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Elephind.com contains 2,658 items from Tomahawk, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 27 June 1918

V*' Tripping the Light Fantastic Is Called "Hugging Set to Music" By BILLY SUNDAY Dances are simply hugging set to music. Cards are the tools of the gamblersthe only thing more crooked is horseracing. Not all theater plays are im moral, but the few exceptions only prove the danger of most of them. If the dance is only a matter of exercise and grace and makes no appeal to the passions, try to have the men dance together, and the women dance together. It would kill the dance in two weeks. Card playing and dancing are greater enemies to the spiritual life of the church than the saloon. Not that they are worse than the saloon, but they damage the spiritual life of the church more. I do not condemn the theater as an institution. It has noble people in it, like Maude Adams, the late Joe Jefferson, David Garfield and others, but it is run for the purpose of amusement and not .for instruction. When it presents a story of a harlot, why that story isvtold tain the people in the audience, not ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 27 June 1918

{Copyright, 1918. by the McChire Newspa per Syndicate.) Whenever Hester Fey had ten cents left in her purse after she had bought her luncheon, paid her carfares and trought her evening paper out of the -45 certs she allowed herself for "spendiag money" every day, she went to a little basement flower shop and exchanged that silver piece for a rose or a couple of carnations, a few daf fodils or pansies, or any other bloom that that small sum would secure. "Don't you ever buy candy?" the girls in the office would say to her when she steadfastly refused to share with them a little bag of licorice 4lrops or chocolates that they brought back with them after luncheon. "Every girl has a sweet tooth it's funny you haven't." "Well, maybe I do like sweets," Hes ter would say. "But to me flowers are ^eo much sweeter than candy. And a Vose on your desk will stay sweet for days, and the candy is all gone in an afternoon." On her way from business she used to walk up the avenue past the big floris...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 27 June 1918

%iir Newsofthe State Condensed for Busy Folks those students who have work to make cholera are reported in forms north of this village, according to farmers France to enter field work for the national Y. M. C. A.^ in the battle ther of J. B. Johnson of this city, was ordained at the meeting of the Aug ustana synod in the Twin Cities last week. pi Willow River.Dale Hulburt had a gash seven or eight Inches long cut in his leg from the knee down while running Arthur Wood's sawmill, when I he came in contact with the saw. Bemidji. Religious education among the young was the keynote oX addresses by speakers at the sixtieth annual convention of the Minnesota Sunday school association, meeting her- *r S Kettle River.Mrs. B. J. Carlson of Kettle River has been appointed town Lutheran church In Eagle Lake for several years has left for Hudson, were brought from New York to Hib bing and will be placed in local homes.* The babies were obtained from Ca- tholicOrphanage and traveled with at tend...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 27 June 1918

1ocalt l\ 1 In. c. i is P^ guwr.-^g^' 4,: vi sv ::jBsgjg There Is more Catarrh In this section of the country than all other diseases put together, and until the last few years was supposed to be incurable. For a trea many years doctors pronounced it a disease and prescribed local reme dies, and by constantly failing to cure with local treatment, pronounced it incur able. Science has proven Catarrh to be a constitutional disease, and therefore re quires constitutional treatment. Halls catarrh Cure, manufactured by F. J. Cheney & Co.. Toledo. Ohio. Is the only Constitutional cure on the market. It is taken Internally. It acts directly on the blood and mucous surfaces of the system. They offer one hundred dollars for any case It fails to cure. Send for circulars and testimonials: Address: F. J. CHENEY A CO.. Toledo. O. Sold by Druggists. 75c. Take Hall's Family Pills for constipation. IN PROBATE COURT. Citation for Hearing on Petition Administration. for State of Minnesota, County...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

Vol. XVI. Just foe and Fair Deeding for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen, THE TOMAHAWK. Offi 1 O of the Minnesota 6USH.BEAUi.IEU,' Fouler. Edited bf THE TOMAHAWK PUB. CO, White Earth Agency, Minnesota. Entered at the Postofflce at White Earth, Minn., as mail matter of the second class. SUISCRIPTIOI: $1.50 PER TEAR III0UI CE etc- The keen appreciation of heart felt joys and thanksgiving which will fill the heart and soul of every loyal Belgian, French, Serb and other German oppressed nation that will prevail when the happy day will herald the banishment forever of the brutal dominance of Prussian militaryism wil' find a similar counterpart among 2 the burdened and oppressed Chippe was of Minnesota, especially the progressive and intelligent classes them who are forced, under present odious conditions, to pay double taxation, subject to rough neck courtesy at the hands of ser vile minions of the Indian bureau and their rights and privileges otherwise abused and ignore...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

I: :.f fe AWAIT FURTHER ENEMYEFFORTS Allied Forces On All Battle Fronts Prepared For Next Blow From Teutons. fOE STROKE EXPECTED Infantry Activity at Present Confined to Local Actions at Various Points Artillery Activity Normal and Aerial Fighting Increases. London, June 28.On the mountain fend Piave sectors of the Italian front as well as along the western battle, line, .the Allied armies await further nemy efforts. Infantry activity ia confined to local actions at various points. On the vital stretch fof the battle Jront between Ypres and Fflieims the most important action of the last few days has been that in which the American trpops took from the Ger mans a commanding hill position near iRelleau wood, northwest of Chateau Thierry. Besides gaining the hill, the Americans took 264 prisoners, includ ing seven Officers. From the hill the Americans dominate the /German po sitions for some distance beyond in the direction of Torcy. German Stroke Expected. It is believed the German co...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

mmmmmmmmmtmtuutiuiii The Emtrty House By Fanois Barnstt Linsky {Copyright. Utt. by the McClure Newspa per Syndicate.) The little brown car had swung with ft soft humming sound down the smooth road, and its sole occupant was sitting with her hands in her lap, looking .dreamily out at the landscape and the rows of houses that they passed. Many a one passing by on the sidewalk might have envied the lovely young woman who sat there, so slen-" der and aristocratic in the little brown car, but she herself was not even con scious of the looks, whether envious or admiring, that were cast in her direc tion. If, as the poets say, "the eyes are mirrors of the soul," then It was very apparent that Blaine Hargrave was not happy, for the sad, far-away ex pression on her face told Its own story. As the machine turned the corner of the street, however she began to take more interest in her surroundings, and she watched carefully the houses she passed. Suddenly she leaned forward and spoke to the ch...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

Baseball Equipment Aids in Making Athletes of Soldiers of the U. S. Now in France Three months ago an earnest appeal from a second lieutenant of an engi neer regiment doing duty at a perma nent post back of the lines in France, for athletic equipment to outfit five teams was mailed to Clark Griffith. Mr. Griffith responded to the call. Up to the present time the Griffith Bat and Ball fund has given the boys about 48,000 balls, 12,000 bats, 4,000 catcher's masks, 4,000 catcher's mitts, 4.000 chest protectors, 4,000 first base- Clark Griffith. man's mitts, 12,000 base bags, more than 60,000 fielder's gloves and thou sands upon thousands of baseball guides, score cards, sweaters, boxing gloves, shoes and countless other ar ticles. In all, It has furnished a great er part of the baseball goods that have been sent over there. N Clark Griffith's appeal to President Wilson and the secretaries of the war department and the navy, as well as other men of influence Is largely re sponsible for ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

i Universal Military Service Is the Great Preparedness Program By EDWARD W. PICKARD of the Vigilant* The great war, whatever may be its effect on the fate of dynasties and on national boundaries, is certain to be followed by a "leveling" process wider than the world has ever known. Already the movement is well under way in many of the countries of the old world, and its spread to the new world is inevitable. The in sistent will of the great mass of the people is,imposing itself on the governments of the nations. Where it is not expressed by their legislative representatives it will be given voice more directly. The ancient fiction that there are no "classes" in America has long been discarded, but before many years we will have approached 'much nearer to that ideal state of equality. The nations that are best prepared for the coming change will suffer the least disturbance from it. The United States now has under consideration a plan potent to prepare ituniversal military "training....

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

-H I A THE SHOT oris fr BootkTarki$oiv UIUNG the spring of 1917 certain groups of patriots in the East, particularly in New York and Boston, did a great deal of worrying about the Middle and West ern states. These Easterners would come together at luncheons and commit tee meetings, and after getting into a condition of collective depression about the apathy of the country, they would appoint one of their number to act as an' oratorical eommlsslon. "Rudiger, go out there," they would say Co him. "Rudiger, for God's sake, go out there and ,10086 the middle West!" And Rudiger would go oot on his rousing expedition and make speeches be fore commercial clubs, and at larger meetings, and then go back home without having noticed that the Middle and Western states were already passing their e,aotae for enlistments of fighting men, whereas Rudi gar's owu state, at that time, had filled just about a third of its own enlistment quota. However, the Rudigers were not all Easterners. About 100,00...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

T^4 TDried HE tenderness of Libby's Sliced Beef, will delight youbut you will find the greatest difference in the flavor! Have Libby's Sliced Beef with creamed sauce today. Seehow much more tender, more delicate it is than any other you have ever tried. Libby, M?NU1 Libby, Chicago in water for pelvic catarrh, ulceration and inflam mation. Raconuneodcd by Lydie E. Pmlduun Med. Co. for lea years. A hasting wander for nasal catarrh, sore throatand sore ayes. Economical SuafUfW. sSTTdnaaa. patpSTto V^ML TTPtofciaTcaaCanpny.Boaeo.Mw.Ji Canned Ostrich Eggs. Signs reading "Newly canned ostrich eggs for sale" may soon meet .the eyes of the housewife looking into the win dows of grocery stores in London, says the Popular Science Monthly. This statement is based on the fact that ostrich eggs are being packed experi mentally In South America for ship ment to England In liquid form. One ostrich egg is equal to about two dozen hen's eggs. If the canning of these eggs proves successful, it will m...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 4 July 1918

ATTENTION FISHERMEN! Sec. 4808, Game and Fish laws provide that "no person shall catch or kill more than twenty-five Crap pies or troat of any variety fifteen Bass of any kind except rock bass, in any one day, nor in any other manner than by angling for them With hook and line held in the hand or attached to a rod so held." etc. Sec. 4873, provides that "no black or oswego bass shall be taken which are less than 'nine inches in length and any person catching such fish shall at once return same to the water,' etc. No 'wall eyed Pike of less than fourteen inches in length or one pound, round or undressed weight,' if caught such fish shall be at once returned to the water. Sec. 4872, provides that 'any person violating the pro visions of this act shall oe guilty of misdeamor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine of not less than $10, not more than $50 and cost of prosecution, or by imprisonment in the county jail for not less than ten days or more than sixty days for...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

ml i Vol. XVI. THE TOMAHAWK. Official Organ of the Minnesota Chippewas. 6US H. BEAUUEU, Founder. Edited by THE TOMAHAWK PUB. CO, White Earth Agency, Minnesota. i '.X- 'v Justice and Fair Dealing for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. Eniered at the Postoffice at White Earth, Minn., as mail matter ot theCommittee econd class. SUBSCRIPTION: SI.SO PER YEAR IR ADVANCE Insistent officious meddling, brutal arrogance and indifference to the proper rights of Leech Lake Pillager Chippewa Indians was, practically, the primary causes which led to hostilities between the Government and the members of the bands mentioned and which precipitate^ the fatal battle of Sugar Point, only a few years ago, occasioning the tragic death of Major Wilkinson and seven mem bers of his command. There is a limit to meek forbearance among members of the human race, im material of creed or Color, and this logical conclusion applies to the Indian's fortitude and patience in a' degree commensurate wi...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

ADMIRAL SIMS MAKESADDRESS American Naval Officer Talks at Independence Day Celebra tion in London. HATIONS DRAW CLOSER Party Thousand American Seamen Are Now Serving on Two Hundred and Fifty War Vessels in European Waters. London. July 5.An eloquent expo sition of the amity now existing be tween England and America by Vis count Bryce, the statement by Admiral films of the American fleet that there nvere 40,000 Yankees serving on 250 United States war vessels i Eun -pean waters, and an inspiring address by General Biddle of the American army marked the Independence day celebration in Central hall here. Brings Nations Closer. "The swarming over the ocean of young American soldiers in an ever growing host, with the passion of cru aaders eager to bear the shock of bat tle in a social cause," said Viscount Bryce, "has brought Britain and Amer ica closer than they ever were under one government before that far-off day of independence which is celebrat ed here today. Rejoicing Replaces Ang...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

-w MMMMMM The Interference of Bess (Copyright, IMS, WwiUra Ntmptpn Union.) Billy frowned down Into the bowl of bis stubby pipe, while the girl watched him solicitously. "But may be/* she encouraged, I J8^8 Is not as bad as you think." "Bad!" exclaimed Billy wrathfully, "why where would I be, If dad mar ried again? Do you think he would put me through college and start me out on my career, if he were Interest ed in a new establishment of his own? No, indeedy, his second wife would take my place, and my coming wife's place, in the home. The thing to do, Bess, is to stop the affair In the bud. After a while It wIU be too late. Dad doesn't realize yet, thai he's really In love with the girl/* "Perhaps," suggested Miss Blakes lee. "he isn't" "Oh! No!" Billy sarcastically re sponded. "Then why does he spend every spare,moment of his time In her company? Biding for hours with her in the park, glowering at a fellow if he interrupts a"seance at ^the office. Dad was never like that with any o...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

When Germany TeDs the Truth Peace Term Give* Her Own People VuAf Different From Those of the Rett of the World When Germany is talking for publicationthrough the kaiser or his hand-picked chancellorshe speaks a great desire for a "liberal peace." Conquest and tribute are the farthest things from her mind, she says. When Germany is talking to her own people she tells the truth about the sort of peace she wants. Her real terms of peacethe terms the kaiser and his, chancellor promise the soldiers they are going to get when they win the warwere found in a trench taken by the allies the other day, and they are quite different from the terms advertised. They were all written out plain and emphatic, and among other things they proclaim that Bejgium must remain,under German military, economic and political domination. .Of course that isn't conquest. Conrland, Lithuania, Livonia and Esthohia are to be "colonized" by Germany. Neither is that conquest. Liberty of the seas is to be established,...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

.fWSAMUlFT MIL COST wtfses mH (/^HICAGO.The iC A lane. mm sofGOTHA CITIES Gothamites Still Fall for the Bunk of "Magic" MEW TORK."Oom, the omnipotent." has fallen afoul of the district attor- V% hey again. The law seems to have an unkind, materialistic lack of sym- pathy toward this particular psychic who in flowing purple robes sat in his home in West End avenue and coaxed dollars from the credulous. "Oom" has before been in the toils. In appearance he looks like the flap pocketed, silkshirted, pomaded parlor Us X%J^i cobra of the prewar days. He is a devil with the ladles who go in for the i cosmic urge, the assorted purple vi- -m "W\ unv orations, astral eccentricities, soul ^"jVIl^ harmonies, luminous personalities, and the rest of the weird sisterhood of psychic catch words. There are many of these spiritual magicians who are to be prosecuted on crude, impolite material criminal charges. One in the Bronx collected a tangible five-dollar bill the other day from a worried and cre...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

TO FIGHT UNTIL ORLDJS FREE IPresident Wilson Pledges the United States and Allies to No Compromise JUYS MILITARY RULE -Chief Executive Forcibly Outlines Aims for Which America and Associates Will Not Sheathe the Sword Until They Are Accomplished. Washington, July 5.In his Fourth f July address at Mount Vernon, .President Wilson said: Washington, July 5.President Wil eon in his Fourth of July address at Mount Vernon said: Gentlemen of the diplomatic corps and my fellow citizens: I am happy to draw apart with you to this quiet place of old counsel in order to speak a little of the meaning of this day of onr natfon's independence. The place seems very still and remote. It is as serene and untouched by the hurry of the world as it was in those great days long ago when General Washington -was here and held leisurely conference with the men who were to be asso ciated with him in the creation of a naatton From these gentle slopes they looked out upon the world and saw -It whole, saw it wit...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

(Copyright. 1918, by the McClure Newapa per Syndicate.) i Jean Coleman looked up as Thomas Waring came Into the office. He was half an hour late and there was some thing unusual in his manner. "Miss Coleman," he began abruptly, Tm going to get married. I'm going to be called in the next draft and I want something to leave behind me someone, I should say." The stenographer looked up quickly and smiled slightly. "Nice for the girl," she remarked noncommitally. "I realize that, but she doesn't have to do it unless she wants to. I intend to make it perfectly clear. And that's why I came to you for advice about the matteryou are so sensible, I knew you could help me. I'm going to advertise in a matrimonial journal and I'd like you to see the applicant I think the best before I accept heir will you?" It was almost too much, but Jean was equal to the occasion. Her sense of humor asserted itself and she laughed merrily. I "I'll do all I can/' she assured him. "Report to me in a week and tel...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 11 July 1918

TO FIGHT UNTIL WORLJDJS FREE tPresident Wilson Pledges the United States and Allies to !No Compromise JLAYS MILITARY RULE Xhief Executive Forcibly Outlines Aim* for Which America and Associates Will Not Sheathe the Sword Until They Are Accomplished. Washington, July 5.In his Fourth of July address at Mount Vernon, President Wilson said: Washington, July 5.President Wil ao in his Fourth of July address at Mount Vernon said: Gentlemen of the diplomatic corps and my fellow citizens: I am happy *o draw apart with you to this quiet place of old counsel in order to speak a little of the meaning of this day of onr nation's independence. The place seems very still and remote. It is as serene and untouched by the hurry of the world as it was in those great days long ago when General Washington -was here and held leisurely conference with the men who were to be asso ciated with him in the creation of a tuition. From these gentle slopes they looked out upon the world and saw it whole, saw it w...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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