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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

I w. The Indian Advocate Vol. XIV. MARCH, 1902. No. 3 ST. JOSEPH'S MONTH. Saint of the Childhood and the Hidden Life, i Why is it that thy Month is always Lent? What hadst thou with the Passion? Mary went To Calvary with Jesus; but the knife Of that fierce sorrow was spared thee. Thy strife In anxious care and fostering patience spent: Now 'to a stable, now to Egypt sent, And then long years with humblest labor rife; ' But this thy portion of the coming cross Which o'er thy path its forward shadow threw, And is not ours like thine to walk content In that long shadow, counting all things loss Save what for Jesus we endure and do? To teach us this thy month is always Lent. Brui'h force may crush the heart but cannot kill; The mind, that thinks, no terrors can compel; But it will speak at length and boldly tell The world its weakness and its rights; the night1 Our race so long has groped through, since man fell From his imagined Eden of delight, ' ' Must, will, ere long, retire from Tr...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

66 Thk Indian Advocath. r ,ns2s:: Chabter on Indian Education. jp"""i i i a ::t it Written bv a Missionary, The Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Mr. Jones, has pub lished his annual report. We do not care to enter into a dis cussion of his utterances. Such reports have been and are colored. Nevertheless we call the attention of our readers to a few points which are not at all mentioned in the Commis sioner's report, viz: i. Since the time when President Harrison appointed Gen. Morgan Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Catholic em ployees were gradually dismissed from the Indian service of the Government schools and only a few were retained. Thus the Protestants had it all their own way. 2. There were preachers galore in the Indian service. There were preacher-commissioners, preacher-superintendents, preacher-inspectors, preacher-teachers, preachers every where hovering around the Indian schools. 3. Preachers were sent to inspect and find fault in the Catholic Indian schools They reporte...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Tun Indian Advocate. 67 the Government. Protestant prayers, hymns and bibles were taught. Preachers were given the use of such schools in en tirely Catholic reservations in order to turn the minds of the Indians from Catholicity to Protestantism. 5. Since the time of Gen. Morgan, a clause was put into the contracts entered into between the Government and the Catholic Indian schools, prohibiting the Catholic schools to receive any pupil that had been in a Government school the previous year. However, the Government employes would receive pupils from Catholic schools whenever they could get them. , , 6. Preachers, so-called missionaries, were encouraged by the non-sectarian officials to enter into Catholic districts in order to prpsyletize among Catholic Indians; such preachers were quasi-reporters on Indian questions, and found such a willing ear at Washington that the Indian Commissioner found it necessary at times to investigate their charges by sending special inspectors.. To turn...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

68 Thk Indian Advocate. order1 to inveigle the old Indians to send their offspring to the Government schools. Preachers who pretend to be in the service of God advised Catholic Indians tov send their chil dren to schools where no religion (or perhaps Protestantism) was taught. 9. The transportation of pupils required an enormous sum paid' by the Government. These moneys and the sala ried preachers enabled our enemies to keep up the agitation against the Catholic contract schools until they were de prived of the moderate support formerly given. Thus the Indian service of the Government, if not intentionally, yet actually interfered with religion among the Indians. 10. We have told only part of the machinery brought into operation for the Government schools and for Protest antism. ' And now here is the result as given by Mr. Jones: "For about a generation the Government has been taking a very active interest in the welfare of the Indian. In that time he has been located on reservation...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The Indian Advocate. 69 any nearer the goal of independence than he was thirty years ago, and if the present policy is continued he will get little, if any, nearer in thirty years to come." Horace writes: "Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.' (The mountains were in labors and a ridiculous mouse was born. ) The Commissioner states that $240,000,000 were paid to the Indians during the last thirty years. How much of this amount went into the pockets of the white people, of boodlers, swindlers, political wire pullers and so forth, and how much found its way into the pockets of the Indians? These lines are not written for the purpose of fault-finding. However, let the officials of a free and non-sectarian Govern ment be sincere and truly consequent. Let them either abstain from teaching religion entirely and see to it that no Protest ant preachers use their sacred trust to pervert Catholic In dians, or if the Government service must interfere with relig ion, then allow a certain s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

7o Thk Indian Advocati:. ijr j To Uplift the Indians. jj fc The Indians are at last to be quickly civilized by the In terior Department. Hitchcock, Jones & Co. have found new ways to turn savages into dudes. They no longer put their trust in religious, educational and industrial training. No; they have their own methods. A circular has just been sent out by the Commissioner to the Indian agents which indicates . the new forces of civilization. It says: "The wearing of long hair by the male population of your agency is not in keeping with the advancement they are making and are expected to make in civilization. The wear ying of short hair by the males will greatly hasten 'their pro gress toward civilization. You are therefore directed to induce your male Indians to cut their hair. With some of the Indians this will be an easy matter; with others it will require considerable tact and perseverance on the part of yourself and your employes to successfully carry out these instruction...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

, Thk Indian Advocatk. 71 firmness and withdrawal of supplies the agent can induce all to comply with this order." Next, painting the face must be given up. The circular declares: "On many of the reservations the Indians of both ( sexes paint, claiming that it keeps the skin warm in winter and cool in summer; but instead this paint melts when the Indian perspires and runs down into the eyes. The use of this paint leads to many diseases of the eyes among those Indians who paint. Persons who have given considerable thought and investigation to the subject are satisfied that this custom causes many cases of blindness among the Indians of the United States." Then the Indian blanket must go. The circular says: "The wearing of citizens' clothing instead of the Indian blanket and costume should be encouraged." The encour agement will probably be given, as in the case of the. cutting of the hair, by imprisonment in the guardhouse, the stoppage of food and the enforcement of hard labor. Fina...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

72 Tin: Indian Advocatr. - 4H 2 St. Joseph. 3 : "The Holy Ghost says that a virtuous woman will fall to the lot of the man who is full of the fear of God, and that the Lord will give her to him in reward of his good works." What, then, must have been the sanctity, the perfection of St. Joseph to merit that God should bestow on him the most virtuous, the most holy, the most perfect of women! We read in Genesis that God made Adam a wife like unto him self; may we not likewise say that He gave to Mary a husband who, by his virtue, his piety, his noble and holy qualities, bore her a marked resemblance? Mary was the holiest of women, and Joseph the most perfect of men. If God the Father was pleased to entrust to the care of St. Joseph His well-beloved Son, His "alter ego;" if He chose St. Joseph to represent Him as father to the Man-God, to provide for all His tem poral needs and to direct Him just as a father does his son, receiving from Him obedience, respect and love just as from an o...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The Indian Advocate. 73 confidence is in him, the more numerous and earnest will be our supplications; the more we importune him with our de mands, the more we shall please God, the more we shall gladden the Heart of Jesus; the more we render glory and honor to the Three Divine Persons, the better will they be disposed in our favor. Can it be otherwise, since Jesus made Himself the hum . hie servant of Joseph? "And He was subject to them." " Can His feelings in heaven be in any way different to those He had on earth? Could the land of glory, the .kingdom of truth, have destroyed or modified the sentiments of Jesus to- ward His foster-father? In a word, would He be less the son of Joseph in heaven than He was on earth when Our Blessed Lady addressed these words to Him in the language of a mother, "Your father and I have sought you?" The Heart , of Jesus has always been an infinitely perfect heart and can not change. What it is to-day it has always been, and what it was before, it is ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

74 Thk Indian Advocate. course to St. Joseph; he will obtain them for you. Do you desire to obtain any favor from Heaven? Place your demand in the hands of St. Joseph, and it is sure to be granted. Are you groaning under the slavery of sin, held down by habits of long-standing which enchain you to wickedness and subject you to the power of the evil one? Then hasten to Joseph, implore his patronage, and he will break your fetters; he will withdraw you from your deplorable state; at his bidding, joy and happiness will once more fill your soul: he will bring about your conversion and your return to the practice of vir tue and peace will once more reign in your conscience. The priest, more than any one else, needs this peace; his functions furnish him with so many traits of resemblance to St. Joseph. Every day, like him, he lives with Jesus. His house is the house of Jesus, since he is a priest to offer up the Divine Victim at the altar; he is the mediator between the people and Jesus, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Tun Indian Advocate. 75 be their age and condition what it may; he is also the patron 1 of a happy death. The most important moment of our ex istence is that which witnesses our passage from time to eter nity, and which consequently decides our eternal destiny. It is for us the greatest, the most important affair, and demands all our attention. To secure its happy issue we have nothing better to do than to place ourselves under the patronage of St. Joseph. He will obtain for us from Jesus the inestimable $ favor of breathing forth our last sigh in a state of sanctifying grace and of dying in the arms of Jesus and Mary as he him self had the happiness of doing. How beautiful and happy was the death of St. Joseph! He had Jesus and Mary to as sist: him in his last moments and to prepare him to pass from this world to the next. What more could he desire! What holy words were addressed to him by the one and the other! (A How consoling it is to have Jesus and Mary at one's death bed! We a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

76 Thk Indian Auvocatk. ..--.. -- Letter of Approval. I His Eminence Cardinal Martinelli commends the work of the Society for the Preservation of the Faith among Indian Children, as appears from the subjoined letter: Ai'ostoi.ic Delegation, Washington, D. C, February 4, 1902. Rev. Wm. H. Kktciiam, Director Bureau Catholic Indian Missions, Washington, D. C: AVv. Dear Sir I am grateful for the information you have given me concerning the nature and work of the Society for the Preservation of the Faith among Indian Children. I do not see how such a work can fail to enlist the zealous co-operation of the clergy and religious institutions of the country and the charitable aid of the faithful. It is the proud boast of this nation that the Indians are its wards, and that it feels itself responsible for their care and protection. But, owing to the lack of religious profession which is universal among the people, the country finds itself utterly unable to fulfill the first of all the duties ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

The Indian Advocate, 77 -- T St. Patrick's Day. r $? When dear St. Patrick's Day comes round, We wear a little green; A little sprig of shamrock, too, In every cap is seen. And every little boy and girl Knows well the story old, , Of how St. Patrick, when a boy, Was stolen off and sold Sold as a slave in Ireland, That green isle o'er the sea; So lovely with its lakes and vales, But very sad was he. He fed the swine, and did his work, Poor lonely little'boy! And night and morning said his prayers, That was his only joy. But sad was he, because not one In all that land so fair, Had ever heard of God or heaven, Or how to say a prayer. His little heart with pity ached, At night when all was still, To see the people worshiping A bon-fire on the hill. And afterwards, when free again, In dreams he used to see The Irish children reaching out Their hands beseechingly. "Come back! come back!" they seemed to cry, ' 'And teach us how to pray " And in his dreams he promised them, "I will come ba...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

78 Tun1 Indian Advocati: f -- - . X Glimpse of the Past. 4 il One of the Tragedies that Waited on ti I H Pioneer Days. j One autumn afternoon more than two hundred years ago an Indian hurried through the dense forest which spread over the hills along the west bank of the Hudson. He was tall and straight and very red. His face was painted; there were bright feathers in his hair, and he carried the weaponstof a warrior, all of which would have told a pioneer that trouble was brewing. His nam'e was Naoman, and he was one of the chiefs of the Waornecks, or some such tribe. Noiselessly he lowered himself down the sicle of a gulch, at the bottom of which ran a noisy creek. He followed a dim path -along the bank of the creek, and his face was turned toward the Hudson. Presently he came to a clearing in the center of which was a log cabin occupied by one Tracy, a pioneer, who had come there soon after Patrick McGregory, the first settler in Orange county, of which the chief town to-day is. ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Tun Indian Advocate. 79 Naoman sat down on the floor with his back against the logs which formed the wall, The children played with the beads which hung in a long string around, his neck. "Are you hungry?"' askecl the good housewife. Many times she had fed the chief when game was scarce1 and his own people starving. In a thousand "ways she had been kind to him, and he had shown appreciation in many WaysV "Naoman not hungry," he muttered, finally. "Naoman will tell you something. First you promise that you will tell no one, not even your husband. It is a secret of the tribe, and no Waorneck has ever betrayed his people before. The woman, all attention, came near, to him and prom ised to keep the secret as she would her life. "To-morrow at sunset the Indians will come to kill-you all," was the startling information which fell from, his lips. "They will burn down the house, kill 'the children before your eyes, torture your husband and carry you -away with them. Naoman has spoken, andno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

80 The Indian Advocate. "I have nothing to say," she replied, and then set her teeth to witness the execution of her loved ones. Then spoke Naoman, the Indian: "This woman is as true as the gold .that glitters in the sun. She knows who be- J trayed us, but because of her promise she will not tell. I will speak. I, Naoman, chief of the Waornecks, told this woman that we were coming to kill them. Let the woman go and do with me as you will." They did with Naoman without delay. No Waorneck could betray the tribe and live. He died as an Indian should, and the worst torture they could devise did not move a mus cle in his face. The family of Tracy was wiped out the same night. So the chief's sacrifice availed nothing. This is the story which has been handed down from gen eration to generation of the people who live in the pretty city of Newburg. The creek is about six miles down the river, but so potent is the legend that there are few who have not visited the scene of the Indian crime. F...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Tiik Indian Advocate. Si . I IItHE INDIAN ADVOCATE J Z pf ! X Published by the Benedictine Fathers of ....... SACRED HEABT MISSION. OKXiAHOMA. t ? ?:.. A Monthly Review Un ler the Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary, St. Michae and St. Benedict. A'iprmecl by Rt. Rev. 'L'heo. Mcerschaert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Indian Territories. TRHMH P HtTllNCKIPTIOTCl Single Copies 15c. Annual ;. . . .Si. 00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, each. . 75c. Foreign c $125- Kntcrcd as Second-class Matter at Sacred Heart, Oklahoma. PHIVIT.BGKSl 1. Ktery Subscriber and Bcnefai tor will participate :n all the merits, pracrs and good works of the Religious of S.icred Heart Abbcj. a. A solemn High Mass is sunn eery First Friday of the month in Honor of the Stirred Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. .5. A Com cnttial Mass is offered eery First Saturday of thr month for our departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. 4. F.ery jcar, in the month...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

82 The Indian Advocate. Envy shoots at others and wounds himself. "Thev are not our best friends who praise us to our faces. No one ever did, nor ever can do any one an injury vith outdoing a greater injury to himself. He that cannot forgive others breaks the bridge over which he must pass himself, for every man has need to be forgiven. Ceeeuritn is a gaudy costume which the crowd puts on a man in order that it may fire at him with greater certainty of hitting him. He who thinks he can find within himself the means of ,doing without others is much mistaken, but he who thinks that others cannot do without him is still more mistaken. ( It is proper for all to remember that they ought not to raise expectations which it is not in their power to satisfy, and that it is more pleasing to see smoke brightening into flame, than flame sinking into smoke. . '" Education is to the mind what cleanliness is to the body. The beauties of the one, as well as the other, are blemished, if not totally ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

Thk Indian Advocate. 83 Nevkr wait for a thing to turn up. Go and turn it up v yourself. Intakes less time, and it is surer to be done. ' ' Ok all the crimes that ever disgraced society, 'that of swearing admits of the least palliation. No possible benefit can be" derived from it, and nothing but perverseness and de pravity of human nature would ever have suggested it, yet such is its prevalence that by many it is mistaken for a fash ionable acquirement, and considered, by unreflecting persons, as indicative of enesgy and 'decision of character. Thkrk are three things offwhich human beings consist, the " son, the Wand the body; the inmost is the soul, themedi ate is the mind and the ultimate the body. The first is that . which receives life from Him. who is life itself; the second is the sphere of the activities of , that life, and the third is the rnedium through whichthose activities are manifested. 3ut it should be rememberd.,that there is, as, the Apostle, says, "a natural body ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 March 1902

84 The Indian Advocate. The holy season of Lent is more particularly adapted than any other to serious reflections, to penance and prayer, and especially to works of mercy and Christian charity. En tering into the spirit of Lent, devout Christians naturally turn their thoughts to those gone before us, who suffer lov ingly, but long for their eternal deliverance most eagerly. It is the holy season, when all the suffrages of the year, still further augmented by pious Christians, bear fruit a thousand fold; when the blessed gifts of prayer, alms, mortification and indulgences thrice multiplied fall like drops of grateful dew upon those who cry incessantly, "Have pity on me at least you my friends," and do not call in vain. We can almost picture them taking their upward flight, wafting thanks and benediction from their joyous pinions as they go. There are few among the cohorts of the church militant who do not welcome this acceptable time, these days of largess to the church suffering, ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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