ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: World's News, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
248,232 results
THE NEW AUSTRALIAN TARIFF AND INDIAN TEA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE NEW AUSTRALIAN TARIFF   AND INDIAN TEA.   —♦— A committee of the Bengal Chamber of Com-   merce and the general committee of the Indian   Tea Association have drawn the attention of the   Government of India to the revised and partially   ad valorem duties on tea proposed under the   new Australian Federal tariff, describing them   as disadvantageous to British-grown as opposed   to China tea. A reply was received last month   intimating that the Secretary of State for India   and Lord Hopetoun had both been addressed by   cable on the subject, and a postponement of the   enforcement of the new duties had been request-   ed until the views of the Indian and Ceylon   planters could be fully represented.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ELECTRICITY IN LIEU OF STEAM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

ELECTRICITY IN LIEU OF STEAM. It is reported that electricity, in lieu of steam   for subsidiary purposes, is about to be utilised   more extensively in the English navy than here-   tofore. A series of prolonged experiments are   to be made to ascertain the range of the prac-   ticabillty of using this power for this purpose.   At present the capstan, steering engines, ven-   tilating fans, and derrick hoists on the vessels are manipulated by steam, necessitating the con-   struction of a bewildering network of pipes in the   interior of the ship. The new armored cruiser   Hogue is being fitted with electric wires, and the     entire subsidiary gear will be controlled by elec- tricity. Should the experiment prove successful,   the system will be extended to all other vessels   refitting, as well as thes...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NOVEL STYLE OF CRITICISM. Wishing to get an expert opinion on "A Stable Mystery," by Nat Gould (Everett), we sent it to a keen lover of bones and hunting, and be says:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A NOVEL STYLE OF CRITICISM.   Wishing to get an expert opinion on "A Stable   Mystery," by Nat Gould (Everett), we sent it to   a keen lover of bones and hunting, and he says:—   "It may suit a man of this kind: "but not this kind: "It is bad enough when a man doses a horse, but when he is made to poison his best friend, poison his valet, poison his detective, and wind up by poisoning himself, no wonder the turf gets such a bad name." Our hunting friend had no idea that we should reproduce his rough sketches, but it cannot be   denied they are very effective, and suggest a new style of criticism. For instance, the reviewer- artist, instead of having to write long descrip- tions of the books, will simply have to say: "These novels are certain to find favor with a lady of this type," giving a sketch; or, "Philoso- phers like our friend here depicted will find the following works very satisfactory," and so on.— "Publisher...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTABLE PLACES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

NOTABLE PLACES. Brief descriptions, properly authenti- cated, of notable places throughout Aus- tralasia, with accompanying rough sketches or photographs, will be accepted by the Editor of "The World's News" and paid for at current rates.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS. As advertisements are restricted to a few columns only in "The World's News," advertisers should make early application for space to prevent disappointment.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The World's News. A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A RECORD OF NOTABLE EVENTS, Issued from the office of "The Daily Tele- graph," Sydney, and available every Saturday morning at all newsagents throughout the Commonwealth — One Penny per copy. Communications intended for publica- tion should be addressed to the Editor. Business communications should be ad- dressed to the Manager of "The World's News," 147 King-street, Sydney.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FUTURE MAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE FUTURE MAN. Future man, according to scientists, and the same according to Sandow.—     "Sandow's Maga- zine."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
In the Public Gaze. SAD STORY OF BLIGHTED HOPES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

In the Public Gaze. —♦— SAD STORY OF BLIGHTED HOPES.   By the death of Lord Sefton, who passed away last week as the result of an accident that befell him over seven years ago while riding in a steeplechase at Aintree, one of the largest and most valuable estates in England (the Liverpool property alone is worth £150,000 a year, they say) passes to a new owner, and the most dis- tressing of recent tragedies among the nobly born has been brought to a bitter consummation. Early in the spring of 1894 (says "Free Lance") young Lord Molyneux, as he was known while still his father's heir, fell in love with Lady Mary Willoughby, the lovely young daughter of Lord and Lady Ancaster. He was 25, and she was 17, and still in the schoolroom. The parents on both sides approved, and the young people became formally engaged. A few weeks later the gallant young lover was riding in the Altcar Steeplechase, and at the fourth fence his horse fell, throwing him heavily on his bead. He did ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WEEK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE WEEK. There is no doubt some logic in the deci- sion of the Workers' Conference to formu- late "rules to deal with any member voting against a selected labor candidate, this be- ing declared to be a violation of the policy of the union." No doubt. But there is not something else violated by this decision which, at any rate, a few years ago was regarded as a hundred times more important than the policy of any union. Has the secrecy of the ballot wholly ceased to be an article in the labor creed? A generation ago it was held that there could be no show for the triumph of democratic principles unless the elector was se- cured by the secrecy of the ballot against dicta- tion and intimidation in giving his vote. Clearly, if the new rules of the Workers' Conference providing for   "dealing with any member" presum-   ing to vote as he may please and not as he is directed are to be effective, there must be some way provided of ascertaining how the member actual...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND THE CLERGYMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

MR. CHAMBERLAIN AND THE CLERGYMAN. "I suppose," says a clerical correspondent of "M.A.P.," "that almost anything about so par- ticularly prominent a personage as Mr. Cham- berlain possesses some interest. Years ago, in the early eighties, when the Colonial Secretary was President of the Board of Trade under Mr. Gladstone, and Mr. Forster was Irish Secretary, I had occasion to call at the House of Commons to see the member for West Birmingham. Mr. Chamberlain was most courteous, and begged me to dine with him in the House. I hesitated because of another half-engagment, but was pressed to stay, the Cabinet Minister adding, with a twinkle in his eye: 'Pray do, it will so much increase my respectability in the eyes of my colleagues if I am seen dining with a par- son; I know so very few clergymen!' Assent- ing, I was conducted through the lobby by my gracious host, when, just on entering the dining- room I was loudly accosted by Mr. Biggar, who touched me on the arm, saying: 'Pardon me,...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CURIOUS TREE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A CURIOUS TREE. One of the curiosities of Chatsworth, where   the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire are spend- ing Christmas, is a large artificial tree made of copper, but so dexterously constructed that it looks like a real weeping-willow. It is really a shower-bath. The branches and twigs are pierced with innumerable holes, and by turning a secret tap, water can be made to spray out from all these orifices. The story goes that, on one occasion, when the late Duke of Coburg was staying at   Chatsworth, he paid some attention to a certain lady. This (says the "Candid Friend") excited the jealousy of a youngish man who was also staying in the house. The latter one day saw the Duke and the lady walking towards the willow, and knew that his hour of vengeance had come. He stole gently after them, and when they had en- tered the shade of the tree he turned the tap, and the couple were completely drenched before they could escape.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHAT LORD BOSEBERY BEADS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

WHAT LORD ROSEBERY READS. Lord Rosebery is a student of the newspaper. An observant correspondent was noting him at the Swansea bookstall lately, during his 10 minutes' wait for his train. He gathered up the "Illustrated London News" with several sporting and dramatic papers, and seemed amused with a full-page picture of himself at Chesterfield. Then he asked for a "Christian World," which was produced. Finally he wanted a book. Mr. Jacobs was offered and rejected, and so was Mr. Kipling's "Kim"—as read.   "Martin Chuzzlewit" was returned to the shelf, doubtless for the same reason, likewise "Don Quixote" and the ''Swiss Family Robinson." It was Dr. Conan Doyle's "Study in Scarlet" that Lord Rosebery at last took—as not read. With the sporting and dramatic papers (the observant man remarks), the "Christian World," and Conan Doyle, Lord Rosebery should manage to strike the note to which the average man responds.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE KING'S JEWELS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE KING'S JEWELS. The King has caused some surprise by ex- pressing a wish that in lieu of rare gems semi- precious stones, such as the topaz, chrysoprase, jacinth, beryl, amethyst, and jasper, should be worn at Coronation functions. It seems that his Majesty has expressly men- tioned peridot, a new stone, for which we are indebted to Lord Kitchener. The stone is found near Wady Haifa, on the Nile, and when Lord Kitchener first saw it he recognised that it might become a source of revenue to Egypt, and recommended it to Lord Cromer, who has already granted a concession to a syndicate to work the mines. Peridot is quite an aesthetic "greenery-yal- lery, Grosvenor gallery" kind of stone; very pretty when cut, and will probably be quite the fashion next year.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PIO NONO AND THE CHILD DUKE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

PIO NONO AND THE CHILD DUKE.     When the Duke of Norfolk succeeded to his title (being only 12 rears of age), says the "Free Lance," he went on a visit to Rome. The then Pope, Pius the Ninth, took a desperate fancy to the little nobleman, the lay representa- tive of all loyal Catholicism in England. They became friendly, and the Pope so far waived all precedent as to take the little Duke on his back, "pick-a-back" fashion and trot him round his room. "Now," said the Pope, "what would you like best?" Earnestly the little boy answered, "Oh, show me your bedroom, Holy Father; they say no one may go in there." And they tell the story that the Pope carried the Duke into that inaccessible apartment on his shoulders, took from the wall the great crucifix hanging over   the bed, and gave it to his little guest as an   eternal keepsake of a happy hour. That crucifix   is now at Arundel Castle.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ODDEST OF AMERICAN CLUBS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

ODDEST OF AMERICAN CLUBS.     Oddest of American clubs is that named "The Children of the Ark." It is an organisation of Philadelphia, every member of which claims Noah as his illustrious ancestor. The first dinner of "The Children of the Ark" took place last spring. Fifty-eight men sat down in a miniature ark to toast the hero of the deluge and to pledge his memory. "The Children of the Ark" will journey to Paris for their next dinner—journey in the spirit, and not in the flesh. And the dinner, after this, will take place at Morocco—again in the spirit. For "The Children of the Ark" mean to thus see all the countries and dine in them.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ICE KING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE ICE KING.   Not even a multi-millionaire can hold the attention of America for any great length of time. Interest in Mr. J. Pierpont Morgan is already waning in New York and Boston in favor of that springing up about Mr. Charles W. Morse. Thia gentleman is familiarly known as the Ice King. He made his millions by monopolising the ice crop of the State of Maine for several years past, and while other American financiers have been occupied in consolidating the great railway systems of the country, he has been doing the same to several important banking institutions in New York and Boston. Mr. Morse's rise has taken place at the ex- pense of a number of Tammany politicians who had been favored with shares in the American Ice Company. In the dog days the ice company raised its prices, bringing wretchedness to thousands of poor. Revenge came at the recent municipal election, when all candidates having anything to do with "ice," notably the outgoing Mayor, Mr. Van Wyck, w...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PHIL MAY AND THE STAGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

PHIL MAY AND THE STAGE.     At a copyright performance of Lady Violet   Greville and Mr. Mark Ambient's play, "The   Moth and the Candle," at Wyndham's Theatre,   on December 18, Mr. Phil May returned   to his early love—the stage—and, with Mr.   Dudley Hardy, supported Lady Violet, in the   preliminary production of the piece. When Mr. May was 14 years of age, he ran away from an architect's office in Leeds, where he had been placed by his father, and joined a travelling show, for which he painted posters and pasted them up during the day, and at night acted various parts for the remuneration of 13s a week. Mr. May's mother was, as Miss M'Carthy, a well-known actress in her young days, and still retains much of the great beauty that made her a popular toast nearly 50 years ago.— "Free Lance."  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SAD COINCIDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

SAD COINCIDENCE.   Many of my readers (says the "Free Lance") recollect the tragic death of Madame Patey, who expired on the platform a few years ago just as she had finished "The Banks of Allan Water," which terminates with the line "There a corse lay she." After the death of the cele- brated contralto, the first artiste to sing the song in public again was Miss Ada Crossley, who gave it as an encore at Keighley the other day. She had just got to the second last line when a lady in the audience fainted; and after her moans and struggles had created something of a panic, Miss Crossley sat down on the platform, and left the song unfinished. On the same day Madame Patey's husband died at Bournemouth!

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TEACHER AND PUPIL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

TEACHER AND PUPIL. Far away in the Victorian mining centre, Bendigo, lives a simple music teacher, Allan Bindley, a man of modest claims and still more modest fortune, but who taught Miss Amy Castles all she knew of music before she left her native Australia. On the night of her recent debut in London, when her dressing- room was thronged with people of distinction, and masses of costly blossoms were lying at her feet, a cable containing just two words, "Good Luck," was handed to Miss Castles from Mr. Bindley. In that moment all her success was forgotten, the tears fell on the paper as she pressed it to her lips, and, remembering that cables from Australia are costly items, she said to a friend: "How good of him, for he is not a rich man."   —"Free Lance."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NO TIME TO BE MARRIED. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

NO TIME TO BE MARRIED.   Miss Josephine Holman, the fiancee of Mr. Marconi, announces that the marriage has been postponed by mutual agreement on account of the necessity Mr. Marconi has to concentrate his thoughts on his work. He will get married when the success of his achievements permits some relaxation.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x