemon, juice. Pour over whisked egg- jjnd mix all together for some time.

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORL[?] BUT MEN WON'T BELIEVE IT. [Newspaper Article] — Great Southern Advocate — 4 June 1914

WOMAN'S WORU i BUT MEN WONT BELIEVE IT. No true woman values the attention! if the man she cares for, for their ira terlal worth. That his gifts cost twelve pence o." twelve pounds makes much less difference to her than mankind eeneral!j\ vipposes. The thlfng is that he thinks of hor— »r tliaL lie does not think of her; that his love prompts him to spend gencr juslv—or uiui it is of a sparse, cal culating nature. The books, magazines, the occasion il ltowers that she loves, the concert »r play planned to give her pleasure— ill these are priceless to her, if given ay the right man; because they are evidences not so much of money spent, but of a thoughtful consideration for ^ier. And this is meat and drink to a wo nan's soul. It is not that she is vain ind thirsts for admiration. It is a leep, secret longing to he appreciated y the one being of all others from •vhom she desires appreciation. It is the average lot of woman to tee these attentions gradually,. fade nvay, when affection b...

Publication Title: Great Southern Advocate
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x