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Title: Snowy River Mail Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 14,051 items from Snowy River Mail, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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PIGS AS BAROMETRS. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

PIGS AS BAROMETRS. Probably tli last tLing that one would oxpcot to indicate changes in the weather is a pig's tail. However, accol?ding to the skipperl of a Nor wegian sailing ship, who usually has a porker or two on board, one could scarcely have a more reliable barom eter Whlen a weather disturbance is coming ,on, the tails of the pigs, usually kinky, straighten out and their ears droop. With the barometer reading between 2i}.90 and 30 the tails begin to forecast approach of a" trough of low pressure. When the readiug gets below 29.50 the pigs seek cover, and the storm is pretty sure to burst within five hours. But a high baro meter puts a beautiful twist in the tails, and the ears stand jauntily.stiff and with a trifle of a cant forward.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

Regularity of the Bowels. THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENCE AGAINST ILL-HEALTH. When the bowels are clogged the waste matter decays and ferments and enters the Blood, and is carried to .11 parts of tho boly, producing Head aches, Biliousness, Sleeplessness. Heartburn; Loss of Appetite, Indiges. tion, Neuralgia, Rheumatism, and various other ailncnts disturbing the Heart and Nervous Systaon; and if continued is :liable to cause inflamma. tion of the Bowels, Liver, and Kid neys. To maintain a healthy system tht bowels should operate at least once every 24 hours. This is one of Na. ture's wise provisions which is tok often ignored, and the result is untold suffering. Women and cl.ildren art the greatest offenders, but why such should be the, case is a problem to b< so61ved. .Having read abcut Dr. Morse's In: dian Root Pills," writes Mr. Johr Enchrs, Storekeeper, or Ea.t Bour bon Street, Bundaberg, Q'ld, "and be ing a sufferer for three years fron' Rheumatism and Constipation, in fac...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ELECTRIC STERILISATION. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

ELECTRIC STERILISATION. The importance nowadays attached - after age-long neglect-to securing milk in a condition as nearly as pos sible free from disease germs of every kind gives specoial interest to a mode of electrio sterilisation invented by ;a Liverpool doctor. Hitherto the mode pursued to preserve milk in full fresh ness of condition for the considerable length of time necessary for its distri bution and consumption has been to heat the liquid to a temperature which kills the microbes, and then to prevent the access of further microbes by se curing it in anh-tight bottles, after which the freshness seems to bd pre served indefinitely. An objection to the method is that the heating of the milk is in effeot a cooking process, which so far changes the nature of the constituents as to render them loss readily nutritious. Dr. J. M. Beat tie, of Liverpool, however, sterilises the milk by electric current, and thus avoids heating it at all.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ORBOST ATHLETIC SPORTS [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

ORBOST ATHLETIC SPORTS The committee of the above found it would be desirable to extend the date for receiving entries for the handicap events until this evening. The follow ing have been received up to date: NOVICE RACE. O. Andrews, Orbost A. W. W. Maddern, Orbost M. Johnston, Orbost J. W. Gargan, Orbost A. B-ucher, Orbost P. B. Irvine, Orbost T. J. McGahan, Glenaroua SHEFFIELD HANDICAP. E. G. Redenbach, Tambo Upper O. Andrews. Orbost B. O'Sullivan, Seymour J. Pugh, Harris J. H. Nixon, Orbost A. L. Pinch. Orbost H. W. Hayes, Lake Tyers J. Godfrey, Bendigo HURDLES, 130yds, E. G. Redenback, Tambo Upper B. O'Sullivan, Seymour J. Pugh, Harr:s J. H. Nixon, Orbost H. Thorpe, Lake Tyers A. L. Pinch, Orbost P. B. Irvine, Orbost T. J. McGahan, Glenarous 440yds. R4cq. E. G. Redenbach, Tambo Upper A. W. W. Maddern, Orbost B, O'Sullivan, Seymour J. Pugh, Harris J. H. Nixon, Orbost H. Thorp.!, Lake Tyers A. L. Pinch, Orbost J. Godfrey, Bendigo SPRINT, 75yds, E. G. Redenbach, Tambo Upper Q. Andr...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IMPERIAL POLITICS. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

IMPERIAL POLITICS. IN the event of the Asquith Go vernment remaining in office for any extended period there will be a ;tremnendoti irevolution in the natonal policy of he -.eUnited Kingdom'.I To' b'egin with,; it 'is clearly . t ihe :inttentioi'- of the Cabinet to'p roceed. with am easure conferring Ho6me Ruleonfi Ireland. This hlas, so far,- beei blocked. by the Houfse of Lords, :but if the Government is;I determined, and has the .support of a majority of the people, a wvay..iill be found soonei :or later to::circumvent the Peers or compel them to come to teris': The .only question seems to be as to, whether or not the Go vernment .yill retain its majority until -such time as some means have been devised for surmount ing the obstacle. On the question of Home Rule one could under stand the demand for it if Ireland were being unfairly treated, as she certainly has been in the past, but so many liberal reforms, chiefly in regard to the land laws, have been made during the last 25 yea...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHAFFCUTTERS ON STRIKE. MELBOURNE, Thursday. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

CHAFFCUTTERS ON STRIKE. MELBOURNE, Thursday. Fifty chaffcutters have struck work at Winchelsea owing to the employers deciding to pay by piecework. The strikers demand the rates fixed by the Australian Workers' Union log. Under this the wages would range from 8s. to I2s. per day, including board and lodging.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LATEST TELEGRAMS THE LAZY STRIKE. Melbourne, Thursday. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

LATEST TELEGRAMS (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT) THE LAZY STRIKE. Melbourne, Thursday. The "lazy" strike at Sydney has collapsed, and the men have resumed work under the old conditions.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ENSILAGE—THE FAVORITE FODDER. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

ENSILAGE-THE FAVORITE FODDER.-I (By "Agriculturalist" in "New Zealand Dairyman.") That the feeding of cows is one ot the most important matters connected with dairying, no one can gainsay, bunt of the many foods in general use, I will at present touch on only ono--ensil age. No argument, to my mind, could be adduced against the use of ensilage, and any oontention. to justify the setting aside of fodder of such para mount importance would not hold ground in the face of practical experi ence on the dairy farm. .-Ensilage contains no substance that would in any way tend to interfere with the organa isms of the cow, while it oontains :o little acid that its color is not objec tionable. It can be made when hay cannot, and even this is an important point, espeoially in Southland and Tar anaki where the weather is so variable. It may not supersede hay-making, bl; that is probably because of the variety of uses which the colonial farmer puts hay to. Regarding the preparation ot ensilage, I ...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE MODERN MACHIAVELLI. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

THE MODERN MACHIAVELLI. "But why won't you buy something off my stall?" remarked the pretty girl at a charity bazaar. "Ohr," answered the man, C"I only buy from the plain girls. They have a liirder time making sales you know. It was a brilliant reply and served its author nobly all the afternoon.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHERRY WINE. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

CHERRY WINE. - A recipe for the manufacture of cherry wine, recommended by the viti cultural Expert of New. South Wales JIr M. Blunno, reads:-Remove the stalks of the cherries, and then make a pulp of the fruit without breaking the stones, working the pulp so as to free it entirely from the stones. The pulp should then be -passed through a sieve. To the pulp of every 251b ot fruit add 51b sugar, together with 5os cream of tartas? and pne gallon of water. Stir the whole and make a homogonous fluid. Place the vessel in a room where the temperature is from 65 to 70 deg. Fahr., and cover same with a cloth. After about 24 hours, the liquor will begin to ferment. When fermentation has subsided (which can be judged by the cessation of bubbling) the liquid should be separated' from tei pulp, and the former (which is now wine) is stored away in a cask and kept in a coolo place. The storage vessel should be kept filled, either by addin, moro' of the cherry 'wine or else good sound grape wine,...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BARBED WIRE CUTS. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

.; BARBED WIRE CUTS. l.?rm animals are always more ci less liable 'to injury from wire outs. ;andt it is important to give quick at -entioni to all such injiries. When lho nwound is severi it will pay to em. Iploy a veterinarian to dress the wound. Wl\here the services of a good vcterin ariaii cannot be obtained, farmers wil have to handle the case themselves. The ordinary wound will heal if not interfered with. This. interference miay: 'be from. germs, parasites, Vied. dhling with the wound, -on the part oe the man* or the animal itself. -The first thing to dlo is to stop the. himorr/ hlage. '.lhis can be aocomplir~hed by a tight bhand of clean, white muslin, applied either over or above the iound. . A thread imay be used ' ni der the artery by using a needl, anud tied; Do not use .flour, dilt,; coo wobsj or anything. of that sort on the wounrd. They are unnecessary.y and may =produco :a serious-infection of the wounil. :..Haiving ohecked the bleed iog, remove the clots of blood an...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CROSS-LEGGED HABIT. PERSONS WHO SIT CARELESSLY. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

CROSS-LEGGED HABIT. PERSONS WHO SIT CARELESSLY. Fully 80 per cent. of travellers by tramway car and omnibus sit cross legged. That is the opinion of a cor respondent who has taken particular notice of his fellow passengers. The cross-legged habit when you sit down is provocative of grave harm to die body. Indeed, in time, a Lon don doctor who told "The Daily Mir ror," it produces varicose veins if the person regularly adopts this and no other attitude. "The objection I see to the habit," lie said, "is that the return flow of blood from the leg is stopped at lhe knee, the result being that the veins in the log swell up. "All the weight is thrown upon onp side of the body, and the under leg 'goes to sleep' owing to the pres sure put on the sciatic nerve. The body should be equally balanced. "There' is another danger I ought to point out. If you sit cross-legged you become lop-sided. "Personally I never do this. I "always let the legs rest limply-stretch ed out is just as good. The mus...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SPECTRES THAT STOLE MONEY. SAVINGS CARRIED OFF. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

SPECTRES THAT STOLE MONEY. SAVINGS CARRIED OFF. The way in which a French fa::ily o farmers called on "spirits" to aid thorn in an attempt to avoid paying the rent is causing some amusement in Paris. Two brothers, named Guitton, occu pied, with their wives and children, a' small farm near Saint-AinandI: . One day they told thlir neighbors of in visible hands, whlch upset their flower pots and disarranged their gardens. Minme. Guitton, the younger, said, too, that by night she had seen through her window two black men-or demons- who walked up and down, oasting cur ses at the house. It was discovered on the next day that the family's whole savings had disappeared. Appeal was made to the priest and to the police. But neither the Latin. of the one nor tihe vigilance of the other (says the "Matin") could throw light upon the matter for the moment. Enqgiries were continued by the police and the "stolen" money was found under a staircase, where the brothers Guitton had hidden it.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
POTTING BUTTER. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

POTTING BUTTER." A practical correspondent, in-reply to an enquiry, thus describes the methods he has found successful:--"A vessel intended for keeping butter should be deep, with a mouth not exceedingly 10 inches in width. Butter made foi keeping should be churned from ripen. ed cream. The temperature on the day of churning should be as low as possible, and if water can be obtained at 50 deg. for washing, so much the better. After at least three wash ings, during which the butter is rooked gently to prevent its aggregation, it should be brined and subsequently placed in a trough to drain and dry. If a butter box is provided for cooling, so much the better, inasmuch as for keeping the butter should be quite firm before salting and working on the but ter worker. The salt should be ground almost as fine as flour, having first been thoroughly dried. It is then distributed on the butter, after the roller has been passed over it, at the rate of three-quarters of an ounce to the pound. So...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
MURDER TRIALS. STRIKING SIMILARITY IN CASES [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

MURDER TRIALS. STRIKING SIMILARITY IN CASES --In a letter to the London "Da:ly Chronicle," Mr. Herbert N. Fj'lewker, of Hucclecote, Gloucestershire, draws attention to the singular likeness be tween the case of Amy Evelyn Rowe, indicted before Mr. Justice Coleridge on her own confession at Gloucester Assizes recently for the murder of her mother in December, 1908, and acquit ,ted, and that of Constance Kent, cou leemned nearly fifty years ago for the Road Murder., Mr. Ftewker .writes: "The dramatic trial of Amy Rowc for the alleged murder of her mother contained many points' of interest, both in law and fact. "The case for the prosecution show-. ed there was no evidence wlhatever against the prisoner except her. own. confession to tlhe matron of the house at Cardiff, five years after her mother's death. "During the trial Mr. F. W. Sher wood, in his able defence on behalf of his client, raised an interesting legal point, and quoted the case of Con stance Kent, tried at Salisbury As s...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
REMARKABLE FRAUDS. A FAMILY CHARGED. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

REMARKABLE FRAUDS. A FAMILY CHARGED. IRemarkablo evidenca was given at Bournemouth (England) recently whei7 Iertie Way, a retired butcher, and hisi wife and daughter, Elizabeth and Flo rence Louisa Way, were charged .with ob'laining £800 by false pretences from Mrs. Annie Maria Wheeler and an ther. Mrs. S. Pearce, for the Treasury, a;id Miss Way first obtained 30/ frdni Mirs. Wheeler for examination fees in •January, 1911. This was followed by ather small advances. Afterwards she showed Mrs. Wheeler two letters purporting to come from London firms. one of which informed her that she had won a £50 prize for her march, "Hibernia," and the other that she was entitled to a £300 prize. Another document purported to be the report of a musical syndicate, and stated that Miss Way was entitled to six and a quarter millions of money. In all £808 was advanced by Mrs. Wheeler, partly in banknotes, with some of which, said counsel, Way had paid the rent of a more expensive house and bought furni...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IMPORTANCE OF REGULARITY IN MILKING. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

IMVPORTANCE OF REGULARITY IN MILKING. Tn everyotling ;reguliafity is good piao ice, bu' in good daiiying it is im peritive. To produce large and 'icli yields of milk .is the sole function oat thle dairy cow, and to do this she must be of good dairy type, fed palatable aid nutritious feeds and milked clean i?t regular porio'ds. . :Asoe a rule, the cow is. milked at a o'clok :of mornings- in summer and 7 or 8 'o'clock in mornings in the ivin ter..Tho very unequal periods are made for-the cow by this sun to suio milk iang; and as a consequence, the quality of her milk flow and the length of her annual period are reduced. The Low can do her best only when milked at equal and regular periods of about 12 hours each the year round. The full supply of millkis not in the udder ready to be drawn out before milking time comes, but two thirds of it is produced in the glands during the operation of milking. The ud der, however, is usually filled, and thei cow 'becomes used d o this, but if the m...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A SWAMP SOIL. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

A SWAMP.SOIL -; Some owners of snvamp soil are puzz led by their' un'prductive 'characteri when first oultivated. They. reason, that soils hav'e been a made out of vegetation: and, therefore, should be able toi. produce plants luxuriantly. The truth generally is- that a :rawv swamp soil is in an inert condition? The air has .been' excluded, and acids have formed, and bacteria are not at wcrk. When the water has been. drawn off, tlid exposure of the soil to frost after " autumni ploughing and: ai summer of thorough tillage does mucli: to- mend .matters. A few. tons, of stable manure per acre introduce: the needed bacteiia. An application or lime sweetens the soil.: The nitro` gen .in the swsimp begins to gainl av ailability. Usually, there: is: great deficiency in potash, and :-heavy ap plicatiohs pay. . Phosphoric acid also; is neoded.. Tile first yeaar should be given to some 'bustling plant :like maize that can' heln itself to 'raw and coarso food, and. the tillage paves thec way ...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING HORSES. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

ADVANTAGES OF CLIPPING . HORSES. First.-The natural proccss of moiil ting or shedding the hair is a draft on the vitality of the animals. The ap petite is diminished, and with work or pleasure, horse exertion is irksome dur ing that period; Olipping or:' arti ficial removal .of the hair accomplishes min . very short space of time what Nature reequires 'much more time to do. In other words,. Natureo isan ticipated in her 'work, and the ani malPs system saved a call upon :it. SecotLd.-A . olipped :horse is less liable to: take cold thaam = long-coated horse, because th'e eva?poration of pers-. piration is more rapid. A "liot" horse iwill cool out minuch quicker. with a short coat. Every groom is a:iware of thisf fact Third ---A clipped horse requiresiless fuel (food) to mnaintain bodily heat thahn the long coated horse; therefore clip ping as ' matter of _economy should bl generally prictised - ]oiwith.-A? olipped :horse. l18iks more cleanly acts more sprightly, -and keeoops in better...

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. [Newspaper Article] — Snowy River Mail — 23 January 1914

IN A FRIENDLY SORT OF WAY. When a man ain't got a cent and he's feeling kind o' blue, And "che clouds hang dark and heavy and won't let the sunshine tlhrough, it's a great thing, 0 my brethren, for a fellow just to lay His hand upon your shoulder in a friendly sort o' way. It makes a man feel curious, it makes the teardrops start, An' you sort o' feels a flutter in the region of the heart; You can't look up and meet his eyes, you don't know what to say, When his hand is onl.your shoulder in a friendly sort o' way'. Oh, the world's a ouriou; compound. with its'honey and its gall, With its cares and b:tter crosses, but a good world after all; An' a good God must have made leastways that is what I say, When. a hand is on your shoulder in a friendly sort of way.

Publication Title: Snowy River Mail
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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