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Title: Cobram Courier Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 20,149 items from Cobram Courier, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ON DRAWING FLOWERS WITH PEN AND INK. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

ON DRAWING FLOWERS WITH PEN AND INK. Jf lb bo truo ns ;he pretty concolt snys, tho flowers only flourish rightly, In the gardens of those who lovo them it Is surely none tho less true that to draw plant form* well wo must hnve a true appreciation of.their beauty ami poetic meaning. As a writer on this subject well says : "We can have no thing more beautiful to draw than a flower, unless it bo a beautiful face. Flowers, leaves and indeed all plant forms give us tho most pcrfect models we can desire, and by their infinite va riety and aspccts de mand from us keen observation if wo would succeed in in terpreting the*n aright. 3f we lovo flowers we shall de light in drawing Ihom, and an wo draw (bom wc cannot fail to under stand and know them better than wc have over dime before." .Again, (lowers have recommendations to I study which other objects do not possess. To namo three only : An inexhnustiblo fund of subjects, and j these easily attainable ; the ability j to practice tliroughout...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NEW BATTLESHIPS. THE DREADNOUGHT OUT-CLASSED. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

NEW BATTLESHIPS. TUK PIIAI >N O IK! I rr OUT fl.AKHEII. The wnrship Queen ™*nhc;;h- ^ „ l„,inched rccmitlj at J oris 11,1 Dockyard. Is dlllicult to S.) she has' the offensive V defensive qualities of ft ship of | in'' i« association- with a ,1 which justifies l'fl- classtfiin H battle-cruiser. Indeed, 1,10 I,,r.l oi U.o Admiralty. in re , m tier in his programme ,P""-h in the House ot Commons, iu T"",,,,! that tlie four vessels of tho ! which me ''Cing ",liU " !U separate squadi'iin til greot. ?l „ii speed. ami from tills it ■° mimed that, lit tlie Admiralty s 'Vme <i( sin,U-g.v and tactics, they u. constituted a Imttlc-crui** "'•rhrv'are the most powerful ships • -li luivo rouchctl the launching mill although they are out "size, and possibly also in "hiing strength. Ii.v ships projected V som'' Iilher rowers notnbly by '? I'nileil Slates anil France, it re ins to li« seen whether the tie S now uiitler consideration in countries will materialise | ,h.rh, Kli/.abeth wil...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SECRETS' WEIRD EXITS. SOME CURIOUS INCIDENTS, WITH A WARNING TO THOSE WHOSE TONGUES RUN FREE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

SECRETS' WEIRD EXITS. s()M15* CUmOUS ' INCIDENTS, WITH A WARNING TO THOSE WHOSE TONGUES RUN ITUEE. "Men are ns bad us women (or gossiping in public places," said the head of a Billitor Street firm the other cia.V» lie was sore, and justly so, for, ouing to cnreless gossip, he had just lost a large sum of money. Two members of the firm, while lunching at a City restaurant, had discussed between themselves tho de tails of a big transaction In which the firm wns engaged, and a third man at tho next table had ovor heard what they were saying. Act ing promptly on the information, hr luid bought the shares, and net U-d all the profit. A certain magnate with large in 1(,rests in South Africa, had a visit nuni his hrot hcr-in-law, who talked impliedly of a new gold discovery, ••pon't talk so loudly," cautioned (ho cither, for he kneu' that his ty pist was in the next room. , Idit the mischief was done. The] typist had overheard the name of | the place where the new find had I Im-n made, and...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GLASS DRESSES. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

GLASS DRESSES. _ Jt has remained for the twentieth ccntury to show the advantages of garments made of minerals. Incrc diblc as it may seem, stone, iron, and even glass arc now being m.-mu factirrcd into clothes. The latest no velty in women's dresses is represent ed by robes of spun glass. The ventor is an Australia^ and the goods arc as bright and flexible as silk. The iiussiajiH are manufacturing it fabric from fibre of a filamentous stone from the Siberian mines, which is said to be of so durable a nature that it is practically indestructible. The material is soft to the touch and pliable in the extreme, and when soiled has only to be placed in a 'ire to be made absolutely clean. iron cloth is largely u»ed to-da}' by tailors everywhere for the purpose of making the collars of coats set properly. This cloth is mauufacturcd from steel wool, and has the appeal'* ancu of having been woven fnun horsehair.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Elderly "Jeames." SOME IS EXPERIENCES AND RECOLLECTIONS OF A RETIRED BUTLER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

An Elderly "Jeames." SOMU IS X P EJ11BN 013K AND HE COLLECTIONS OF A IIKT1R13D "UTLKIt. My first situation ns hutler in ** very wealthy household was with n hadielor peer, and the memory of th« first night T entered his ser vice nt his Itotulon house has al ways remained with mo, for he had ns K'iRsts to dinner the late Kir\cf. then Prince oC Wales, l*ord Uoths cliild, tl\o U\te nuke of Devonshire, some half-do/en well-known find distinguished people. I had served as undeiMmtlev in somi' itijr houses, Imt I had never hpfnrt; had complete charge of nf •:ui-k w hot) snrh important quests were pn*st>nl ; and at first 1 was 11 hit nervous K*:,t anything shoiiKl K<> wrong ; hut I )iad a perfectly ,ridiH'tl stall under me, and every wont oft without the slightest hitch. was the first occasion also Uwt 1 had attended. at a diijner n* ^liic)i It'iynlty was present, thon^ii 1 uftmi (||<| so afterwards. I "jdy stiiypil a year in my first ^liutUoii. M(V enip) ovor w...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A MUSICAL MOTOR-CAR. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

A MUSICAL MOTOR-CAIt. A novel method is being employed, to advertise the poods of the A. Jordan Cutlery -Company, of St. Louis and Sheffield. The firm's rcprr* sentative, Mr. Wostcott, ib travel line 20,000 mile* through the lTnito<l States with a motor-car, on one side of which" is an arrangement of ten. pipes called the Gabriel chimes, "which will play anything from Alex ander's Ragtime band to grand openi selections like 'Rigoletto.' There iH a keyboard within eas> reach of the chauffeur, who does the playing, the exhaust from the enginii furnishing the power. The clwuifleiir is Mr. Wentcott's son, and while his father is persuading the merchant to buy cutlery the young man is furnish ing a musical entertainment.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Worth Knowing. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

Worth Knowing. A rather surprising degree of in fluence. of the wine! upon plant growth and crops; has been shown by, the , experiments of JV. Oscar Bcrnheck; a German professor of agriculture. . Severe-gules tend to produce deformity, giving a .twisted . and knotty. sh«pc; to twii;« : and ordinary vNvinds "diminish the- energy of growth ^of-sprouts. through the increasu of transpiration and jilt'T ation. of circulatory; conditions, and have 'a drying';- effect that in some cases causes serious injury- to both soil and plants, r. Under a wind of •■Sttl per second,- thy ground loses ihrpe or four limes as*~much water as on protected land. On ground suffi ciently moist, strong sprouts are .but ,little - affected, but on soum ■•■soils the growth with no wind is three times as -great as with a wind of feet per second. I'ro lection is to be sought by various kinds, of wind-shields, such as walls and hedges, and especially by plnnl ing- forests on neighbouring hills.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"CEDARS OF LEBANON." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

"CEDARS. OF-LEBANON." According to a French traveller who has just returned from Syria, tbc celebrated "cedars of Lebanon," so often spoken of in the Old Testa merit, are disappearing at a rate that will soon make them a men Biblical legend. Mountain slopes formerly covered with them are now completely de nuded, with the exception of those of the Jebel-el-Arz, where about four hundred trees arc still standing. I" this croup there arc some fine speci mens of cedars, the oldest having a height of S9ft., whilst the largest :it the base of the trunk has a circum ference of -IDft. . It is estimated that these venerable trees arc over a thou sand years old. As a protection, a high wall has now been erectcil around this grove by the local au thorities.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SILVER TEAPOT IN A RIVER. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

STLVlilt TEArOT IN A JUVK1I. Seeing a .shining article sticking »/> in tho sand /row the bottom of u stronm, a little girl of Abington, l'onns.vlvjinia, pulled it from its hi«l* j"g.*J>Jacc and found it to a sil ver teapot. This-discovery enabled the police to recover most of the plunder which, together with the teapot, had been taken from tho Ahiagton home of Walter K. Hcr ing, a Philadelphia)!. The little girl, in company with n friend, while walking along a road had » very severe headache. She went to a rivulet running beneath a bridge to wet a handkerchief 11> apply to her head, when she noticed thr shin ing article. A squad of polio-nu'M were sent to the place, and in a short rAdius dug up most of the stolen articles. Anyone can take opportunities— you've got - to make them.—Winifred Hoggs. A friend once wrote Mark Twain n letter, saving that he was in very hail health and concluding "Is there anything worse than hav ing toothache at)'] e/irarhr ,'1P name time?*'. Twai...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"NUTS IS NUTS." [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

"NUTS IS NUTS." A Mr. Donaldson, who owned a sugar refinery in Queensland, went to England one year and bought some machinery for bis business. He took the machine to pieces and sent it home in parts, intending to put them together on the spot. A Custom House official gave him a lot of trouble on his arrival, ex amining every part and arguing; over the amount to be paid. At Jn.«t tlipy came to an agreement about all but one box, which contained the metal nuts used in bolting the parts of the machinery together. What was to he charged for these the official had no doubt at all. "Now as to these," he said, "the duty will be twopence a pound." Mr. Donaldson protested that this was too high. "NTot a bit of it," was the con fident reply ; "the schedule says dis tinctly that 4all nuts except cocoa nuts' are to pay twopence a pound. These aren't cocoa-nuts, so twopence a pound you'll have to pay !" "A good cook is offered a magnifi cent view from kitchen window of main thoroughfare, with c...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BANK FOR WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

BANK FOR WOMRN". An interesting experiment in beinir made in Berlin by n number o[ ad vanced women in establishing a small banking concern, to be known as tlie • Women's Bank. It is an enlargement of a somewhat similar concern which has existed there for many years, and has (or its object the remlcrine of advice and assistance to wo-ncn who wish to engage in financial transactions, such ns buying an 1 sell ing Bhnrcs and other property. A legal department has been opened ns well, in which women will he nilviscd by women on business matters. The concern has about 1.500 mem bers, nnd a working capital of about £50,000. Extensive premises, contain ing about fifty rooms, and hotisini: some sixty clerks, have been opened. Not all of them, however, are wo men. Men are still in charge of af fairs connected with the Kxclmnpp. Its. promoters claim that it is the first undertaking of its kind in tho world.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Ladies' Column. SOME GOOD RECIPES. MARMALADE—TO MAKE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

Ladies' Column. ♦ SOME GOOD RECIPES. mahmalal>1£-t0 make. The sight of Seville oranges in the fruit shops reminds us that the timo lor making marmalade has come. Marmalade is one of the most wholesome preserves we have ; not only is it palatable, but it is advised by physicians as a desir able adjunct to the breakfast table, where it should, in fact, always be found. There are many recipes for making marmalade : some people like "chip" marmalade ; others pre fer the jellied variety. Frankly, the former preserve, if properly made, is distinctly the best of the two, hut occasionally the "chips," ns the peel is termed, unpleasantly justify the name bestowed on it,: the rimt' of the orange, not being sutliciently ; boiled, is tough, and defies the teeth. Ilere follow two or more recipes 1 for mnrmahide, yo they will give scope for choice. Hecipe No. 1,—Wush and carefully •vipe the Seville oranges to re move all dirt, but do not soak them. Halve the fruit and cut it into very thin sli...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BURGLARS' FIREWORKS [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

BURGLARS' PIREWORKa A French chemist has invented on ingenious and somewhat humorous burglar alarm. He has submitted it to tho laboratory ol La Nature, where it did all that was claimed ol it by its inventor. It consists ot powdered iodine and ammonia. Tho iodine is lirst dusted over the floor, very little being ne cessary. A sufficient quantity o( the ammonia to moisten the powder !:i then sprinkled over it. This evaporates very rapidly, leav ing a- new substance—iodine nitrate— which will explode or detonate nt the slightest touch. Even n rat run ning across the floor will set tip a series ot tiny explosions. The unsuspecting burglar, though lie tread ns lightly as he can in the softest of felt slippers, will think he iB walking over bunches of Chinese crackers, and will arouse the entire household.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Tough Situation. A GAMBLER'S STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

A Tough Situation. A GAMBLER'S STORY. "The toughest situation J was ever in," said a young man who Hvos by *his wits, "was when I went into a Sixth-avenue gambling-den in Xew York, and begun to play roulette on o bind. It was the most desperate moment of my life. I hadn't a cent, in my pocket, and I hod to have one hundred dollars at once, or else— well. 1 had to have that hundred. T turned into the Sixth-avenue place, and went up th'* three narrow flights oi' stairs to the room where the tables were. There were o few hurd-looking men playing at the wheel, one or two were sitting in ; fit the faro game, and a poker party was at work in one corner. "As T glanced round, I noticed, sit ting all Mono in a chair tipped ngninst the wall, an old white haired innn with 1 ind blue eyes. He loo1 ed at me quizzically through the hmoke of his cigar. "I saw that the man keeping: the roulette-wheel was hist about flip ping the marble. I stopped up quickly to the table, and ps the marble went spin...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRATHCONA'S RAOMANTIC MARRIAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

KTlt ATI ICON A'S HOMANTK! MAHHIAGE. The marriage of Lord Strnthcona was a romance* He met the lady I when he was twenty-nine, and living , on the coast of Labrador. Slie was a widow, and had a little son. There was no priest or church within 1-.D00 miles, and the marriage was a simple contract without ceremony. j It was for this reason that when , the High (Commissioner became a ; peer in 1SU7 a rc-marriagc was held to be necessary, and it was solem nised with the full ritual of the ; Church of England. The Labrador marriage, however, was ratified by special Act of Parliament. i A journalistic curiosity is the 'In- j dependent/ of St. Petersburg (Flo rida), "the Sunshine City.1' To show its belief in the town's title, the 'In- t dependent' oflcrs to give away its ■ entire issue on any day on which the snn does not shine upon its olllce be fore three in the afternoon. Its faith huK been justified by tb»-. fact that it , has only been called upon to fulfil j its offer nineteen times ...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARMALADE (ANOTHER WAY.) [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

MARMALADE (ANOTHER WAV.I Ingredients : Twelve Seville oran ges, nine sweet oranges, two lemons, and the weight c( the fruit in pre serving sugar. Method : "Divide the rind of the oranges into quarters ; remove the fruit carefully and put it in a pre serving-pan with fts much cold water as will cover it. Boil un til the peel is quite soft. Pivid^ the fruit into sections, scrape out the pulp, and put the pips and fib rous skin into a basin, co\er with culd water, and leave them to soak until required. When the rinds are quite tender, drain them carefully, and cut them into very thin strips. Strain two pints of the liquid in which they were boiled, and add it to the water in which the pips and skins were soaked. rut the sugar and water into a preserving pan, boi! to a syrup, then put in (he shredded peel and the pulp, and boil gently until the marmalade jellies when tested on a cold plate. It is then ready to be poured into pots. The average cost of home-made marmalade is often less th...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PRISON BATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

PRISON BATTLE. 1 An extraordinary shooting aflray, I attended by the loss of seven lives, j occurred in the prison at M'AUister, Oklahoma, some time ago, when three convicts who had succecded in ob taining possession of revolvers at tempted to escape from the peniten tiary. At the conclusion of the day's work the men, by a ruse, gbt close to one of the jailers, whom they felled. Seizing his" keys, they started to run'towards the prison gates, firing upon all who attempted ! I to intercept them, and killing four. j Other convicts shouted encourage- ! merit to the mutineers, who had now j seized the girl operator at the prison ! telephone, and were holding her in j front of them to prevent the guards from f.ring. The guards fired only one . shot within the prison walls, and j this, unfortunately, wounded the girl. The fugitives, however, did not drop her until they reached the gates. Unlocking these, they jumped into a huggv standing outside, whipped up the horse, and dashed awgy. The...

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARMALADE PUPPING. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

MARMALADE TUPPING. Before quitting the topic in which marmalade figures conspicuously, I give a recipe for marmalade pud ding. This pudding is to be baked. The ingredients are :—A large table spoonful of marmalade, a dessert spoonful oi flour, a dessertspoonful of breadcrumbs, two eggs, one and a half ounces of butter, the same weight of sugar, and some short crust. Method : Cream the butter -And sugar together, add the egg.*-, and heat well. Stir the marmalade, flour, and breadcrumbs, lightly in, and pour the mixture into a pie dish, the edge of which must be lined with paste. Bake the pudding in a moderate oven from forty to forty-five minutes.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MOVING PICTURES REVEAL LIVING-CELL FORMATION. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

MOVING PICTURES REVEAL, LIV ING-CELL FORMATION. The Society of Biology in Paris re cently watched a moving-picturc film in which the formation of living cells was shown. Tadpoles which had been subjected to a fast for several weeks i were fed, and drops of their blood j placed under the cinematograph. The1 pictures plainly showed the blood corpuscles forming and then dividing, revealing the phenomena of the growth of animal' matter.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MARMALADE SAUCE. [Newspaper Article] — Cobram Courier — 14 May 1914

MARMALADE SAUCE. This is a very nice accompaniment to plain puddings, .such as boiled swot, arrowroot, etc. Required * Half a pint of water, one glass of sherry wine, two table&poonfuls c.f marmalade,, sugar to taste, mid a teaapoonful of lemon juice. Put water and marmalade into n saucepan ; stir until it boils ; add sugar, lemon-juice, and sherry ; stir | again until the sugar is dissolved, and serve. A more economical sauce can be made as follows, with half a pint of water, a tablespoonful m" lemon juice. Boil the water. Mix the cornflour smoothly with a little cold water, add it to the boiling water stirring all ihe time. Put it: tho sugar and marmalade, and simmer for five minutes ; add the lemon juice and serve.

Publication Title: Cobram Courier
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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