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Elephind.com contains 8,145 items from Grenville Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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II [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

II. "I knew those girls would forget something, mother." Marian Westlake raised her eyes from the book she had been reading, and smiled at her interrupter. "What is it, Dick?" "That letter Trixie promised to show Babs. Do you know where it is?" "How thoughtless of her! Yes; I fancy it is on the dining-room mantel piece." "Good. I expected to have to turn 'the house upside down to find it." "I hope that won't be necessary, my dear," Mrs. Westlake smilingly re turned, as her son left the drawing room. Entering the dining-room, Dick switched on the electric light, and, taking the letter from the mantel piece, was about to leave the room, when he fancied he saw the curtains in front of the French windows move slightly. "That window must be open," he muttered. "I had better shut it at once; it might be overlooked later." Seizing the curtain, he pulled it aside with a jerk. The next moment a rough hand had clutched his throat, and the, weight of a burly form was pressing him backwards. Ow...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A VAGABOND FATHER. I. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

A VAGABOND FATHER. !' By J. B. Fetherston. « P.C. X555 should never have joined , the force. He had not as yet recog nised his unsuitability for the duties, otherwise he might have made some attempt to overcome his habit of meditating on every subject but that of guarding the place when on his beat. As he stood now at the corner of the sparsely-lit suburban road, watching the clouds flit across the moonlit sky, not a hundred yards away, although it wanted a quarter to the witching hour, .the midnight collection was being made from a pil lar-box by a person who would have found it difficult to convince the po liceman, had he doubted it, that this unusually early clearance was duly authorised. The too-punctual collector had ap parently forgotten his keys, for, strangely enough, he,was withdrawing the packets through the aperture through which they had been posted. How he managed to do so P.C. X555 surmised later, when another collector put in an appearance, and called his attention to...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
III [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

III. Slinski sat upon the bed in his garret, and by his side lay Mrs. Wid ger's ultimatum. It was no ordinary ultimatum. It was not "pay up or go"—for it would have been easy to go. It was that Mrs. Widger desired his room, and | would not permit him to remove his \ luggage or musical instruments until j he had settled his account. His thoughts, harking back to that day, three years ago, when he had re ceived his dismissal from the town clerk, followed the struggle for a liv ing that had ensued from then till now! What a struggle it had been! How much greyer it had left him! The band had been, like its leader, on the veteran side when that dire blow fell, and yet, dim-eyed and halt and weary as they were, they had stuck to their playing for the sake of those dependent on them. During these three years Ivan Slinski had often thanked Heaven that he was a bachelor. i For the words he had meant to say | to Elinor Parish had never been spok- ] ; en. He had just remained her friend. 1 I T...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
II [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

II. It was iiot surprising that Ivan Slin ski hardly felt disposed to prolong the conversation just then, for it had been iii his mind lately to pay definite at tentions to Elinor Parish, a lodger, like himself, in the house of John Wid ger, an employe at the gasworks. He felt glad, now, that he had never ac tually made love to Elinor Parish, that he had just been courteous and kind, and attentive to her wants at table. He had not gone too far, and so no harm had been done. But the town clerk had spoken in time. He felt thankful for that. He would now set himself bravely to earn a living for his band and himself, and she would continue, as heretofore, to eke out a livelihood by doing odd jobs for the Bigbeach dressmakers. He could not help heaving a deep sigh of regret, for perhaps, just now, pity was his predominant feeling for Elinor Parish, who, nearing thirty, was a deli-1 cate woman whose weakness and soli tude made a strong appeal to a man of the Pole's chivalrous nature. Slin...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Where He Had To Be Careful. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Where He Had To Be Careful. A man attending a revival was pressed' hard to repent, and at. last got up. "Dear friends," lie said, "I feel the spirit moving me to talk and tell what a bad 'un I've been, but I can't do it, because I'm going up for trial next week." "Heaven will forgive you," shouted the preacher, encouraging. "I guess that's all right," said the penitent; "'but I've got to reckon with twelve blokes like you and me on the jury."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
V [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

. It was night. The cliffs bandstand was a blaze of vari-colored fairy lights, and round it swarmed holiday makers in their tens of thousands. They had been disappointed, at first, to see no soldiers' uniforms in the bandstant; for the military band on the cliffs had come to be the town's chief attraction. Nevertheless, they had to almit that the scratch band which tin. town authorities had raked up was jerforming wonderfully well, and that the music the old conductor chap hadchosen was just the sort for the occaiion. It is Irawing near ten, and the crowd is greater than ever. Now the band strides up "Hearts of Oak," now* "The Brtish Grenadiers," and each Is sung enthusiastically. But when the majetic strains of "Rule, Britan nia!" somd upon the August night it seems as'if every man, woman and child in tie great crowd is joining in the great old song; and when, finally, the Pole, with a last tap of his baton, brings hi:; men to their feet and the first bar; of the National Anthem cr...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
In Plain English. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

In Plain English. One of the "upper ten" who was visiting America accepted the hospi tality of a gentleman in New York. When taking farewell of his host, the latter asked him what he thought of the American people. "Well," answered the nobleman, "1 like them immensely, but 1 miss something." "What is that?" asked the Yankee. "I miss the . aristocracy," replied the Englishman. "Wtiat are they?" naively asked his host. "The aristocracy!" said the noble man in a somewhat surprised tone of voice. "Why, they are people who do nothing, you know; whose fathers did nothing, you know; wiiose grand fathers did nothing, you know—in fact, the aristocracy " Here he was interrupted by the American, who chimed in with: "Oh, we've plenty of them over here; but we don't call them aristo cracy—we call them tramps."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IV [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

IV. It was dinner-hour at the Widgers', and the Widger family was seated at the table. But Elinor Parish was not there, and Ivan Slinski, entering, ob j served that no place was laid for her. i Nor, if it came to that, for himself, j He was received in silence. No i one, indeed, troubled to look at him. i He closed the door and drew himself ! up to his full height. "I am in receipt of a note from you, j madame," he said, addressing Mrs. Widger. "We'll go into that after dinner, mossoo," replied the landlady, hur riedly. "Pardon, it must be now," insisted the Pole. "Take your old penny-whistles and clear out," said the gas-worker, with rough good-nature. "I intend to do nothing of the kind," replied Slinski deliberately. "It is not convenient to me just now to change my lodgings." "It is convenient to us, though," said Mrs. Witgtr with asperity. "The bandmaster of Bigbeach," de clared Slinski, airily, "cannot afford I to have his arrangements upset by a ' lodging-house keeper. This m...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
She Had Her Own Plans. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

She Had Her Own Plans. The professor was explaining to his class of young women the theory of the complete renewal of the body every seven years. "Thus, Miss Adams," he said to a very pretty young woman, "in seven years you will no longer be Miss Ad ams." The young lady cast down her eyes demurely as she replied: "Well, I sincerely hope that I shall not."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Inside Information. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Inside Information. "Urn, yes! Ah! Um!" remarked the medico in his best bedside man ner to his patient, as they stood in the consulting-room. "I'll give you the following prescription." And he handed him the small packages. The patient opened them and read the directions. "A powder for my headache," he said aloud, "a pellet for my liver," he continued, "and a capsule for my gouty foot." Then he stopped and pondered deeply for a moment. "I say, doctor," he queried, "how'll the little beggars know the right place to go when they get inside?"

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Extravagant. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

Extravagant. She was the youngest of eight chil dren in a minister's family, and as his salary was not large she already had learned^ that there were many things the family could not have. One day her father told her that she had a new baby sister. "Well, papa," she said bravely, "I suppose it's all right, but it seems to me there were a lot of things we needed more."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Short Ride. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 30 January 1915

A Short Ride. An old Irishwoman travelling on a train one day noticed that two young men who were fellow-passengers and who were , travelling on passes did not pay. Turning to them, she said: '"How does it come that you young men do not pay, while an old woman like me has to pay?" "Oh," they explained, "we are tra velling on our looks." She looked from one to the other a few seconds, and then said: "Sure, and you must "be near your journey's end."

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

^iWfViiim(ni"Wii Next to the Doctor 60MES THE Nurses9 Opinion. A TESTIMONY TO CLEMENTS TONIC I BtakiagJutn Aveaae. Ccburs, Vic., 3/4/12. S12E3EMTS TONIC LTD. "I know Clements Toaic is used extensively by the profession, and nurses know its value and are seldom without it* Once a patient got very weak and low spirited, and I gave her Clements Tonic. A few doses made a change (or the better, she rapidly be came bright and cheerful, it gave her health and strength and soon put her on her feet again, which made her a firm believer in Clements Tonic. Since, 1 have given it to many patients with the same good results, I am at a loss to know how we, who look after the sick, could get on without that splendid medicine. (Sinned) NURSE GARD." I This Medicine is the beat to be taken for Constipation, uric Acid in the Blood, Weak Kidneys, Indigestion, Low Spirits, Sick Headache. Loss of Sleep, Poor Appetite, Biliousness or Poor Blood. All STORKS and CHHMIST3 SSLL IT. JOEIB3' SKTOW «SS CO., The ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Cycling and Motor Notes. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

9 It would be difficult to over-estimate the part automobiles are playing in the greatest of all wars .that i9 at present in operation. A bare list of the various types of motor vehicles that are being employed, and the equally varied range of purposes to whieh they are being ap plied would take up two oolumns, and it is safe to say that the conditions on which warfare will be conducted in tha future will be still further radi cally altered as a result of the experi ence that is being gained in the awful straggle against our enemies. It was of course long since realised that motor vehicles would displace horses in the maintenance of supplies to the front, but perhaps one of the developments which was not quite so certain is the prominent part armoured gun carrying cars are taking in the operations. There seems some doubt whether the main credit for this departure is due to the enetny or the. brave Belgians, but so . far as tha.. Allies are concerned the latter have undoubtedly shown...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WARNIMG TO DYSPEPTICS. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

WARNIMG TO DYSPEPTICS. Many interesting paragraphs have re cently appeared in the Press concerning the remarkable antacid . properties pos sessed by Bisurated Magnesia, and thousands of people now regularly take half a-tea-spoonful of the preparation in a little cold water after their meals as s safeguard against indigestion, dyspep sia, heartburn, flatulence, etc. It ap pears, however, that in several instances other forms of magnesia, bearing some what similar names, have been nsed, often with very unpleasant resnlts. To giisrd against dangerous substitution, and ensure against getting the genuine product as recommended by physicians, re^djeri should ask their chemist de stinctly for Bisurated Magnesia and in sist on being supplied in bottles having ;he full name—Bisurated Magtusia— jIowq m the glass.

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Letter from Egypt. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

Private P. Marks, of the 2nd Infan® try Brigade of the Australian Expedi tionary forces in Egypt* has written to his parents in Linton. We extract the following "I received yoar-postcards- all right and was very pleased to hear from yoa. I received them when I was at Port Said. Wo are having a pretty rough timt of it here on the desert. Wears camped just near the Pyramids ; they are a si^hfc well worth seeing> I am glad that I came» I have seen a big part of the world now, and will see a lot more before I am finishedi It ia Christmas Day that I wrote this letter, but no different to any other day to ust just the same old drill, no holiday. I hope, mum, that you are not worrying over me, because I will come back if , things keep going as they are now* We had a lovely trip over the water. It wag a very exciting time on bt>ard the boats the time the Sydney sank the Em den, the German cruiser. We saw the fight. We had 20 prisoners on our boat off the Emden. They were a fine lot of...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Skipton Anglers' Club visit Ballarat. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

Skipton Anglers' (M visit Batlarat On Saturday last the Skipton ang lers journeyed to Ballarat in a large motor lorry. The visitors, numbering 30, arrived in Ballarat about 11 a.m. Some found their way to the Miuers' Racecourse, where the Trot was in pro gress. No doubt the ill reports of VVen douree during the last, few weeks was responsible for about 15 anglers arriving at the Lake View only 2 p.m., under the official wing of Mr J. Whittaker. Here they were met by the officers of the Ballarat Club, and after being re galed with light refreshments, were es- i corted to Mr Bob Taylor's jetty, and under the guidance of' Messrs B. Heath and C. Groves were taken on to the grounds where the fish were most likely to bite. During the afternoon the vari ous boats were visited by Mr D. F. S. Miller (president), and Messrs A< Drummond and V. R. Allan, who re freshed each unit with a little stimulant. In more than one case it was a matter of "You've saved my life!". It was 8 o'cloc...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A Century After Waterloo. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

V Dr. Fitcbett, in the February number of " Life," just issued, turns back the pages of history and points out that exactly a century ago Europe was just freeing itself from a despotism built on force, and using war as its instrument. " And," says Dr. Fitchett, "3915 is born amid the shock of battles which iu scale: and slaughter are equal to "a hun dred Waterloos. Waterloo was des cribed by Wellington himself as ' the battle which did more for the peace of the world than any other battle in record ed history.' Il certainly put an end to Napoleon's restless and insatiable ambi tion, and so delivered the nations from & military despotism. But in 1915 four of the great Western Powers, with Japan, the greatest power in the East, as ally, are leagued to deliver the civilised world from the menace of a military caste which lacks Napoleon's genius of war—lacks even bis civic genius—but aims, like him, at a despotism built on force, and using war as an instrument; a caste whose tri...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

12 Months duaranfee, 12/6 each. Sole Indian 123 Start Tel. 505. for tfis District, St., Opp. Post Office. 'Commonwealth HEAD OFFICE "i>s Bank is open foT all classes of GENERAL BANKING BUSii^lEESS rOST OFFICE BUILDINGS, Stiiri & Lydiard Sts., BALLARAT 'iieu at Melbourne, Sydney, Newcastle, Broken Hill, Dubbo, Canberra, A<J«« :aide, Perth, Hobart, Brlsba.no, Rbekhampton« Townsville and London, >j'o'e remittances node to, and drafts drawn on Foreign places direct. Foreign bills negotiated and 'Collected. Letters of credit issued to any pare of the world. Bills negotiated or forwarded for collection. Banking and Exchange Business of every description transacted within the Common wealth, United Kingdom ana abroad. Currist accounts opened. Interact paid on fixed deposits. Advances mtde tg-aiusc approved securities. 1 SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT Branch Office: BALLARAT. Victorian Contrail Office; 317/ COLLINS STREET, MELBOORNE, branches in the above cities and 2,000 A...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Grenvilleshire Counil. THURSDAY, 4TH FEBRUARY, 1915. [Newspaper Article] — Grenville Standard — 6 February 1915

Thursday, 4th Febbetaby, 1915. Present—Crs Kennedy (president), Wallis, Douglas, Nunn, Clarke, Poynton, Shepherd and Vanghan. An apology for absence was received from Cr Blakeley. TENDERS. No. 13/15—Supply of 250 cubic yards blue metal on the main Smythesdale road, Jas. Birs (accepted) ... £81 4 0 A. E. Walker ... ... 81 5 0 John Urch ... ... 86 0 0 No. 14/15—Supply of 300 cubic yards blue metal on Boss' Greek road, and 100 oabic yards between Rowe'a and Medwell'a. , Pa vies aad'Doeririgv •: ... £126 5 0 H.Tudor V ... v ... 124 19 0 W. Lyle & Sons?(accepted) 118 10 0 No. 15/15—Supply of 250 cubic yards blue metal on Pitfieid road, between Cape Clear and Newtown. John Urch ... ... £92 0 0 Edwin Hogan ... ... 87 0 0 M.Leahy ... ... 84 6 0 P. Hynes (accepted) ... 84 2 6 P. Nolan ... ... 92 10 0 No. 16/15—Supply of 300 cabio yards quartz on the Skipton road. - Con. Hogan ... ... £67 10 0 Walter T. Nunn (accepted) 52 10 0 No. 17/15—Supply of 300 cubic yards quartz on the Geelong ...

Publication Title: Grenville Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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