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Elephind.com contains 4,114 items from Direct Action, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Every copy of 'Direct Action' sold is a kick at the boss. Get subs. SYDNEY LOCAL. MEETINGS, &c. Street Fropoganda at Bathurst aad Liverpool Streets Every Friday and Saturday Evenings, at 8 p.m.; also Sun day Evening, at 7. Meetings in Hall: Sunday, 8 p.m., Propoganda. Wednesday, 8 p.m., Economic Class. Thursday, 8 p.m., Business Meeting. Also, Public Meeting Every Sunday Afternoon in the Domain.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WAR! WHAT FOR? [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

WARS WHAT FOR? We have a limited supply of the above book, printed on superior pa per, iand atta actively bound, -which will be forwarded to any address up on receipt of cash for 4s 6d. In con junction with 'Put Up The Sword,' the two volumes will be forwarded upon receipt of cash for 7s. Address: Box 98, Haymarket P.O., N.S.W.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Sound The Alarm. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Sound The Alarm. Time after time, during the dark and bloody struggles of the workers through the ages, the cowardice and tieachery of the workers' leaders liave turned victory into defeat. It was the case with the plebians of Ancient Rome. It was the case with the workers of the Middle Ages. It is the case to-day. The workers combine. They make infinite sacrifices. Tliey strike and starve and endure numberless priva tions and martyrdoms, in order to build up powerful organisations. Tiiey contribute money — which to them re presents blood and sweat poured out in industrial infernos — so as to keep the organisations intact. Then tney take men from their own class, give them positions of power and import ance, put them at the head of their organisations, and enable tliem to live better than their fellows. These officials and leaders mix with the representatives of the ruling class. Their outlook insensibly changes. And then, at the critical time, right on the eve of success, these men...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL No. 6. HALL, LANE ST., BOULDER, W.A. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL No. 6. HALL, LANE ST., BOULDER, W.A. Wednesday Evenings, in Hall — Class Meeting. Friday Evening, Boulder Post Office — Propaganda Meeting. Saturday Evening, Kalgoorlio — Propa- ganda Meeting. Sunday Morning, 10.30 a.m., Hall — Bush? ess Meeting. Sunday Afternoon, Keane's Goldfields Hotel, Athletic Club, at 2.30 — Lec- ture. Sunday Evening, Boulder — Propaganda Meeting. Good Library at Hall. All Beds are Invited to dig In and make Industrial Unionism the Topic of the Day. F. H. LUNN.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHEARERS AND SHEDHANDS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

SHEARERS AND SHEDHANDS. The following placard was found in a shearing shed in the West of Queensland: — DON'T GO OUT ON STRIKE! Short pay, short work'. Decrease profits and strike the contractor in the pocket-book. Do your work ex tra carefully! Shear twenty sheep well sooner than tomahawk 200. H you start rushing you will very like ly cut and maim the sheep. Don't allow sand and chips to get into your machine — it will run hot. Don't run hot yourself rushing in to the pen for a catch. If your ma chine runs hot wrap a piece of cloth round it. Oil it plenty and often. If this does not cure it, see the expert. If you get overheated yourself be very careful to obey your physician's orders. Don't allow the board to get dirty; sweep it up carefully. Pick up all fleeces carefully. It takes time to do work properly as it should be done. If the wool tables are full, put your fieece on the floor or anywhere the boss may direct. Put it down care fully, so that you can pick it up again. Skirt ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Power of The Strike. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

The Power of The Strike. (By F.H.) In a recent article on 'War Work shops,' a representative of the 'Syd- ney Sun' makes a remarkable admis sion about the power of the strike. Referring to the 'patriotism and self sacrifice' of those semi-skilled work ers who have become munitionmak ers, in the midlands and north of Eng land, the 'Sun' correspondent says — 'TO THESE MEN THE EMPIRE OWES LASTING GRATITUDE. THEY BELONG TO GREAT AND POWERFUL UNIONS ? THEY COULD ENSURE DEFEAT FOR THE EMPIRE BY MERELY STOPPING WORK.' Though not concerned, just here, about the 'patriotism and selfsacri lice' of the workers concerned, we may remark, in passing, that it is merely a negligible factor. Economic pressure, backed up by the police and the newly developed Industrial Con scription, being the real reason for keeping 'hard at it.' The present writer was in England last summer when the South Wales miners ceased work and thereby forc ed substantial gains from the greedy owners. During that crisis, the ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Lock-out at Broken Hill. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Lock-out at Broken The following telegram appeared in the daily press on January 11th: — BROKEN HILL, Monday.— When the underground men presented themselves for work this morning, those who failed to go to work on Saturday aflernoon were told they were discharged. The other un derground men at once decided not to go below, and soon all were off the leases. South mine was un able to start its mill for want of ore, but the Proprietary had enough ore on hand -to keep going until lour o'clock this afternoon, while the Central had well filled bins, and was able to proceed as usual. The De Bavay plant, which relies on tailings from South and Nonh Mines, had to close down probably for a couple of days. None of the other mines were aSected. The men affected number approxi mately 2200, in addition to 300 on De Bavay's, and the mill hands on other mines. At a largely attended meeting held at noon, resolutions were car ried asking the A..M.A. to call out all iis members at broken Hill, Cockle ...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW SOCIETY GAME. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

NEW SOCIETY GAME. The first of the new munition fac tories in the London area to be staff ed by women was opened up last month. London 'Standard' says that with the exception of skilled fitters to attend to the machines when they break down, a few temporary men to instruct the women, and the skilled staff of the auxiliary shops, the fac tory is entirely 'manned' by women. A large staff of public school and society women volunteers has been undergoing a course of training to fit themselves for overlookers in the various departments, and they will assume full responsibility for super vising the work of the girls who are to feed the machines. This item of news is interesting, in view of the number of times we have been told by the capitalist press that caste and class prejudices should be cast aside during the war. The dainty belles of society must not be allowed to stain their precious hands, and are given jobs as bosses over the com mon herd of females. This is, of course, entirely a...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TO PREPARE FOR WAR MEANS TO PREPARE FOR PEACE. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

TO PREPARE FOR WAR MEANS TO PREPARE FOR PEACE. By Massage. If men learn their trade thorough ly and make a study of it, they do detest doing bad work. I have known plenty of niea to give up slop work at high wages, and work for less do ing expert work, as it gave them the necessary opportunity to show off j their skill. They have prepared j themselves to do good work and they I must do it at all costs. 1 If you notice our life-savers on the ] beaches, how delighted they are if j somebody is carried out by the un- * dertow. On the Newcastle beach one \ day twenty-five were rescued — not \ one of them carried out. But the j life-savers pounced upon them and \ dragged them out of the surf. You \ see it gets on their nerves if nobody \ is in trouble, and they suffer great ? discomfort, because they are trained j up to all tactics in life-saving. \ Having prepared themselves to ; save lives, they will go to the ex- k treme and drag them out when they ; are not in trouble just to show off...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

SUBSCRIBERS. Subscribers who do not receive their 'Direct Action' regularly and promptly, are requested to write to the Manager, and give particulars, so that he may take steps to get the matter remedied.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Fremantle Activities. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Fremantle Activities. ? * ? . Esplanade, Perth. Speakers: F. W. Reeves and Miller. Subject: 'Peace en earth, goodwill to all men.' This was one of the best-attendea and appreciated lectures held on the Esplanade for a long time past. ''Direct Action' sold out rapidly The news of Fellow-worker Joe Hill's martyrdom made a big im pression. During the interval, while on the sales of books, a challenge was thrown at the I.W.W. by the secretary-president of the A.W.U of Perth, to debate the subject oi 'Why the A.W.U. cannot become an Industrial Union?' This challenge while being the means of selling out all the copies of that grand little book of ours under that title, was gladly accepted by Fellow-workef Reeves, who was pleased to get someone in authority to help him explain in public the difference be tween an Industrial Union built on scientific lines, as per the I.W.W., as against a conglomeration of small un ions loosely drawn together under one name, but retaining all the evils of t...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Outlook For Labor. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

The Outlook For Labor. ? ♦- ? . (From 'Solidarity,' U.S.A.). Taking a view of the life of the n-ilers, past and present, we find it one of pain and struggle for the ma t.-.-rial things of life. The greater tiie productive power of the workers, the more intense the struggle for I'xisience. Attempts made by work ers to improve their conditions are iuet with cue argument — taat of force. We are learning that all institu tions, whether of church or state, ii-st upon material interest, ajid out of this grow the religious and ethical standards. And in this also lies the basis of all progress, not in those so-called moral institutions which would have us go through the realms of the unknown for our salvation. Rather is this last a power for evil, as it deadens the spirit of resistance aaainst wrong and oppression, justi fying exploitation, making it possible for tho ruling class to exploit the toiling millions of earth with greater security. These suave gentlemen of the robe have their pro...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Direct Action At Broken Hill. CRAFT UNION TACTICS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Direct Action At Broken Hill. CRAFT UNION TACTICS. Fellow-worker, — For the benefit of readers of 'Direct Action,' I think it incumbent that some of the Fellow workers should write up the doings in Craft Union circles in this dis trict, so I am taking the responsibil ity of doing so. As you are aware, some months ago, the A.M.A. cited a case in the Federal Arbitration Court for better conditions, and mainly a 44-hour week. By way of hurrying the busi ness along a bit, it was decided by the militant minority that .it would be a good plan to have a spell every week-end by missing the Saturday afternoon shift. This was put into practice, and after a couple of Sat urdays off (only a very few scab bing), the practice has become gen eral, and the slaves like it so well that they wouldn't think of going back again to the old style. Well, in connection with the busi ness, the A.M.A. wouldn't endorse it at any price, so the militant minority bad to be up and doing. A meeting of all undergrou...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
STICKERS. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

STICKERS. The Press Committee have plenty of I.W.W. Stickers on hand. They are in large type, smart, and to the point. Each Sticker has an imprint on it, in accordance with the boss's law. We will send along 1,000 to any address in Australia for 2/9, 5,000 for 12/, and 10,000 for £1/2/6. Please send cash with order. Orders will' be sent to New Zealand, provided 3d extra is enclosed per thousand for adoii ??.???v.-.j postage. Address: Manager, Box 98, Haymarket, N.S.W. # # # ADELAIDE READERS Can obtain copies of 'Direct Ac tion' and Industrialist Literature from Charlie Russell, bootmaker, Gibson-street, Bowden. Adelaide, S.A.

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE "WHY" OF IT. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

THE 'WHY' OF IT. The following from the 'Outlook,' by Lieut.-Col. W. H. Maxwell, throws an interesting side-light on 'the need for conscription' :* — 'The abuse of personal freedom has reached its climax in this coun try. Trade Unionism — that shelter for slinking shirkers — is imperilling our existence, and by its action a rot of our national soul has set in. One remedy, and one alone, can era dicate this 'state of rot1— martial law will cure it. With the knowledge that refusal to assist in the nation's defence means 'death' to the indivi dual so refusing, the shirker would soon be brougtit to his senses and fall in wherever required. All who incite to rebellion to be shot at ones by order of drumhead court martial, would have a very steadying effect. England must live. The individual does not count to-day. If Parliament will not act, then let a Cromwell come in and settle the question— he will be welcomed.'

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Pleasant Visit To The Nether World. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

A Pleasant Visit To The Nether World. A moaning wind blew fitfully, and caused Unearthly music on that dismal shore, As 'neath a gloomy cypress shade I paused With fearful feet, yet eager to ex plore The land that stretched beyond. While thus I stood, Perplexed and hesitant, beside that sombre wood, Along the shore laved by it's blood red tide, A wan-faced ghost approached, my steps to guide. A rudely-fashioned cross he led me to, Whereon was nailed a man of mighty girth, From where a jagged stake was driven through, His entrails spilt and draggled on the earth. I, stood aghast, astonished at the sight, Until the shade explained the fat man's plight, / Then on the cross I saw in letters rude — 'On earth this man adulterated food.' Then to a sunken pit the way ne led, In which a man, with horrid screams and oaths, As ceaslessly around the pit he sped, Did strive with frantic haste to shed his clothes; Inside his shirt, and underneath his pants, Ran swarms of fierce and active bull-do...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

MELBOURNE ACTIVITIES. Local No. 8, 24=3 William Street. Monday, 8 p.m.: Business Meeting. Thursday, 8 p.m.: Educational Class. Working Class Economics.— T. Turn er, Instructor. Friday, 8.30 p.m.: Propaganda Meet ing, Brunswick, corner Sydney Eosd and Victoria Street. Sanday: Propaganda Meeting. Yarra Bank. The rooms are open to all workers every night. All working class papers on file. Good Library. A welcome to all the 'disobedient ones.'

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
I. W. W. Preamble. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

I. W. W. Preamble. The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people, and the few who make up the employing class have all the good things of life. Between these two classes a struggle must go on until the workers of the world organise as a class, take possession of the earth and the machinery of production, and abolish the wage system. We find that the centreing of the management of industries into fewer and fewer hands makes the trade unions unable to cope with the ever-growing power of the employing class. The trade unions foster a state of affairs which allows one set of workers to be pitted against another set of workers in the same industry, thereby helping to defeat one another in wage wars. Moreover, the trade unions aid the employing class to mislead the workers into the belief j that the working-class have interests in common with their em ployers. 1 These conditions...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Propaganda Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

Propaganda Notes. The meeting of the Sydney Local 1 en the Domain on last Sunday was, ! as usual, very successful. Literature j sales, paper sales, and the collection : were up to the usual standard. Fel- I low Workers Teen , King, Glyun' aiui Barker were tne speakers. At the close F. W. King had many interest ing questions to a:uswer. # * * The Bathurst-street meeting, on . Sunday evening was a bit of a start ler. The I.W.W. fully expected Mr. Black's police to be there to stop us from holding a meeting. There was, however, no trouble from that direc tion. ] On the meeting starting with the I usual song, 'The Preacher and the j Slave,' Adjutant Slattery, of the Sal- j vation Army which had just termin- I ated its own meeting, tried to create I a disturbance. In order to avoid I trouble, he was offered the use of the I I.W.W. platform, which he accepted. j On the platform, he accused the 1 I.W.W. of being 'out-o'-works,' 'pro- ] Germans,' and 'cowards.' Addressing 1 his remarks more...

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Direct Action — 15 January 1916

'DIRECT ACTION.' Enclosed please find P.O. for 4s., for ?which please send 'Direct Action' for one year to the following address:—

Publication Title: Direct Action
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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