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Title: Charleville Courier, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 997 items from Charleville Courier, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LAND COURT. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

LAND COURT. On Monday a Court was held before Mr. Starcke, Land Commissioner, when the following business was disposed of: Charles Meredith, application for cer tificate of fulfilment of conditions on agricultural farm No. 89, portion 6v, Morren, 1170 acres; conditionally granted. Alfred C. Shirley, application for cer tificate of fulfilment of conditions on grafting farm No. 160, portion 9v, Oak wood, 3845 acres; conditionally granted N. J. W. Neilsen, H. M. Hood, M. M. Hoid, J. A. B. Hood, and R. Hood application to be allowed to take advan tage of section 3 of the Grazing Home stead Act on portions 14, 39, 40, 41, and 42v, Bnrenda; referred to Land Board. Some Victorian bntter which had been stored in London for ten months has been examined by an analyist and found to be unchanged in condition.

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Too Well Preserved. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Too Well Prcmnl | -Bidding for compliments is well known I to lie a dangerous business, - but jjcople still rnsh into It as - motlis fly into tlie candle. "Why, Susan Jane," exclaimed Mrs. Jennings to the daughter of an ol«l neigh bour ; " here it is goin" on tliutteen yea re since I see you last! , But there! I should 'a* knowed you anywhere !" [ "You.think I've kept my looks pretty I well, then, Mrs. Jennings said plain 'little Mrs. B--, with an air of gratified vanity. 1 " Yes, Susan Jane," responded Mrs. 1 Jennings, in evident unconsciousness of what was expected of her ; " I'm sure I .don't want to hurt yonr feelin's in any way. anr yon know ' handsome Is that handsome does but I innst say I think' you have kex>' your old looks sur prisin'ly."

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Hands. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

The Hands. Hands disfigured by housework and constant soaking: In water can be clean ed by the use of a lemon cut in half and kept In the soap dish, or a tea spoonful of ammonia in the . bath water. Cold cream" rubbed well; into the' hands will improve their appearance. After the cream use hot water and soap.

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Removing Stains. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Kemoving Stains. Ink spots on furniture can 'be re moved by touching: them with a feather wet in a teaspoonfui of water to which six or eight drops of nitre have been added. As soon as the stain disappears rub the place with a cloth dipped in cold water. Two parts of unboiled linseed oil and one part of. turpentine will cause the disappearance of white spots produced by hot water or anything similar. It is an excellent freshener for oiled or varnished furniture of any kind. Spirits of camphor will do the same. Whenever such articles have been neglected and are filled with dust, unless they are made of mahogany or rosewood, wash them thoroughly in warm soapsuds (not hot) to remove all .extraneous matter. The bent part of a hairpin, encased in a soft rag, which alone must be used, will remove all accumulations from carved portions and cavities. Then apply the turpen tine and oil, and the article will be re juvenated. A less severe method of cleansing varnished wood is to add to the mi...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
To Clean Carpets. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

To Clean Carpets. When a carpet becomes a little dingy, it. may be considerably improved by sweeping it with a broom damped with water to which a little ammonia has been added. The water should be put in a pail, the broom dipped into it, and the drops of water shaken off. WJien the broom becomes dry it must be damped again, and the water changed when it becomes dirty. If an old Brus sels carpet is very much soiled, it should be thoroughly beaten, and spread out on the floor. Then washed with warm water and fresh ox gall, in the proportion of one pint of gall to one gallon of water. Wash a small piece at a time, rinse with clean water, and wipe as dry as possible. The windows of the room should be left open, so that the carpet will dry quickly, and if it has been properly rinsed, the col ours will look almost as bright as new.

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Household Hints. Washing Childrea's Faces. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Household Hints* . Washing Childrea's Faces. Care Should always be observed in washing children's faces not to let the soap get in the eyes, -which may cause much injury. It is cruel to allow the face and eyes to be washed over with soap in the coarse and rough way in which it is often done. Even to an adult soap in the eyes Is a very painful ordeal to so through, and in the end it produces chronic, sometimes acute, ophthalmia. Children, at any rate, should be spared this barbarity, and the eyes, at least, carefully avoided. In washing children's faces with soap a fine flannel, should be used ; it is not a good plan to apply the soap with a sponge or the corner of a towel, as many do.

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
WOOL MADE FROM IRON [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

WOOL MADE FKOM- IRON. 1 i STRANGE as it may seem, there comes from the iron furnaces a substance so white and light, so fluffy and flaky, that it looks and feels like picked wool. It is called " slag-wool," and this is how it is made, and for what it is used. Slag fs a waste substance which issues from iron malting furnaces. It is formed by the separation of the earthy matter from the ore, and looks like coarse, dark glass, if allowed to cool as it comes from the fire. Formerly it was thrown away as value less, bnt since a process for converting it into "wool" has been discovered, it is utilised for many purposes. This mineral wool is formed by causing a jet of steam to play upon the stream of molten slag as it issues from the furnace, which has the effect of breaking np the melted mass into countless small, bead like particles, so light that they fly in every direction. Each of these tiny beads carries behind it a delicato thread of finely-spun slag, so that one is reminded of a co...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
[?] Bad Preparation. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

h; "-7:'Y; Jk- I L At glimpse of- Itnabiri's whimsicaliiyl Is-. .to be fouuit-Ui lii$ fi-ie?wJ!s rei.'liliiiscfeut'thji: I " One rijorulnir." litf notes, " as ffo ivere cumins ont of t-hf <-1i:ij»p! iie wifrt to as : . I onjrht not to have «oine to etiapel tbis. momiM#.! ? We .asfcod Uitii, in some as-: . touisliliiciit, why: He si'.id :: ' I am gomx to wire ;i critique Ml })ieture ill the academy. ami I want to be in a per fectly diabolical temper.'"

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
A DREAM OF ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

DREAM OF ENGLAND. HERE, where the fig and vine bask hand in hand, And the hot lizard lies along the wall, Blinded I shrink where cypress shadows fall, And' gaze upon the far-off mountains bland ; Or down the dusty track Lorenzo planned Watch the slow oxen oscillating crawl Sleek in the sultry glare, and feel witha! Half alien still in a familiar land. But when from out the stone-pine elopes that rise . [n the clear ether, back against the blue, The cuckoo suddenly calls, I close mine eyes [n visionary rapture, think of yon, Hear the home-music of your moister tkies, i.nd dream that I am drenched with English dew. -Alfred Austin in The World-Carcggi, ipnl, 1303. The new observatory now beinpj erected at Mont Blanc will be supported on what are termed ten screws, by means of which tho building will bo brought buck to its normal condition f-lioul'J the tno\ omenta of the glacier displace it. The roof of i.he observatory is to form a lei race with parapet .suppoi f.in^r tlic cupola whic...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Ralfour's His. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Ralfnnr'* II 1«. . ! A story is told of Mr., Balfour's recent golf-starring tour. He had; made an iron shot in which he- had' sent tlie t>oll almost half asfar as the ball. "What . did I hit V" he asked" life caddie, as: he looked around to ~ discover a Iiidfteii bowlder or si decapitated sturiip.' , The ' only reply was about ascrushinsjascould . have beeu compressed into a .single ; word : " Scotland."

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
HOW GHOSTS ARE MADE. A CHAT WITH AN ITINERAVI ILLUSIONIST. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

HOW GHOSTS ARE MABS. A CHAT WITH AX ITINERAVI ILLUSIONIST. I MET the ghost-ranker at a country fair. In a field set apart for the village *' feast * were roundabouts, shootinggalleritis. cocoa nut shies, and tho many and wonderful things which make up a rustic saturnalia Arranged in a semi-circle were booths in which, for a fow pence, the villagers were able to see the biggest woman on earth, the only living mermaid, the wonderful twins, and a bewildering army of ghosts from the spectre of Hamlet's father to the phantom which haunted-old Scrooge. I mounted the steps leading to the ghost show and saw a fat man sitting in the pay box ..smoking a pipe with meditative deliberation. There was nothing spectral or uncanny abont him. Ho was a happy, jolly, good tempered fellow, with a supreme contempt for the spirits which he charmed from the vasty deep. By his side was his buxom wife, a woman of massive figure, who, in the days of youth and beauty, had played Ophelia in half the barns of E...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Watch to Measure Distance. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Ifnicli to !?Kra*are DNfance. ? A watch lias been invented which ; measures distaifce by sound: Tlie In- . ventor, .a French officer- named TliouVe: nin, has called the instrument a yhpno telemetre. To operate it a little'button is pressed at tlie instant of the flash and i again at the sonntL In the meantime 1 a', needle traverses a dial, registering tiine to the one-tchth part' of a second. The rest is a mere matter of calcula- \ tion. - .

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
WHEN DOES A GIRL KNOW HER OWN MIND? [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

WHEN DOES A GIRL KNOW HER OWN MIND? DOESN'T she always know it ? Nob by any manner of means. Ask the Edibress of Foryet-AIe-N'ot, and Aunb Marjorie if she does. They are both inundated with letters from girls which ran somewhat after this fashion: "I've two lovers, and I can't make up my mind which of them to take. Do help me to decide." Or " There's a man who is dreadfully in lore with me, but I can't decide whether I want to marry bim or not. Sometimes I think I do, and then, again, I'm sure I don't." Ask any woman who possesses that delightful gift of sympathy that needs must win her the love and the confidence of all her girl friends-what does she have con stantly poured into her ear ? " Do help me to keep out of Mr. Tomkin's way ; I'm perfectly certain he wants to propose, and I haven't the least idea what I ehall say. I don't know whether I really care for him, or whether I don't." Ask any girl who has had half a dozen offers, and she will confess to you that there were at lea...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
A Ro[?]and for an Oliver. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

A Ro'nnd forna 031 rrr. ? On a crowded car a, yonng' .woman ! arose upon the entrance of an elderly one. and, with a wave of the hand to wards the seat, which the newcomer seemed reluctant to accept, said : " Ape before beauty." " Thank yotiT" was the reply, as tliii n'e\vcdmer dropped into the seat, " but.oiie would need'glasses to see the beauty." " Perhaps," was rejoined quietly, " but none would be required to j see tlie age."

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
MYTHS REGARDING CROWS. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

MYTHS REGARDING CROWS. IN folk-lore the crow always appears as a bird of the most sinister character, repre senting either death, or night, or winter. The Hindoos believe, on the other band, that to eat a crow will prolong life by keep ing the hair black and preventing it turning grey. In German Switzerland, it is believed that a crow perching on the roof of a honse in which lies a corpse, is a sign that the soni of the dead is irrevocably lost. In Sussex, its cry thrice repeated i« considered a sure token of death. The Somalia, who inhabit the shores of the Red Sea, wage deadly warfare against the crow, which, they affirm, was created white, but which in an evil hour betrayed the hiding-place of the Prophet by an untimely croak. For this offence he cursed the bird of ill-omen, and it became black, since which time it has shared the fate of all creatures when down in theirluck, and has been mercilessly hooted aud peeked at and destroyed. Thero are, perhaps, few who have not heard of...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Items of Interest. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Stems of interest. The consumption of tea in Englandduring 1892reached the highest point ever touched since its use lias been generally diffused amooft the masses, the total quantity used being 207,000,0001b. Paper quilts are becoming popular in Europe. They are cheap and warm and composed of sheets of perforated white paper sewn together. An untamed swallow which had its nest, in a farm nearRoubaix was lately caught and taken in a cagp to Paris, where it was released. It returned to its nest in ninety minutes, having accomplished a distance of 250 kilomdtres, or over two miles a minute. Dr. Scoresby calculated the velocity of the average wave in a storm at 2,873 fees in each minute or 3,267 English statute miles in an hour.' Electric liners in the Atlantic are the next thing we shall, hca* ' of. Messrs Harland and Wolff, the Belfast shipbrokers, think the limit of steam has been reached, but they are looking forward to great things from electricity. On a recent day no fewer than 6,...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
The Finishing Touth. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

The FlnUfcioz Toofb. " I have finished the article yon told nie to write, urging ' tliat scheme of yonrs, sir," said the assistant to the editor. "Have you put in all the arguments in its favour that you can think of ?" " Yes. sir." "Then add that 'other considerations will readily snggest themselves to the tliouchtful reader.* and let it go."

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
They Paid. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Th 7 Paid. In .a street car the other day a pretty young lady appeared to be in great dis tress. Her face was flushed, and one hand clutched the corner of her cape, while the other was moving restlessly up and down the inside. When the ex citement had readied the highest point, and all eyes were on her, she suddenly drew forth a knife and pointed it toward herself. It flashed upon the horrified passengers that she was going to stab herself, and four or Ave gentlemen sprang toward her. The one behind her grabbed her arm, and another one caught lier hand. Her excitement imme diately vanished, and her face broke into ripples of laughter as she said : "If you won't let me do it one of you must pay my fare or cut my cape so I can get my purse ; it has slipped into the lining." When the conductor came for ward flve very sheepish gentlemen each offered him a. nickel for the young lady. -" New York Tribuue."

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Among the Frcaks. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Anions Hie Frcnlts. The Armless Wonder was resting . It's head on the cold slab of a marble mantel just before the show opened, when thf Fat Woman came in and took her place. " Hello, Army," she said in that strangely familiar way these people have. " what is the matter ?" " I was out with the boys last night, and oh, my head !" groaned the Wonder. " Yon deserve to suffer," she said harshly, "and I have no sympathy for' you." ' . " That's all right," retorted the Won der, " I have one thing to be thankful for." . What's'that ?" " That I'm not the two-headed freak from Seringapatam," and the Wonder felt so grateful that he actually smiled at the Fat-Woman.

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
Russian Toffee. [Newspaper Article] — The Charleville Courier — 6 June 1896

Russian Toffee. For this good dessert sweet put a break fast cupful of thick cream (if sour, so much the better) into a saucepan with the same amount of sifted siugar, and boil it slowly over a clear but not too hot fire till it first becomes perfectly liquid and then begins to thicken again : now add to it a dessertspoonful essence of vanilla and the same of whisky ; when the mixture becomes very frothy and leaves the sides of the pan it should be poured at once on to a flat buttered dish. It should set almost immediately. Cut >t Into squares before it is quite hard. It should eat short, but neither crisp nor crumbly, its success depending on its being lifted off the fire at exactly the right moment, and that only practice will teach. Another form of Russian toffee is made in the ordinary, way, only using thick sour cream instead of butter, and flavouring it with lemon juice. Another form is made with the crfram and clear honey instead of the sugar. Either way it is very nice, b...

Publication Title: Charleville Courier, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Qld, Australia
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