ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Western Mail Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 1,028,759 items from Western Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
1,028,759 results
A Victorian Garden. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

A Victorian Garden. The orchard of Mr. James GUI, Sunnyside, Koonong Creek, is situated about a mile south of the Doncaster Post office, SOUP nine miles from Melbourne. Mr. Gill, like nearly all other orchardists, found, when he purchased the ground ten years ago, a great many sorts, someof which, though possessed of certain good qualities, ! were not the most profitable as market varie i ties. A, large amount of heading down and grafting was performed, so that there is not perfect uniformity amongst them, but alt, with the exception of the peaches and apricots already mentioned, are in a most vigorous condition. The Cherry Plum or Myrobalan (Prunus myrobalan) forms an ex- cellent Btock for nearly all stone fruit?, es- pecially for plums of all kinds. Mr. QUI has a large tree of the Chinese Sand pear (Pyrus ^u^^B^^^^^h^^^e^c^^^d^^^^^^^e, j only fit» for cooking purposes, but it bas ti advantage ot remaining in perfect healtt none of the fuugoid diBeaseB with which tb common pear is ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Rose Growing for Beginners. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

Rose trowing for Beginners. The following excellent practical advice upon the above subject is from the Bural Australian : Bose growing is really a very easy matter I indeed, if beginners will be satisfied to start j with some of the old and best known roses. If a beginner purchases a lot of the newest and most expensive roses to start with, and I finis they do not at once yield him a good return for his rather extravagant outlay, he is apt to be discouraged, and to throw up rose growing in disgust. But if he wisely plants a few of the commonest, hardiest* and cheapest sorts, and finds they thrive and produce thousands of beautiful Sowers with little or no care and attention, he is induced to try and grow other and improved varie- ties, and with some hope of success. There are many well-known old favourite roses anyone may grow, and they are cer- tainly very beautiful, and Buit almost all soils and situations. Let these be grown first, and then the knowledge of roses a hs-' ginner w...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Ladies' Page. All communications for this col[?]mn should be written on one side of the paper only, and be addressed to HOUSEWIFE, WESTERN MAIL OFFICE, Perth. THE KITCHEN. HOW TO COOK FISH. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

LAH communications for this colnmn should be written on one side of the paper only, and be addressed to HOUSEWIFE, WESTERN MAIL OFFICE, Perth. |BY A HOUSEWIFE."] THE KITCHEN. How TO COOK TISH. "When baying fish great care should fee taken that it is perfectly fresh, for there is not a more objectionable article of food when stale. One very good indi- cation that a fish is fresh is the redness of the gills-the redder the gill the fresher the fish. If the scales of the tish rub off easily, it is a sure sign of staleness. A very good rale is to always choose plump fish. lu boiling fish it is a common error to pat in an insufficient supply of salt. Of coarse, I presume that every one will understand that fish must be put into cold water. Salt should be added in the pro- portion of nearly half a pound of salt to a gallon of water for large fish. As soon as the water boils, a great deal of scmn will rise to the top. This, of coarse, must be constantly removed ; if it is not removed, it wi...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CHAPTER II. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

CHAPTER II. Bright sunbeams st) earned through Beckett's wiudow wheu he awoke. He sprang up hastily with a feeling that no time was to be lost, and looking at his watch found himself late. Dres- sing quickly he turned away, leaving the watch on the table as he thought of its value, but came back from the threshold to put it in his pocket, struck by the fear that premeditation would be suggested were he found without it. Then he strode down stairs, along the street, across the long railway bridge, past the town outskirts and luto the wide cutting through the woods. lu imagination ho traced the night of the approaching train; now she must be whistling at Moiton, now puffing away from Maplcdale, now groaning up the mountain grade, now hidden in the long tuunel. Within a few minutes she should come into view around the distant curve ! He looked looked at his watch and turned back toward Bastonvale. A huge longing to see his wife and children once more came over him, and even a mad yearn...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A Home-made Fruit Ladder. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

A Home-made Fruit Ladder. À fruit ladder is one of those convenien- ces which may be made in winter in the farm workshop, to be in readiness when required for me. To make it, select a pole 18 feet -long, or of the desired length. At about 4 s£eet from the top or smaller end of the pole, nail on a band of hoop iron to prevent split ti nf, and rip up the pole in the centre as far as the band. The halves of the pole are spread apart 3¿ feet at the base and secured. .The places for the rungs are then laid out Hand holes bored. Those for the lower rangs .should be If inch, the upper 1 inch ; drive (them in place and wedge fast. The distance 'between the rangs is usually 1 foot ; when f further apart they are fatiguing in ase. A gladder'of tiiin kind, on account of its small

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
HIS HONOUR AND BIJAH. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

HIS HONOUB AND BLTAH. She rapped at the door of the station house as Biiah was sweeping out and making ready for court, and he kindly called out ; " Come in ma'am-come right in and make yourself to hum." She entered. She was a woman with a cold, stony glare in her eyes, and her nose had the sauciest sort of a turn up at the end. " I want my husband !" she said, biting her words off with a clean edge. "Tes, ma'am-jess so. Is your hubby dear a little red-headed man with a milky spot in his left eye." Sir I" " Or he may be in No. 6-tall, lathy chap with a melancholy cast of count- enance. If he's the chap I can't say that I admire your taste." " Sir ! I called to seo my husband, and I want none of your talk ! His name is Clemens." " 'Zactly, ma'am, but I must have an order you know." "I didn't get one." " Then you can't go in." " But I will 1" " Alas 1 but you won't !" " I'm going into the corridor, and if you dare to stop me I'll make it cost you dear !" When he bad carried her to the...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Not much Fight. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

Not much Fight. Agréât big overgrown tough entered a saloon one day in search of gore. He was " primed," and he asserted that he was ugly. He even acknowledged that he intended to hurt somebody before he got out, and it would be an inquiry requiring the united service of at least three eminent surgeons. The barkeeper was reading a novel, bead down and elbows on'the bar, and he did not look up as the big tough called out-" Set 'em up ? I tell you to set 'em up for all hands r" An old farmer who had been warming his shins got up and sneaked out. He said he did'nt purpose to go back home to Maria a cripple for life. He was followed by a kinky youth with brick coloured hair, who observed that the dootor had forbidden him to fight for the next three weeks. " Are you going to set 'em up ?" howled the tough. " No," was the quiet reply, "Then the con- sequences be upon your head." With this he peeled off his coat, and the two remaining men bolted for the door. One excused bim-\ self on the ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Toll-Keeper's Hidden Grief. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

The Toll-Keeper's Hidden Grief. A traveller stopped at the toll-gate and asked the' keeper if he had «rood, cool water. '?'John," said the keeper, turning to his son, " fetch me the gun-the one loaded with buck-shot." . " Hold on !" said the traveller, " I mean no barm." "Well, then, Til let you off." The traveller rode on, wondering why the question had caused offence. He stopped at a boase and asked a man if he conld tell him why the gate-keeper became angry. " Yes, I can tell you. He has to carry water about a mile and a half, and it's al- ways warm by the time he getB home with it. Every one that comes along asks if he's got good cool water. He scarcely hears anything else from morning until night. The man who kept the gate last year went crazy, but this fellow seems to stand it better. He is rather even-tempered, and although he has kept the gate several montba he has only killed two drummers and crippled a boy. I kept the gate once." " Did the people annoy you?" " Not mach, I ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
POSITION OF BED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

PosmoN OF BED. A. few years ago this question was dis- cussed in the Builder, the editor of which, journal appears to have dealt with tho matter in a practical way. He says : " Years age I suffered much from nerrous irritation, and consequent loss of sleep. I fancied that I slept better in certain rooms than others ; and, trying to ascer- tain why, came to the conclusion that a great deal depended on the position of the bed. For twenty-five years and upwards I have had my bed placed with the head to the north, or as near that point as I can, and if I cannot have it north I place it north-east, with as much north as I can get. When I sleep from home I pull out the bedstead from the wall and turn it to the desired point as nearly as I can, find- ing great advantage. Many of my friends, I knowing my fancy, take care to put mo in a room with the bed in the right position. They smile at wy whim. I sleep, and I smile at their unbelief." There is farther evidence in this direction given by...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
WHAT TO DO WHEN DRESS CATCHES FIRE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

WHAT TO DO WHEN DBESS CATCHES PXEE. The following useful hints to ladies as to what they should do in case of their dresses taking fire have been communi- cated to the Times by John Marshall, F.R.S. :-" A girl or woman who meets with this accident should immediately lie down on tho floor, and anyone who goes to her assistance should instantly, if she still be erect, make her lie down, or, if needful throw her down into a horizontal position, and keep her in it. Sparks fly upwards with fearful rapidity ; and, as a result well known to experts, the fatality or disfigurement in these lamentable cases is due to the burns inflicted about the body, neck, face, and head, and not to injuries of the lower limbs. Now, the very moment that the person whose clothes are on fire is in a horizontal posi- tion on a flat surface, the flames still ascend, bnt only into the air, and not en- circling their victim. Time is thus gain- ed for further action, aud, in such a crisis in a fight against fire, ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SCRAPS. IRISH LACE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

SCRAPS. IRISH LACE. The Irish lace ! How many kinds there are, and how beautiful aud varied! The best known, says the Queen, is perhaps the Garriclcmacross, called par excellence Irish point, which consists of fine muslin la'd on net, but not always on net, with the design outlined m thc finest cord, worked over, and the edges cut away. ! Thc design is connected by small bars. Then next comes Limerick lace, with its pattern worked in tambour stitch on a net ground. This lace is not so' much made as formerly, for, with modern machinery, an imitation of it has been so well pro» duced, that it baa considerably spoilt the market for the real. The Wexford lace is totally different from others, and is in the style of the coarse old Italian " reti cella," or drawn work of centuries ago, which is so often confused with, and taken for, Greek lace. The material is coarse linen, and the pattern is produced by the the threads being drawn away, and then worked over by the same threads, in strong...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
"RAINY-DAY BONNETS." [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

"RA,INY>DAY BONNETS." "Rainy-day bonnets "are adopted by New York belles when obliged to go out in bad weather. They are made of water groof staff to match the cloak or ulster, ut are so elaborately trimmed with waterproof ribbon as to form quite a coquettish head-gear.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
MILK AS A. STIMULANT. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

MILK AS A. STIMULANT. Hot milk is an admirable stimulant. Milk heated too much above ¡100 degrees Farenheit loses for a time a degree of its sweetness and density. No ono who, fatigued by over exertion of body and mind, has ever experienced the reviving influence of a tumbler of this beverage, heated as hot as it can be sipped, will willingly forego a resort to it because of its being rendered somewhat less accept- able to the palate. Tho promptness with, which its cordial influence is felt is indeed surprising. Borne portion of it seems to be digested and appropriated almost im- mediately, and many who now fancy they need alcoholic stimulants, wheu exhausted by fatigue, will find in this simple draught an equivalent that will be abundantly satisfying and far more enduring in its effects. This should be taken note of by all hard working people.

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
RECEIPTS [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

ltEOEIPTS. BEEFSTEAK AND OYSTER PIE.-Take two pounds of gravy beef, or beefsteak, if preferred; cut it into strips about 2¿ inches wide ; beat it with a wooden mallet or rolling pin. Mix on a plate two tablespoonfuls of flour, a teaspoonful of mixed herbs (thyme, marjoram, parsley), a square inch of lemon rind minced, salt and pepper. Dip each piece of beaten meßt into this ; place an oyster on one end and roll np loosely; place in the bottom of a pie-dish, pile well up towards the centre. Do not pack the rolls tightly, so that the gravy may flow through and help to cook them. Add the oyster liquor and some stock ; corer with a flaky crust, ornainen', brush over with egg, and bake over one and a half hour. N.B. -If oysters ara not liked, substitute kidneys, sausage meat, er hard-boiled eggs and onious. APPLE FRITTERS.-Make a smooth, stiff batter of a pound of flour, a little salt, one tablespoonful of clarified butter, three well-beaten eggs, about a quarter of a pint of milk, and a...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
COLD BEEF AND MUTTON. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

COLD BEEF AND MUTTON. Out the meat from the joint in good sized thick pieces. Slice two or three beet roots, and one cucumber, and pat them into a pan with a lettuce, an onion, pepper and salt, a small piece of butter, and a little stock or water. Set the stew pan on the stove, and when the vegetables have stewed till they are tender, add to ? /them some boiled peas and the meat. Let / the whole stew till the meat is well warmed J through, and then serve it with the meat ! piled high in the centre of the dish, and the vegetables nicely arrayed around it. 38b. 2.-Mash some potatoes, either in a plain way or with hot milk and the yolk of an egg, and add some batter and salr. Slice some cold beef, and lay it at the bottom of a pie-dish, adding some sliced shalots, pepper, salt, and some beef gravy. Cover the whole with a thick layer vf the potatoes, and make the crust to rise like a pie crust. Score it over with the point of j a knife in squares of equal size. Put the dish before the f...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
THE WORK TABLE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

THE WORK TABLE. UEOTCHET DESIGN FOB SHAWLS 1ST ROW.-Make a chain the length re- quired. Work one double into a stitch, five chain ; pass over five stitches, and repeat. 2nd row : One double into the third of five chain of last row, five chain ; one double into the third of next Ifire «hain, five double trebles into the double of last row between the loops of fire chain. * One double into the third of next five chain, five chain. Repeat from * twice more; then repeat from the beginning of the row. 3rd, like first row. 4th row : Like second, working the fire double trebles into the chain between the two clusters of five double trebles of last row to form the pattern. The shawl may be made any size; it should be finished with a ball fringe or a crochet lace about three inches deep. TUFT STITCH CROCHET. - lat row : One double into each stitch. 2nd row : One double into a stitch, draw up a loop through the next stitch, draw the right side of the loop with the finger and thumb of left han...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
FASHIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

FASHIONS. "Queeu Bee" in the Australasian says : -Tne first show of the season was opened last Tuesday in the establishment of Messrs. Robertson and Moffat, and it needed bnt a glance to note that the pro- mise of good things from home had been amply fulfilled. In the silk department there is mach that is new, and first place must be given to the " peates " silks. Tita word " peute " means a valance, but this docs not very accurately describe tho material. In ordinary terms it stands for faille Francaise, having woven on its I surface horizontal bands of plash or vel- vet, which are graduated downwards. I These silks, on account of their richness, aro used only for skirts and panols. I Broché silks are no longer seen, but moire are coming morennan ever to the front, i SilkB with natte or frise stripes are also ! now. Other novelties are the " cashmere I de soie perse," beautiful in colouring, the ; ground being darker than the design, which is always covered. These silks are i also ...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

W,A. TURF CLUB. AUTUMN MEETING-APRIL 13, 1886. THE following are the WEIGHTS for the HANDICAP BACES at this Meeting, de- clared by the Handicapper, Mr. W. B. Mitchell LADIES' BRACELET-1| MILES. at. lb. Young Banker ... ... 12 0 Rosebery ... ... ... ll 7 My Lord .ll 7 Hero . ... ll 3 Rocket ... ... ... 10 3 Fenian ... ... ... 9 12 Sir Garnet. ... 9 32 Garnet ... ... 9 9 Harry ... ... ... 9 9 Euclid ... ... ... 9 9 Larrikin ... ... ... 9 9 Sinbad ... ... ... 9 6 AUTUMN HANDICAP-2 MILES. Bt. lb. Tremando ... ... ... 9 12 Young Banker ... ... 9 9 Barley Bree ... ... ... 9 7 War Cry .9 5 My Lord ... .. ... 9 0 Rosebery ... ... ... 9 0 Hero .8 10 Rocket ... .7 12 Sir Garnet. ... 7 7. Harry ... ... ... 7 0 Banter ... ... ... 6 12 Sinbad ... ... ... 6 12 BERTH HANDICAP-3 MILES . st. lb. Tremando ... ... ... 9 12 Barley Bree ... ... ... 9 9 Young Banker ... ... 9 7 War Cry ... ... ... 9 5 Rosebery ... ... ... 9 0 MyLord .9 0 Hero .... 8 10 Fenian ... ... ... 8 0 Sh* Garnet ... ... ... 7 7 Ba...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
The Present System of Education. [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

The Present System of Education. Mr. (JOERGB evidently has a poor opin- ion of tlie lessons taught in schools. The -system he thinks appeals too much to the memory, and to momentary, and therefore "deceptive results the higher faculties of the mind are sacrificed. The aim of schools " seems to be to stuff the head« of the young with a tarago which can -never produce thinkers, and can never improve the masses morally and socially. The craze of making people learned in- stead of wise is moreover recklessly pur- sued al the expense of health and happi- ness." The truth of such remarks will be recognised by those who have endeavour »ed, to get children to practically demon- strate the utility of what they have learn ~ed at school. A child in almost any school will perhaps glibly repeat to you .a list of the principal seas, rivers, moun- tains and islands in tho world, or he may parse a sentence with commendable skill, or work out a sam in one of the simpler . or even the higher rules of...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SECOND DAY. LADY'S BRACELET [Newspaper Article] — Western Mail — 20 March 1886

SECOND DAY. LADY'S BRACELET A welter weight handicap, value ¿0 guineas, with a swesp of £2 added, lo stat lat 1 p.m. Distance l| miles. Nominations 10s. ; ac- ceptances JOs ; entrance 10s. To be ridden for by mombers of the Club. Horses to be .nominated by ladies. LADIES' PURSE. A selling race of ¿620. To start at 1-45 p.m. Distance once round the course. Entrance £110s. Heats. Conditions same as Selling Race On first day AVON HANDICAP. Of ¿650. To start at 3 p.m. 3 miles ; with a sweep of one sov. added ; nomination one sov. ; acceptance one sov. ; entrance one sov. Winner of the Easter Handicap will carry a penalty of 71bs in this race. PONY RACE. Of £5. To start at 3.45. Once round the course ; heats : catch weights ; 13 hands 3 inches and under ; post eames. Nominations for the above handioaps, with age. pedigree, description, and performances to be forwarded to the Hon Secretary on or before the 1st March ; acceptances on or be- fore the 1st April ; entrances or or before the d...

Publication Title: Western Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x