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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The In'dian Adv6catk. 85 embarrassed business, no startling warning, no wife's en treaty can stay his headlong career. A giant of unruled de sire is aroused within him. Beg him by all that is holy, speak to him of ruined home and poverty-stricken wife and outcast children, the passion of unholy gain laughs at your beseeching. Bind him with chains, fasten him round by every tie, the giant of awful craving snaps every bond asun der as if they were but a thread, and plunges its victim into perdition. Congrkrs is going to make an effort to oust anarchy. It is a deplorable fact, says the Southern Messenger, that within seven years six rulers have been assassinated by anarchists and that the murderer of our late President was highly ap plauded by numerous anarchists. Whence this threatening evil? It arises from the moral anarchy now prevalent. The Monitor says the truth about it: "There is another form of anarchy against which public opinion should also devise some different laws. The man...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

86 The Indian Advocate, -- - f At St. Peter's. r H By Dom. Vincent Montalibet, 0. S. B. Hut thou, of temples old or altars new, Standest alone with nothing like to thee. (), "(ViMe Harold. There is in Rome a spot' doubly consecrated by religion and art, adorned with all the historical associations of impe rial Rome and nascent Christianity: a spot synonymous with glorious achievements and monstrous cowardice; the tragical theater of Nero's exploits and Christian heroism, both circus and calvary: a spot chanted by pagan muse and Christian hymn; where the colossal fabric of Rome's power has been confronted and crushed by a fisherman. There, in the arena, amid the wild applause and tumultuous acclamations of a blood-thirsty populace, gladiators slew each other for Cesar's capricious pleasure; there the extravagant and beastly whims of Nero fed on human holocausts and the gay enjoyment of nocturnal promenades, with the living bodies of Christian martyrs, covered .with pitch and set on f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Thk Indian Auvocatk. 87 this wonder of wonders, lofty as the sky, expansive as nature, resplendent as light, harmonious as music. The richest mar bles, porphyry, jasper, melchite and oriental alabaster display therein their graceful, varied and shining beauty, whilst all around frescoes, statuary, paintings and mosaics bring into relief their charming, glittering effect. And when your eye wanders in delight from the gilded ceiling to the classic Corinthian columns, from the angels on the cornices to the majestic baldacchino and from the royal mausoleums of the Popes to the crowning glories of the dome; when all at once you meet the mighty figures of the Evangelists or the Proph ets evolving before you the God-sent message, thereby mak ing of this temple the meeting-point, the home of the Old and the New Testament: when you perceive in the tribune the colossal statues of the four doctors of the Church, Ambrose, Augustine, Athanasius and Chrysostom, supporting the wooden episcopal cha...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

88 Thk Indian Advocate. summation in glory and the soul, expanded to the very measure of the Infinite, exclaims in transport: Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts, The heavens and earth are full Of the majesty of Thy glory. Thee, the glorious choir of the Apostles; Thee, the admirable company of the Prophets; Thee, the white-robed army of Martyrs praise. Thee, the Holy Church throughout the world 1 Doth acknowledge The Father of Infinite Majesty. Grand old cathedrals! Martyrs were your precursors, catacombs your vestibule and angels your makers; but Peter's Ark has Prophets for messengers, Solomon's Temple for por co and God for artist! "When, having traversed the length of the nave without uttering a word, he passed from under the gilded roof, and the spacious dome, lofty as a firmament, expanded itself above him in the sky, covered with tracery of the celestial glories and brilliant with mosaic and stars of gold; when, opening on all sides to the wide transepts, the limitless pavem...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Thk Indian Advocatr. 89 While stands Peter, Rome shall stand; When falls Peter, Home shall fall; And when Rome falls, with it shall fall the world. Peter lives in his successors, and when the last of them falls, his last breath shall be the signal of the world's agony, just as the sun grew dark and night overtook day when the Son of the Living God expired on the Cross. And we have an appropriate symbol of Peter's indefectibility in this glo rious temple, sublime illustration of man's genius and devo tion. r But thou, of temples old or altars new, Standest alone with nothing like to thee; Worthiest of God, the holy and the true. v Since Zion's desolation, when that He Forsook His former city, what could be Of earthly structure in His honor piled Of a sublimer aspect? Majesty, Power, Glory. Strength and Beauty all are aisled In this eternal ark of worship undefiled. Byron, "Ctiihle farold." ,Romk,, January, 1902. A gau.ant old gentleman by the name of Page, who was something of a rhym...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

go The Indian Advocaik. r - . 4 :: A Sfeter of Charitq. : IIHIII Continual from the 'tbruary A'nmoe: v t No matter at what hour of the day she was called upon, she never complained; even her meals were taken in snatches. She used to say: "Storekeepers never complain when-called from their meals to serve a customer; should I grumble when called to aid in spreading the love and service of Jesus Christ?" In a single day she has been known to open the way for a re ligious vocation, the door of the novitiate or of the prepara tory seminary; next she recommended a young man for a posi tion, an old gentleman for a place in a hospital, a decrepit soldier for a pension, and all this without noise or flurry. Whatever work of charity presented itself, she was ready to lend a helping hand. "Let us accept all the good that presents itself," she would say to the sisters: "God will send us all the money we need, if we make good use of what He furnishes us." She never allowed the mere doing of good...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The Indian Advocate. 91 ' the address when you reach the street; you will do me a great favor for the party needs that package immediately, and call aain, when I shall be less busily engaged," and the fortunate applicant, upon reaching the street, found the package ad dressed to himself, and containing what he had asked for! Still, she was neither fickle nor feeble. When' it was time to be severe, she knew how to show her strength ok will. A young man, in whom she had been deeply interested, failed to correspond with her cares. After several promises broken, she called him and quietly but positively said: "Sir, an occu pation awaits you at Constantinople. Your passage is paid; here is your passport. Go and pack up your trunks. You leave to-night." In vain did hq .promise: she was inflexible, (and, sure enough, that evening the thoughtless young man was on his way to Constantinople. , She found meanst to employ all in some good, work, ,in some ministration of mercy. Rich 'ladies came...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

wawfH, ,nii, ...lpl 92 Thk Indian Advocate. mischief to themselves if not assisted. "In regard to those who so easily speak about committing suicide, I do not be lieve them:, ii they intended to do so, they would talk less about it." Her knowledge of human nature also made her very care ful not to say too much about piety, in giving alms, lest the desire to excite pity or sympathy should create a hypocritical spirit among the needy, and she never could encourage the giving of injudicious alms when persons were in debt them selves. "We must be just before being generous, and pay those to whom we owe before undertaking to give charity." When she had succeeded in bringing together a number of young men for an afternoon's charity, she was delighted. There were young doctors, lawyers, clerks and others at her service, and she would say to the sisters, "What a good day those of my people spent; it has been passed in the practice of charity." Even the poorest were made to feel the pleasure...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The Indian Advocate. 93 her a considerable sum for the sick. He kept his promise, and was afterwards induced to deposit in her keeping a large amount which he had intended to give to the partners of his previous crimes. This sum she sent to the family, in which the gentleman had already re-entered. After a little while she came to him, one would think with a tale of woe in which she was the chief sufferer. One of her friends in Faubourg St. Marceau had lost his horse, and with this his means of sub sistence. Exasperated, he broke out into blasphemies against God, and became the terror of his family. The mother has tened to Sister Rosalie, who hurried to her newly-acquired friend, obtained a better horse than had died, and went with the animal herself to the stable, where she enjoyed the sight of a reconciled and converted father, a rejoicing mother and children. Her devices to assist the poor knew no term. A gardener whose work was interrupted came to her in great distress. "Be here...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

94 The Indian Advocate. During the foreign occupancy a Russian soldier- was con demned to death, and the report of the intended execution reached Sister Rosalie's ears. She hastened off, in company with an old lady, and, having asked, was- immediately admit ted to the general headquarters, where she cast herself upon her knees and implored the life of the culprit. "You know and love him, then," said the officer. "Yes, I love him; I love him as one of my brothers purchased in the blood of Jesus Christ, and I am ready to give my life to save his." Her petition was granted, and she returned to her anx ious sisters, ignorant, she said, which to think most about, her success or her audacity. We have already remarked her positive way of refusing or rejecting certain requests or even charities. Where cer tain persons suggested that a ball or theatrical entertainment might be given to help her poor, whom she ldved so passion ately, she' promptly replied: "No, we must not force the devil to ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Thk Indian Advocate. 95 1 II LOCALS 8 ! St. Mary's Academy is well attended this year. It has fifty scholars enrolled. A 20x60 addition in brick, two stories high, will he built this year at Sacred Heart. It seems that spring is slow in coming. This part of the country has seen few fair days during February. We are anxiously listening for the whistle of that promised train' to Asher. Hope long deferred tryeth our patience. St. Benedict's Industrial School is going on smoothly in its own hum ble way. The boys are full of life and fond of sport. According to latest accounts, two more railroads will cross Potta watomie county. Will they be newspaper roads, as usual? It becomes rather hot for horse thieves in Pottawatomie county. Keep away, gentlemen, if you care to number among the living. The four inches of snow that fell on the 20th of February enabled farmers to plow, and now they are busy as bees, preparing for spring plant ing. On Feb. 14th. at Oklahoma City, Albert Tracy, one of ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Kp 96 The Indian Advocate. early date, and they were authorized to collect money from the interested members to defray expenses of the trip. The council then adjourned, to meet again at the call of the delegates. ST. BENEDICT'S INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, Castlebury, J. Bruno, J. Curley, A. O Keefe, W. Scott, W. Berry, S. Mulligan, J. Roll of Honor for January, 1902. JUNIORS. Hardin, J. Hardin, T. McEvers, C. SENIORS. Hillerman, B. Stucki, J. Brant, L. Shapwatuck, J. Roll of Honor for February, 1902. Hall, C. Zoeller, A. Kobler, F. Harvison, F Bruno, J. Zoeller, A. Ogee, C. Curley, A. O' Keefe, W. Mulligan, J. Berry. S. Harley, . Stucki, J. FUNIORS. Castlebury, J. DeC.raff, I. Slattery, J. Hardin, T. SENIORS. McDole, M. Shaefer, F. Noel, H. Simpson, J. Kobler, F. Joyce, W Seek, A. Castlebury, C. Shapwatuck, J. Brant, -L. Goodin, J.

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

r Vol. XIV. Vt w fr . u. The Indian Advocate APRIL, 1902. MANE NOBISCUM DOHINE. Remain with us, O Lord." Stay with us, Master. Never yet Had souls more need to pray. Sweep from our hearts each vain regret ; Fill them with Heaven's own calm, and let Thy light shine on, tho' others set. Stay with us, Master, stay! Stay with us, Master. Who but Thee Can cheer life's wintry day, Can scatter clouds, tho' dark they be, With light divine, we feel, not see? Weary, yet trusting, we turn to Thee. Stay with us, Master, stay! Stay with us, Master, when the hand Of death in dark array Strikes, and we go to the spirit-land, Thine own bright Home, so pure, so grand; There let us meet, a happy band, Master, with Thee to stay! Bring us, dear Master, safely there, To Thy loving Heart, we pray; Home from this exile dark with care To Thy Land of Love, so pure, so fair; In mercy gather us, each one there, Master, with Thee to stay! No. 4

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

98 The Indian Advocate. "I t it i aSa A a 1 Ib1i ) lftlllMIIC 4 &V t tjt ii me iiuiuii v-aumuo. jj t ,,,:: , , , In the beginning of the last century, when the Cherokee Indians still lived down in Georgia,one of them completed as extraordinary an invention as many which have given their originators deathless fame and ample fortune. One day members of his tribe took a white man prisoner, and found in his pocket a scrap of paper with printed words upon it. The prisoner explained its meaning to the wonder ing red men, who at once called it "the paper that speaks." There were some, however, who were sceptical, and refused to believe the white man, while others received the message on the paper as the work of the Great Spirit. One only among them, by name Sequoyah, comprehended the situation. "We forget things," he said, "because we have no way of making paper speak. We should have a way. I will find it." The captive explained that letters stood for sounds, groups of letters for word...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

Tin: Indian Advocate. 99 S would fix their thoughts, as flies are imprisoned in amber. Many of them took unaccustomed journeys for the express purpose of writing to their homes. Even old men nearing ft " i 1 HI the grave seemed to grow young again in this strange and fascinating study. Sequoyah's alphabet contained thirty-six lettets, each one

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

ioo The Indian Advocate. representing a sound and having the value of a syllable. The inventor, unlike many others, received honors and appre ciation during his lifetime, being proclaimed Philosopher and Prophet by the Great Council, and receiving a medal which he wore to the day of his death. One would have thought a single achievement of this sort enough for one individual; but, not content, he devised a scheme whereby all Indian tongues might be consolidated into one. To gain the knowledge of other languages which he would require for his new undertaking, he set forth on a long journey, and from this journey he never returned. He was received everywhere with homage and honor; but the fatigue of the trip conquered him, and -he died in New Mex ico, working to the last. He never became a Catholic, although the Bible was one of the first books that was given to his people by the help of his alphabet. He could never understand why those who believed in Christ should be at variance, an...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

The Indian Advocate. ioi f Human Sacrifices by XXXX 1 n XXX South American Indians. If U tx - i 11 Ninety-three miles from the city of Esmeraldas, scattered throughout the fertile mountains, forest and desert lands of the province, on the banks of the rivers Onzole, Gayapaard and San Nichole, live the unhappy and degraded Cayapas. Although they are divided into three tribes, each tribe having its own country, they prefer absolute solitude and isolation, and, scattered among the gloomy virgin forests, they only visit their respective countries a few times a year, to take part in the celebration of their barbarous feasts and to receive the visits of the Catholic missionary, who is the Vicar of these provinces, and for whom they have a special preference. I am unable to give an exact approximation of the number of individuals that form the three tribes, for the reason that the country is so inaccessible. The native Cayapo is able to travel enormous distances with ease, and fatigue seem...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

102 The Indian Advocate. Two facts that favor the work of conversion and civiliza tion are the short distance of their settlement from the capi tal of Ecuador and the comparatively small number of the Indians. The fact is that the natural conditions strongly urge -us to bring the torch of faith among these poor benighted savages. The fertility of the soil and the topography of the country are entirely in our favor, and our observation of the people have filled us with deep compassion for them. But what can a poor priest do, alone and without means? It is true that I do what I can, and sometimes achieve the impos sible at the risk of my life. The government regards the Indian with complete indifference, to counteract which I have begun an active propaganda. I have written to the "Bien Social," the only periodical published in this province, with the aim of calling the attention of the Ecuadorian press to the matter and thereby making it public. During my recent mission in August, Sep...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

Tun Indian Advocate. 103 M K The laws of the Cayapas condemn polygamy. The wo men of the Cayapas are clothed like the first woman in the garden of Eden. The men cover their shoulders and breasts with a simple garment, and gird their loins with palm leaves. The women are veritable slaves, beasts of burden, and are obliged to do all the household work. The male In dian is a man of leisure. His sole contribution to labor dur ing the year is the making of his canoe (a little vessel six or seven feet long and half as wide). He devotes all his time to traveling, the pleasures of the chase and fishing. Rev. An tonio Metalli. In the Senate recently Senator Turner oifcred a resolution treciting that the Indian schools of the country were being conducted loosely; that pupils who are afflicted with tubercu losis and other diseases are admitted, to the detriment of the health of inmates of the schools, resulting in an "appaling mortality;" that the intermixture of the sexes results in a lowerin...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 April 1902

104 The Indian Advocate. I 3 It The Benedictine Sisters, h .... ? ii Below we present to our readers a picture of the Convent "of the Benedictine Sisters. This building enjoys the distinc tion of being the only one of the principal houses of Sacred Heart Mission left standing after the disastrous fire which occurred here a little more than a year ago. This is only the more remarkable from the fact of its near proximity to the Abbey Church, it being only twenty-two yards distant from the latter building (which was entirely destroyed), and as it was constructed entirely of wood, its preservation may be deemed almost miraculous. It was, indeed, fortunate that it escaped destruction, as for a time it served as a kitchen and dining-room for the members of the community until such $

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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