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Title: Shepparton News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 22,752 items from Shepparton News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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DOGS AND MOVING PICTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

DOGS ANO MOVING PICTURES. A moving-picture show -was recent ly given in London to determine what effect a cinematograph picture had on the intelligence of animals. A series of motion pictures were reeled off in a darkened room before an audience of prize dogs? First some pictures of a dog show wero run through. The dogs walked up and had a look at it, and turned away, obviously bored and uninterested. Evidently the sub ject was too familiar. They woke up, however, when an elephant came splashing into a pool of water and ap peared to lie walking into the room. A massive bulldog made a dash for the screen. With his head up and ears pricked, he got Teady to attack, and the whole audience 'barked and bayed in blood-curdling discord. ^Pictures of birds also irritated them, but when other animals were shown they quick ly recognised that they -were not look ing at the real thing, and in a few seconds quieted down completely. The general result of the experiment seemed to be that dogs do no...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Wife Scored [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

The Wife Scored Husband: Do you know that every ! time a 'woman gets angry she aaus a new wrinkle to her late? " Wile: iNo, 1 did not; hut, i£ it is so, 'I presume it is a wise provision of na ture to let the world know what sort of husband a woman has!

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CARE OF CREAM. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

CARE OF CREAM. For the factory manger to turn out a first-grade butter be requires the help of the farmer. The cream must i be delivered in the best order pos sible. Cleanliness in the dairy is an essential condition. Cream cans are returned washed, but it is very neces sary that they should be thoroughly cleansed and scalded again at the farm before use. For segarating, a special room should be provided, at least 30 yardB to windward of the milking shed, have a concrete floor, be provided with good drainage, well ventilated, and have a good supply of water. The milk should be separated aB soon as possible, and while the animal heat is in the milk. The cream should at once be cooled to the lowest possible temperature; and, as the water required is small, this should present no serious difficulty. Under no circumstances should, cream from one skimming be mixed with cream from another skimming unless it has first been well cooled. The moBt unsatisfactory of all suppliers is the man wh...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

PITTS' POtSOitED WHEAT- ■ Wot Destroying Kats, Mice, rtparrows and Parrots, eta. it is the only esriarn ana son urn* preparation. ksium all inu la M. liars* i/-i /allow 1/1 rmimtr ansa. Peace does not dwell in outward tilings, but within the mind; we may preserve it in tlie midst of the bitter est pain, if our will remain firm and submissive. Peace iu this lite springs from • acquiescence even in disagree able things, not in an exemption from suifering. FOR CHILDREN TEETHING, <here la nothing equal to KERNOT'S BOOTH LNQ POWDERS. They are a safe and certain remedy; 1/- pkta.; posted 1/1 stamps. KJSitNOT, Chemist, QEJELONQ. God made man first; then He made woman; then He felt so sorry for man that He made—tobacco. The pleasure we best enjoy is that we have-divided with others. AT LAST! High-Class Swedish Separators available at Prlcea HITHERTO UNKNOWN. Our Introduction ot the NEW MODEL "VEGA" haa dealt a death-blow to Exorbitant Prlcea charged by our competitors. MAKE NO MI...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too Much for the Ghost. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

I I • Too Much for the Ghoit •' Archbishop Thomson once "laid" a ghost in a very simple way. Staying at a country house with traditions of a family ghost, be was put up for the night in the "haunted chamber." In the morning bis hosts were anx ious to know ifthe had seen anything.; "Oh, yes," he replied; "about twelve o'clock I heard a- knock at the door. • I said, '.Come in, come in.'" "And.did jhe come7" . "Yes; an old sallow-jooking man." "Yes, that is our ghost! . What did you do?" . "I got out" of b<?d and asked\ it 'he belonged to'the houBe. ^e nodded-as sent. I asked htm'II b© vi&re a. pair .Ishioneiv'' Hp iK^ded| agaty. ' f I eai^, '.'I ani anxIbu,a'to btflld sotqe pew schools; vfllr {ou give me a' subscrip tion?' He disappeared and I saw him no morel" 'The teacher was addressing his pu pils-on" jihe subjects of laziness and idleness. He drew a-terrible picture of the habitual loa<ey—the man who dis likes work ah4; wh[o*'beg8 for all he* .gets. '...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Too True. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

Tpp True. Tljeye I? a l\appy mean. in every-, thing. It 1b 6^3 that a stored o{q la^y hear3 ^er marrletf "daughter say: "jf'my husband doesn't do such and such a thing, he'll find himself in hot water." "My-child." said the old lady, "a man is like an egg- Kept in hot water a littlo while ho may bail soft, but keep him there long and he hardens!".

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING SUGGESTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

dairying suggestions. The following suggestions are the experience of Mr. W- M. Rider, of the Winona Agricultural College, U.S.A.: Test your herd for economic produc tion. Weigh milk from each cow night and morning, one day each month. Take samples of each milking and test it for butter fat.' Knowing the inllk and fat given in one day, use these figures as an aver age, day's production for the current month, and, 'by multiplying the milk and fat produbed 'by the number of days in the month, you obtain the total amount of milk and butter fat (in pounds) produced for one month. Weigh feed fed on day of test, and from the cost of each feed figure the cost of feed fed eacty cp\y on gay of test. From I he daily cost of fee^ per qo^i compute the cost of her feed for one month'.' If life milk is sol4 as milk, compute the value of eacij cow's milk for . tfte month at the nijarket price received. Knowing the money Y$lue of each cow's milk for the month, and the cost of her feed, one can find...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
A BERESFORD IN WAR-TIME. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

A BEHE8K0RD IN WAR-TIME: The Buresforau" have all been fa mous lor lae courage lout -DOruerB on jcCiiieosuesb. jLiuru Wiiuam litjres iuiu aervea in me Ziuiy war m la (J, vmmiiig uie y,u., auu iu ills book, Luuiijujgub^oi a War uorresponuent," mi\ lueuou rriur.reiates some striking slories ot {11 w:— ; iu iuii l'biveac l^ord William Beres tuiu, turning arouua, saw we tour legs 01 a xuie oorse MCKiug m tne air, iieaiiBitig ai once mat a belonged 10 oiie 01 our men, lie'roae straigut lor n, fiua touua iiiai cue norse hua oeeu snot una mat tile nuer nau tanen uaii tjtuuued. "uti up!" iiord William said to the man, but ue seemed tu (lazed to an swer; wuereupou i_>oru William said, "it you dou'i get up at onths i win jump dowli anu puucb your head!" —at which the man did rise slowly. Loi'U William succeeded in helping mm on to the liorse behind him; once uiouiueu, tne mau clutched iseresford around tne waist, and so they gallop ed oft'. Ait the time this \y^s takiQg place the" !£uiiis ...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Avoiding Eye-Strain. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

Avoiding Eye-Strain. iiyc-stram iu aaiu to be largely a Ueicci ui civilisation. 10 counteract li, oiniuitu should ue encouraged to use Uieir eyes at long range. "A teacher wiio has a surprisingly small amount 01. eye-strain among uer pupils attri Luiti n to lier practice 01 malting the scnoiars drop-meir worn at the end ol eacn hour and 10011 put ot tue wiu uow. There is a contest as to wiio cau see the farthest. Ibis rests and naius tliu eyes and teaches observa tion a woman who does fine sewing for ner living lound her eyes strained and wuaK. s>ue was advised to dtop her sewing every hait-liour and Iook ior i.: minute into space. Kelief was quiaK, and' the eye-strain disappeared, Shortsighted people, wlio hold their boon or work close will eaae eye strain and lengthen their vision if they frequently remove their glasses end look- at some object on. the hori zon, . The long-diatance training will not, hovyever, relieve eye-strain that comes from astigmatism, reckless dis regard ...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Impure Air and Scrofula. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

impure Air and Scrofula. The atmosphere of all rooms should Lie frequently renewed by proper ven tilation. The best method of accom I.lishing this has been for many years a subject closely studied by sanitar ians. in rooms, and especially in bed rooms, the fireplace should ahvayB be ieft unclosed. The windows should be pulled down from the top, and up from the bottom. All roams, and es pecially sleeping apartments, should tie well aired during the day. Impure air in bedrooms is considerd by emin ent medical authorities to- be one of the most potent cauaes of consumption and scrofula. A well-known French physician wjio has devqteil wtich at tention to studies of this natur* says: "It will often be found, on examina tion, that scrofulous diseases are caused by vitiated air, and it is not always necssary that there Bhould have been a prolonged stay in such an atmosphere. Only a few hours each day is sufficient; and a person may live in a most healthy district, pass the greater part of ...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Suppers. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

HEALTH NOTES. The Evil of Late Supper*. - Late or. heavy suppers are a com mon cause of ' insomnia, especially that form, of it in,which people fall into a heavy sleep, only to awake with a start an ■ hour or two later and find themselves unable to sleep again until early ■ morning ..perhaps. . Digestion comes almost to a dead stop during sleep, so that sufllclent time should be allowed for the last meal to be dis posed of before the hour for retiring. This interval Bhould be two hours at .least, which means that half-past eight is as a rule late enough for the evening meal._ In any case, the food which is taken then ought to be of a light nature, and not include' pork, cold meat, or any other article of diet which is slow of digestion. Coffee and strong tea are unsuitable at this aour, as ihey tend to cause sleep lessness. Cocoa, made with water, is a much better 'beverage for use with :1 e evening meal or after 'it.

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOR THE FARMER. HOUSING POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

FOR THE FABMER. HOUSING POULTRY.; If all poultry houses of the closed in type' had' an end or one side of them knocked out, disease would dim inish by one-half, and the profits from the birds compelled to roost in them would, probably, be doubled. It is impossible to conceive anything more insanitary and- conducive to disease than the ordinary type of fowlhouse one sees in the country. It is cramp ed, dark and without'any ventilation, except the many draughty cracks. It is little wonder that going from the foetid atmosphere into often an un sheltered yard the birds contract colds, and soon become a prey to dis ease. It were far better to let the hens roost in. trees. The sleeping quarters of fowls should be merely draught-proof shelters from extremes of weather and, if winter eggs be de sired, they should have dry scratch ing quarters for bad weather. Always have your poultry houses open to the north.

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IN FANNY BURNEY'S GARDEN. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

s IN FANNY BURNEY'S GARDEN. ' An amusing account of the liorti- | cultural pursuits—aiuu lueputuqe—ot General u'Aruiay, tue u reiicn emigre wno became t liimy uuriiey'B nus oand, ' is giveu m 'an article in tue •uornhiirr oy sir Henry Liucy:— 'me young coupie o^feuu tneir mai rlect iue lii; apariraeius in a' lanh nouse on tiie summit ot Baguen mil, i hence" they moved to a somewnat larger cottage iU.nooKnam. Jnuany, wnen "Uann'iia" proved a financial success, tney bunt tiiemseives : a uouse on the outskirts ot Noroury ram, known during tneir residence as "Camilla cottage."1' From tne hrst," Al. d'Arblay, con scious of inaaeiiuacy to Dear nis lair snare in the wherewithal tor meeting the cost ot the little uousehoiu, de veloped a tearsome t'renay tor gar dening. fursuit hi tue vocation' in volved linn in deiigluiully luaicrous dilemmas. Writing unuer date April, r<s»4, irom the cottage at Bookuam, the young wile sayB:— "■ihiuK of our Horticultural shock last 'week when Mrs...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FATTENING POULTRY. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

FATTENING POULTRY. Tlie best and, at the same time, most economical method 01 fattening ail kinds of poultry is to keep them m confinement tor a shore time before they are required for table. A good deai of judgment, however, has to be exercised in deciding the length of time this confinement is to last, for if overdone, even in the slightest de gree, the birds rapidly lose flesh and go back in condition. Strange as it may seem, once this begins, no amount of feeding will restore either their weight or condition tili after they have regained their liberty again. For this reason the poultry must be confined for too long a period before they are required.

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Heart of a Girl. (All Rights Reserved.) CHAPTER III.—Continued. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

Till Heart of a Girl By HENRY FARMER, Author of "The Money-Lender," "12a Qui'try Street," "Bondage," etc. (All Rlght6 Reserved.) CHAPTER 111?—Continued. Queenie drew back a pace as MI-' chael Thorne stepped into the gas-lit passage without invitation. He was much better dressed than when he quitted the bouse four months back. He was looking several ytars older. Perhaps it was the stress and strain of getting the better of his fellow-gamblers in the copper market, where fortunes were made and men went smash in a day. He had lost" flesh, and the protrusion of his pow erful lower jaw seemed more pro nounced, his eyes deper set and their' expression more vague, more secret ive. He looked a vulgarian still. No one could have called him good-look ing, this young-old man, who a few months hack was merely regarded as a punctual, plodding clerk. Yet pretty, ' nineteen-year-old Beryl Price wor- , shipped him hopelessly—with the characteristic hopelessness of nine teen. Dogged strength was per...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
IRON FOR FOWLS. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

IRON FOR FOWLS. Iron is present in the fowl's body; part of this iron is in an organised lorm in the red corpuscles of the blood. The total amount of iron is small, but nevertheless, it is of great importance, and a deficiency re suits in anaemia. One frequently finds that eggs laid by insufficiently fed fowls have pale yolks. The coloring of the yolti is due to pigments, and, possibly, to the phospholipid termed lecithin, iron, in an organised form, is found in the ash of tne egg. Vegetable foods, es pecially clover and lucerne, are rich in minerals, and their use results in richiy-coiored yolks. Anaemic fowls may be easily treated by administer ing to each live drops of perchloride of iron in a teaspoon of well-sweeten ed milk. This is a very cheap tonic, and is better in many ways than the ordinary sulphate of iron (copperas).

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DAIRYING. WHY WASH THE UDDER? [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

! DAIRYING. WHY WA8H. JME UDDER7 . There are many points in clean | dairying which, if observed closely, would obviate milk contamination, and consequent complaints about in ferior cream and Butter.'. Here are some points of advice: Washing the cow's udder, is fre quently necessary. Should the pad dock in which the cows have been accustomed to lie down during the r.ight be not clean—very few are clean enough—then the udders should be washed before milking. Cows for aging in unclean places, especially, during drought,, render washing their udders imperative. The cow-yard is usually muddy In some degree during wet weather. As' the cow walks to and from the ball sho generally makes a beaten pacli,. and when wet this track becomes a continuous manure track. The oow kicks up 011 to the udder pieces of thls^contaminated soil, and the udder is thus unclean when milking time begins. The milker's hands are often a fruitful source of ;milk contamination during the operation of making. The dam...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHICK. Present-day poultry science gives these facts in the development of the chick:— [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHICK. Present-day poultry science gives these facts in the development of the chick:— " Twelve Hours alter incubation lias begun the lineaments of the head and body are discovered. Close observa uuu lias lound me heart to 'beat .y the close of the day. At the end ol 48 hours two vesicles of blood are distinguished, pulsations of which are visible. At the fiftieth hour an auricle of the heart appears.' At the end of 70 hours undistinguished wings, and on the head two bubbles for the brain, one for the bill, and two oth *ers for the fore-part and the hinder part of the head. The liver appears towards the fifth day. At the end of 131 hours the first voluntary motion is observed. . Seven hours later the lungs and stomach become \visible, and the intestines, the loins, and the upper jaw are seen at the end of 142 hours. The seventh .day the brain, which is slimy, begins to have some • consistence. At the 190th. hour of incubation the bill opens, and the fiesh appears ...

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mutual Secrets. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

Mutual Secret*..' "I didn't want to come here in the first place," confided the first guest at. the expensive hotel in a well-known winder holiday resort on the South Coast. • I "Na more did I," replied the second; "but my wife insisted on my coming." "So did mine," said the-first. '-''She said we had to come jdjst because the Smithsons were coining, 'although'i simply told her we could : not" ^ffrird •the expense."'. !' ' ' '"And 'that'# w^at I sai^,". expired the second, "ib^t my wifp e^i^ tye (jaq I to come ty© Bwwuboob were coming" \ ; "Why, look ' here, niy nsz^e is Browhson." "And mine la Smithson." •Then the two men shook one an other warmly".by the haric|. Each high achievement is * si^n and token of tt\e ^vhole nature's j>08 ability!a plppp qt the mn'n for tb^t ehlni^g iqoinent it is tHe qaty ot-tJjp wflole t^n tq fre .i-./ays; He to tbtt -truly oaurageouaowm whs never deBjgondi.

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GRIT A NECESSITY. [Newspaper Article] — Shepparton News — 8 January 1914

GRIT A NECESSITY. A lack of this causes a. slow supply of eggs, and if fowls have not the materials for digesting their food, it is impossible for them to get on, for the proper nutriment must be extract ed from, the .food for the production of eggs. Oyster shell grit for lime, as well as sea shell or pebbly beach grit, is best for the purpose, as it. is very hard and sharp; and a small quantity goes a long way. It should be kept in a trough in the'run for the fowls to help themselves to.

Publication Title: Shepparton News
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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