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Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Sh... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 14,913 items from Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE. FAT CATTLE MARKET. Wednesday. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE. VAT CATTLE MARKET. 'Weilncsdnv. yarded, comprising-150 from South bippsland. The market opened brisklv and prices ruled oijiial to last week's im proved rates, closing firm. Quotations — 1 rimo pens of bullocks from £12 to **11 do. cows from £S 10s to £9. Loc ll sales' and averages: Bullocks—22 Moore &CoV, looloonook, £12 10s Gd; 9 P. Bucklev, Fish Creek, £12 10s; 11 R. p. NicoIi Yn"r ramle.i also 7 cows £7 10s 3d ; 10 John r«icoi, Agues Hiver, £10.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FARM JOTTINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

FARM JOTTINGS. The "discipline of the farm" is the asset of the farm boy that marks him ■ through later life. The endless round i of planting and harvesting, the daily .care of aulinals, the regular toil of which there is no cessation, to him so often a dull routine, form altogether an inestimable training in systematic hab its and thoughts that accounts for his superior achievement in the industries, commerce, and statemanship in later life. " The real opportunity for satisfac tory living in farming comes not so much from the nature of the work as from the fact that the farm is a busi ness and a home, intricately interwo ven. Life and work united, which is the natural thing. 11 is much easier to maintain soil in a satisfactory condition of efficiency, l>> crop rotation and the application of artificial manures than to restore its. after it has once been impoverished by the loss o£ fertilising constituents. In pasturing lucerne it must not be over-stocked, and the animals will...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO GET GOOD POTATOES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

TO GET GOOD POTATOES. A piece of old pasture is flue soil for potatoes. The better the turf, the better the crop. A clover sod is about the best. Put a goQd team on the plough and set the share deep down. Potatoes need a loose, deep-set bed. It is a leg-weary business to trainp back and forth across ploughed ground all day; and yet this is the price of good potatoes. Take your time to it, and be thorough. You will save time in the long run. The more harrowing the less cultivating. Get the seed well down. It mar not come up so soon, but when it does come it will shoot ahead fast. A four inch covering is about right.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LACK OF SYSTEM ON THE FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

LACK OF SYSTEM ON THE FARM. When we stop and look around, we are not surprised that there are so many farmers who are discontented, who have spent so many unprofitable years. There are so many of them robbers of the soil's fertility, and rob bers mostly come to grief," sooner or later. A man can't go on cropping Ills land year after year, and hauling the crop to market, without selling his land, too. And when both his land and his crop have gone, then—why, then he is discontented. "Farming dcn't pay."

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE ARAB'S SIGN. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

THE ARAB'S SIGN. During the Egyptian War of !SS'-' the warship holding the high road to Jerusalem at Kantara, in the Sue;; Canal, was surrounded by an atmo sphere of hostility. The one and only hotel In the place seemed to be the re luge of all the denizens of the desert.. A careful watch had ever to lie kept, the men were under arms at night as well as day, wild shouts and rushing of feet, strange bugle calls and whist ling were heard at night; the fresh provisions coming from i'ort Said every night were rushed by the prowl ing Bedouins on the banks, the whoi< or part of them taken. At time-, the desert seemed to be alive with small parties of Arabs on the prowl, always at a safe distance, but nevertheless near enough to get on the mail's nerves. This state of tilings continued for a month, when suddenly an evc-nt or curred which changed the who!.- as pect ot the situation. One night the proprietor of the ho tel came on hoard wringing his hands with grief. An important o...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Imagination. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

Imagination. The doctor was baffled and the case seemed almost hopeless, and after many different proscriptions tho pa tient still said that his health was not improving. Tho complaint was not i of a serious character, and after much , thought a happy idea seized the doc j tor. He would try his patient's pow I ers of imagination, and approached ! him in this manner. I "Sow, my friend, when I call upon > >ou again will you say *1 imagine I ! am a little better to day,' when I in ! quire after your health?" | The patient replied in the aHirma | live. The doctor called in a day or two ! and asked the patient as to his con I dltion. | lie replied, 'i imagine I am a little : better to-day. sir." | "That's right," said the doctor. "Now j the next time I call, will you say i i Imagine I am a great deal better than I was the last time you called,' which, accordingly, the patient did.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Checkmated. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

Checkmated. As most people know, when travel ling by train in America, the passen ger at the depot of departure hands over his luggage to the officials, anil i on payment of a fee receives a metal : check, which he returns in exchange j for his trunks 011 arrival at Ills des filiation. The system has its advan- ' tnges, but also its drawbacks prob- j nbly. the fatal one of loss of the j checks, for the baggage master will ; only hand over the luggage on receipt of the vouchers. j A leading light of English Comic j Opera, Miss C.P., was going from New . York to Philadelphia to join a com- j pany. Like a prudent young lady, she packed away her dollar bills in her j swanbill corsets, but her baggage , checks she had left in her pocket. Pre- i sently she fell asleep and did not ful- ; ly awake till, in a "semi-dozy" state. , she fancied she felt a slight pull at ; her dress. Opening her eyes she [ found that a very gentlemanly looking ; man was sitting next to her. Slia put . her hand i...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STRANGE COINCIDENCES Scientific and Literary Parallels. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

STRANGE COINCIDENCES Scientific and Literary Parallels. Jn the lives ol' most of us coinci dence hus played a part. Probably nine out of every ten people can re cnll events anil dates which, coincid ing with one another, are a source of wonderment. There are some coinci dences, however, which are of such a character as to call for more than casual comment. . Ill tlie November issue of the "Strand Magazine," for instance, there is a photograph illustrating a phen omenon only visible in the tropics — that of sunshine at noon when 110 sha dow is thrown by objects exposed to the sun's rays, the explanation being tiiut the ship upon which the photo graph was taken was at the moment in the exact nadir of the sun's zenith. The penomcnon was observed and re corded by Mr. W. B. Glbbs in latitude 15 (leg. South, in February of last year, and it Is a singular coincidence that precisely the same phenomenon was witnessed in 1881 or 18S2 by Cap tain W. M. Gibbs, of Cardiff, at about the same time...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
If You. See— [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

If You. See— Father wearing a purple necktie with pink riots iiml yellow stripes (on the tie, not on father), von may wager your hat Hull lather doesn't want to hurt mother's reelings. Your neighbor put all the windows up mill volumes of smoke pour out, it Is a sign he had the nerve to smoke one of Ills holiday cigars in the house.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
It Reminds 'Em. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

It Reminds 'Em. A Kivut man once said tu a friend: "1 think I'll write my recollections." "Wry good,*' said the friend, "but let me caution you not to recollect anything about celebrities that are living." "Why, what's the danger, anyway'.'" "The danger." replied the other, "is that is soon as you begin to recollect things about living celebrities they will be^in to recollect things about you."

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ONLY JOKING. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

ONLY JOKING. | The following incident occurred re cently on the down mail train between Lahore and Ambalia. There were five European passengers in a first-class reserved carriage. The guard of the train was an Eurasian of pronouncedly dark complexion, but a smart and in telligent man at his work for all that. One of the first class passengers, who was a bounder, thought he would take a rise out of the guard, so, calling him to the carriage, said: "I say, guard. I've got a hat here, a real silk bow ler, complete in case which I recently purchased from an outfitter's of Bom bay: It cost me 30 rupees, and the only fault about it is that it is a trifle too small tor me. Judging by the size of your head, it will probably fit you. Would you mind accepting it?" The guard, gratified at the prospect of sucli a present, readily expressed acceptance. The passenger, holding the hat over the panel of the carriage, said. "Here you are, guard; here's the hat, case and all, but just as the. guard p...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A GOOD VIOLIN STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

A GOOD VIOLIN STORY. A young man, poorly clothed, pre sented hlmseir before a dealer in curiosities near the Palais Royal. * "Sir," said he, showing a violin thai he carried, "I am a musical artist; this is the season of balls and parties, I have just had a long illness which lias exhausted my purse, my only blaci: coat is in pawn; 1 shall be much oblig ed if you will lend me ten francs to redeem it. I will leave as security one of the violins you see, Cor I have two; it is an excellent instrument, i shall return for It as soon as. thanks to my coat, I shall have earned enough money for the purpose." The young man had such an honest bearing that the dealer lent him ten francs, and kept the violin, which he hung up in the Bhop. The next day a gentleman, well dressed, wearing at Ills button hole the riband of the Legion of Honor, was choosing from the dealer's stock of goods some shell work. Seeing the violin, lie took It lip, examining it nar rowly. "What is the price of that instru ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Lesser Evil. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

The Lesser Evil. HHkks: Vou must have a lot of trouble keeping your wife dressed up in the height of style. (SriKss: Yes. but it's nothing to tho trouble IM hnve if I didn't. Only those who think of not hints have need of distraction.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Harmless Ghost. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

A Harmless Ghost. A stone-cutler, in the days when men wore knee-breeches and wigs, one evening wished to add a few letters to an epitaph on a gravestone recently set up. He obtained permission, and went with his tools and lantern to complete the task. The churchyard was cool and gloomy, and very soon he lighted an extra candle to give more light. Suddenly, as'he stooped over the work, he heard a curious rustling hiss—"Hush!" He lifted his head and looked round i but saw nothing. He fell to work again; but no nooner was his head bowed over the stone than the faint, mysterious "hush!" was heard again. He could stand it no longer, but got up and lied for his life, and was not consoled until he was in bed and fast asleep. The next morning he was silting with bis wife at breakfast, when she said suddenly, "IVtor. what is the matter with your wig? It is all burnt on one side." I He gave a cry of joy, to his w ife's , surprise. The mystery was explain ed—the strange "hush" was nothing mor...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

GENERAL CARE AND FEEDING. No branch of dairy Tanning is more important than the feeding anil treat ment of cows; yet none is more gen erally neglected. The direct influence of what the cow cats and drinks upon tho milk sho produces cannot be too strongly impressed upon the attention of tlie farmer. Of equal importance aie the conditions under which food and drink are taken. If cows are chased by dogs or over-driven, or wor ried by boys on their way to pasture, their milk will surely show the effects in a deterioration of quality. If their shelter in winter or shade in summer is insuillcient, or the food is not suf ficiently nutritive, the penalty will in variably be paid in a smaller milk yield. These restrictions are inevi table. Ouo of the greatest mistakes far mers make is in supposing that tliey may with impunity keep their cows on "short commons" during the win ter and that they will fatten up in the spring, and milk as well as ever. A cow reduced to meagreness by semi starvati...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCOURING CALVES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

SCOURING CALVES. From experiments carried out in Germany it is claimed to liave been discovered that sour milk given to calves from the first to the fifth "day of their lives, forms an .excellent pre ventive of scour. The constant losses —sometimes o[ valuable pedigree calves—are well known in most herds, and are attributed to the curdling of the milk in the stomach. The bacteria | in sour milk are supposed to act bene llcially. In Germany it is called yog hurt, produced by adding Bacillus bill gariens to milk. This generates lac tic acid in the stomach of the calves, which acts as a disinfectant, and pre ■ vents the development of the hurt fill bacteria, and at the same time sti mulates the activity o£ the intestine, probably by producing a ferment that | destroys the bacilli which give, rise, to scour.

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Insufferable. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

Insufferable. "So you broke your engagement with him?" "Yes." "What for?" "lie's a conceited thins. I simply couldn't stand him." "I never heard him brag. What makes ypu think him conceited?" "All the time we were engaged h«' never once told me that he was un worthy of my love."*"

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WARTS ON TEATS. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

WARTS ON TEATS. Many people fail to get rid of warts because they think it can only be done with great dilllculty, or by tearing the wart bodily assay, but this is not the cast;. When cows are milked twice a day It does not seem to afford much opportunity to get rid of warts. To use any substance of a poisonous nature for the wart is dangerous in many ways. When the teats are cliappcd only, some kind of soothing ointment should ho applied, and for this pur pose carbolised vaseline, and other preparations may be procured from the chemist. This will heal the teat up in a short time, and allow the milk ing to be carried on without any dis comfiture to the cow. Ill the case of warts, when small they can generally bo got rid of by touching them with caustic soda. An other simple remedy, and one which in many cases has been found to he successful; rub the wart with vinegar, then while it Is still wet dust it with dry carbonate of soda. If this is done after each milking, the warts will gr...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VETCHES OR TARES. [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

VETCHES OR TARES. Vetches or tares are of two distinct kinds—those sown in the autumn for spring or early summer use, and those sown in the spring which come in after the winter sowing is used up. There are few crops which yield such a large amount of succulent green food, though perhaps for special pur poses other crops are preferable, hut for general use and under all condi tions tares cannot be beaten. The amount of soeil required per acre is about three bushels of tares and one bushel of oats or rye, the latter beiiu; sown to keep the tares off the ground I Spmewhat and so prevent rotting in wet weather. In order to gain the full benefits from growing tills green crop the sow ings should be made at different inter vals, beginning as early as possible, when the land can be prepared, so that successive cuttings are obtained without allowing them to become ripe. Tares are more suitable for soiling purposes than grazing,as this latter plan Is very wasteful, much of the food being tr...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE BUSY BEE [Newspaper Article] — Gippsland Standard and Alberton Shire Representative — 1 May 1914

THE BUSY BEE Winter is close upon us. In the coolest ot our districts bees have al ready retired, and before the niont'i is out the retirement will be general. During the warmer portions of the days, especially it' the sun is bright, the bees will still venture out, but they will not wander far from homo ii last month's advice lias been at tended to, i.e., if they are supplied with sufllcicnt honey to carry them on till spring, or the coming breeding season. If bees are forced to go for aging on bright winter days, the sud den atmospheric changes prevent the return of many, and a good supply of food in the hive is the only remedy. It also forms one of the best methods to keep up the warmth of the hive. On every occasion when the weather is bright and drying, remove the wraps, etc., from the hives, and spread them out to dry. External dampness produces internal dampness, which is one of the most proline causes of di sease. Just before sundown return the protections to the hives. The ...

Publication Title: Gippsland Standard And Alberton Shire Representative
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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