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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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ANOTHER ROOSEVELT STORY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ANOTHER ROOSEVELT STORY. "The first time I ever saw President Roose- velt," writes a Washington journalist, "was when he was a Civil Service Commissioner. I was told to interview Mr. Roosevelt touching some civil service question. When I reached the commissioner's home I was shown to the library, and pretty soon Mr. Roosevelt walked in. He came to me, and gave me a warm hand- shake, and went right to business by saying: "I'm glad to see you, but sorry, my young friend, you represent the paper you do. The editor of your paper is an infamous scoundrel and unmitigated liar. Yes, sir, that's just what he is; but I know you can't help it. All heaven and earth couldn't keep him from being just what he is. Be good enough to tell him I said this. Now, blaze away, and tell me what you wish to know, and I'll do the best I can by you." And then, after delivering himself of his private opinion of my boss, Mr. Roosevelt gave me all the facts I wished, and the last word he said to me was not to f...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GERMAN DRINK BILL. SOME STARTLING FACTS AND FIGURES. "FIVE GLASSES OF GIN A DAY." [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

GERMAN DRINK BILL.   SOME STARTLING FACTS AND   FIGURES.   "FIVE GLASSES OF GIN A DAY." The Society for the Suppression of Alcoholism     recently held a meeting at Breslau, at which some       disquieting statements were made by the speakers     on the subject of the consumption of alcohol in     Germany. The question affects all classes in Ger-     many, from the lowest to the highest. The poor     drink gin and brandy, and those above     them are no less addicted to the drink     habit in other forms. With the stu-     dents drinking has gradually become a re-     gular sport, and the attitude amongst them to-     wards it is fairly summed up in t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Nicknames in Society. FROM ROYALTY DOWNWARDS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Nicknames in Society. FROM ROYALTY DOWNWARDS. One cannot fail to be impressed of late with   the fact that nicknames are becoming very much   more common than formerly. This holds true   in every rank of life, from the very highest   downward—in fact, few popular persons escape   them (writes the "Scotsman").   The King himself among his own particular   set is generally spoken of as "The Master."   The Duke of Cambridge, on account of his con-   nection with the Royal parks, is known as   "George the Ranger," while the Princess Charles   of Denmark is always called "Harry" by her   family.     As is well known, the Duke of Westminster   is known as "Bend Or," The Duke of Athol   has been dubbed "All Scotland," the Duke of   Marlborough's nickname is "Sonny," the Du...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THEATRICAL. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THEATRICAL.   "The Smart Set" magazine for November (Ess   Ess Publishing Company, St. James' Building) revives old memories by its stories of the Prince of Wales (now King Edward), as a theatre-goer. Mrs. John Wood, a favorite actress in both America and England—retired from the stage, but not forgotten—was playing the heroine in John Brougham's burlesque, Pocohontas, re- christened La Belle Sauvage, at the St. James' Theatre, London, and the Prince sent for her after the performance to tender his congratula- tions upon her great success. Brilliantly beau- tiful in the rich costume of the Indian Princess, attended by the chief officials of her court, and guarded by an escort of picked super-savages, Mrs. Wood entered the reception-room with an air of Royalty paying a visit to Royalty. Tak- ing the cue at once, the Prince kissed her hand fraternally, and presented her to his suite as Her Royal Highness the Princess Pocohontas of Virginia. Apparently the you...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ARMORED WHALES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

ARMORED WHALES.   It may be news to many readers that in the past epochs of this world's history armour-clad whales disported themselves in the deep. The modern whales and porpoises are devoid of all hard parts on their skin surface; but Mr. Lyddeker, a prominent scientist, points out that traces and survivals of the armor casing of the past are still to be discovered in the com- mon porpoises, and in a Japanese species. The idea of a big cetacean protected like an arma- dillo is certainly striking, and the purpose of the investment was doubtless that of defence against enemies, as well as the protection of the body in case of collision with rocks. The disappear- ance of the armored condition, it is pointed out, probably commenced when the whales took to a more free and easy life in the open sea. Greater rapidity of movement, and the develop- ment of flexibility of body, necessary for the exercise of free swimming powers, would cause the armor plating to vanish, while t...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SUBMARINE TRAM. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A SUBMARINE TRAM.   A syndicate of French capitalists has been   formed to purchase and work a new passenger   omnibus that travels under water attached to a   cable. Security, habitability, and speed are   the desiderata (writes the London "Daily Ex- press"), and the first-named quality is one that the inventor regards as established beyond a shadow of a doubt. Being airtight, no danger is possible from an influx of water. Powerful air-pumps expel the vitiated atmosphere, rein- forcing it from reservoirs of compressed oxygen and azote. Infinitely safer than an underground railway, or the sub-Channel tunnel that Sir Edward Wat- kin used to recommend to Parliament with such insistence, there is no danger from a falling wall or any of the other fatal possibilities on sub- terranean or even surface railways. Moreover, M. Goubet's system embraces a 'twixt-shores cable attachment, which further removes the chance of acciden...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A Mammoth Gun. KILLING AT 15 MILES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A Mammoth Gun. KILLING AT 15 MILES. The United States Government, has of recent   months been devoting specially active attention   to the perfecting of new engines of war, and since   the accession of President Roosevelt, himself a practical soldier, these energies have received   an added impulse. It is no secret (writes a cor-   respondent) that the head officials of the War     and Navy Departments at Washington believe   that in regard to high-power guns and explosives   and in submarine torpedo vessels this country   now possesses inventions which place it far in ad-   vance of any other country of the world. In   facilities for technical training in the art of   war; too, the United States, which, with West   Point and Annapolis, has long held a leading   place, now intends to distanc...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE COUNT CAME FIRST. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE COUNT CAME FIRST. "Miss Bondy has married some blooming titled   foreigner." "Count?" "I think he did."— Smart Set.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POSTHUMOUS HONOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

POSTHUMOUS HONOR. Philatelists will be interested to learn that the   portrait of the late American President is likely   to be used on postage stamps in the States. By a   curious regulation, the portrait of no living man   is allowed to appear on the stamps of the United   States, which only bear the effigies of dead Pre-   eidents and Republican heroes. A new series of   stamps is now in consideration by the American   Government, and doubtless the late President's   portrait will be included along with his co-   martyrs, Lincoln and Garfield.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"MY GRANDFATHER'S CLOCK." REVIVED IN AMERICA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

"MY GRANDFATHER'S CLOCK" REVIVED IN AMERICA. The now almost forgotten "Grandfather's Clock," once the best-known song in Great Bri- tain, is revived by the following incident in America:—News received from Oswego on No- vember 9 states that Russell De Lashmutt, an   Oregon pioneer, aged 82, was stricken with para- lysis on Tuesday and is dying. In 1854 De Lash- mutt bought an old-fashioned clock. It kept good time until one day in 1876, when it stopped short. A few days later word was received from the East that De Lashmutt's youngest son died the day the clock stopped. All efforts to start the timepiece failed, and a new one was pur- chased. Last Tuesday at exactly the same hour the old man was stricken, the new clock stopped and the old clock, which had not run since 1876, gathered itself together, emitted a ghastly sound, and gave six solemn strokes, then stopped again. Dr. Strickland, the attending physician, says De Lashmutt will probably die to-morrow, six days af...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE COST OF WAR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE COST OF WAR.   The great wars of the world during the last fifty years have cost not far short of two million lives, counting those alone who died from wounds, and not from subsequent sickness. The Crimean War claimed 750,000 victims, the Ame- rican Civil War 800,000, the Franco-Prussian campaign 215,000 (of whom nearly two-thirds were French). Over 30,000 men fell in South Af- rican wars before the present campaign, 25,000 in the Bulgaro-Servian struggle, and 25,000 in the Afghan campaign. According to the last monthly return issued by the War Office, the present struggle in South Africa has cost us— counting only those who were killed in action or who died from wounds—648 officers and 5832 men, a total of 6380. Disease, however, has   claimed far more victims than shot or shell in   the present war, the figures being 10,550.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE MOST COSTLY DRESS IN THE WORLD. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE MOST COSTLY DRESS IN THE WORLD. The ordinary woman considers £10 to £20 a   fair price for a gown. Nevertheless women have   frequently worn, and are still wearing, gowns   worth many thousands of dollars. For instance, £10,000 was the price paid for a gown worn recently by a New York woman at a reception held at the French Embassy in Rome. The train was thickly embroidered in diamonds. Another New Yorker appeared in London a year or two ago at a fashionable ball in a dress em- broidered in spangles of 18-carat gold, manufac- tured specially for her at a fabulous cost. Mrs. Celia Wallace on one occasion gave £7000 for a single dress, the Brussels lace with which it was trimmed costing £5000. What will undoubtedly be the most costly dress ever made is being completed at the present time in Paris for the favorite wife of some Eastern potentate. The dress consists almost entirely of precious stones and metals. The lower part is of beaten gold ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Artist and Houseboat. A COMING AMERICAN DIVORCE. QUIET LIFE IN INLAND WATERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Artist and Houseboat.           A COMING AMERICAN DIVORCE. QUIET LIFE IN INLAND WATERS.   The real story of married life on a houseboat   when the last mail left America was to be related   in a few days to the Supreme Court of the United   States by Almira C. Lawton, a watercolor artist,   with a studio at Seventh-avenue and 137th-street,   who is suing her husband, Frank H. Lawton, a   pianist, for separation, on the ground that he in-   veigled her into marrying him so they could cruise   on his houseboat, and when he got out into Lake   Champlain he made her do all the work, even to   heaving the anchor.   He said he could not do the manual labor, she   says, because his fingers would become stiff and   corns would grow in the palms of ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A KENTUCKY VENDETTA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A KENTUCKY VENDETTA. A regular Corsican vendetta was carried on   for many years in Kentucky between two fami-   lies, who mutually considered it a sacred duty   to slay each other when opportunity offered.   At last, however, a son of one of the rival houses   fell in love with a daughter of the other, so the families decided to make peace and allow the marriage. Every member of the respective families came armed to the wedding, however, and, as no clergyman was willing to venture among such a lawless lot, a neighboring magis- trate performed the ceremony, grasping a re- volver in his hand meanwhile to protect him- self. The bridegroom was obliged to hold his hands up throughout to show that he did not in- tend pulling out any weapon, and in order to al- low him to put on the ring without lowering his hands the bride stood upon a chair. A floral revolver also replaced the usual marriage bell over the happy couple's he...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Towns that Punish Flirting. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

Towns that Punish Flirting. The course of true love is made rough for sweethearts in many towns in the United States by the interference of the law. At Scranton, Pa., lovers are apparently re-   garded with especial disfavor. The shaded streets of the aristocratic section of the town known as Green Ridge are favorite resorts of courting couples. The residents, however, do not take kindly to the presence of lovers there, and the other day five couples were caught and haled before the Court. What is more, they were actually fined 3dol. each. Atlantic City has also adapted repressive mea- sures. The policeman who patrols the beach each evening was last summer furnished with a baton which by touching a button could be converted into a brilliant incandescent lamp. With the rays of this light beating into every nook and corner, the officer carefully searched all the pavilions along the shore for couples who might be spoon- ing there. Trenton, N.J., to another rough place for ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HER ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

  HER ECONOMY.   Mrs. Faltte—She isn't a very good manager, is she? Mrs. Finde—No, indeed! Why, she had to buy four extra turkeys so as not to waste the   dressing she had made for one.— "Harper's   Bazaar."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
COSTLY PLATE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

COSTLY PLATE.           Few people possess plate worth such a fabul-   ous sum as that owned by London's Lord Mayor   during his term of office. Its face value has been computed to be slightly over £20,000, though three times that amount would not buy it, owing   to the historical interest attached to many of the   articles.   The two solid silver soup-tureens, which are   employed at the banquet to distribute 100 gallons of clear turtle to the guests, are valued at £500 apiece, and are said to have been in possession   of the corporation for over a century.   Moreover, there are a gross of silver dinner   plates worth £1500, 200 ice-pails valued at nearly   £1000, 200 entree dishes, the cost of which   £2000 would not cover; 80 solid silver meat   dishes worth anot...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WAR. SOME PRACTICAL TRUTHS. MORE TRAINED TROOPS WANTED. A military correspondent, writing to the "West minster Budget," says:— [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

THE WAR.       SOME PRACTICAL TRUTHS. MORE TRAINED TROOPS   WANTED. A military correspondent, writing to the "West-   minster Budget," says:—   It is high time that people realised that our army in South Africa is being worn away, even more rapidly than the fighting forces of the enemy. The drafts which are being sent out weekly, or nearly so, are barely sufficient to fill up the gaps left by those men who have been killed, wounded, or sent to hospital. They do   nothing to relieve the wearied troops who, bodily fit, are yet exhausted in energy, homesick, and tired of a war which appears to drag on indefi- nitely without result. And the officers are as weary of the whole business as the men. Why is it that all our camps and barracks are not full of men being trained in order to provide relief for their comrades at the front? Why is it that there are not large forces of Yeomanry being trained a...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FALLACIES ABOUT BRAIN WORK. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

FALLACIES ABOUT BRAIN WORK.   Mr. William Matthews, writing in a Philadel-   phia paper, declares that nine-tenths of the al-   leged breakdowns from excessive brain work   are due to other causes. The truth is, he says,   that no organ of the body is tougher than the   brain. Hard work alone, pure and simple—apart   from anxieties and fear, from forced or volun- tary stinting of the body's needed supply of food   or sleep and the mind's need of social intercourse   —does far more to invigorate the brain than   to lessen its strength; does more to prolong life than to cut or fray its thread. It is the rarest thing in the world for a man to think himself to death, unless his thoughts run for many years in a monotonous rut—which is detrimental to vigor as a monotonous diet to the digestive functions—or unless his thoughts relate to something very painful, i...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A NEW AIR SHIP. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 21 December 1901

A NEW AIR SHIP. M. Severo arrived in Paris about six weeks ago from the Brazils to navigate a new air ship of his invention, which is quite ready on paper, and with which, when completed in actual fact, he hopes to work wonders. The vessel is at the pre- sent moment being built in Paris, and may be finished by the end of this month. M. Severo has already mapped out the aerial journey which he proposes to accomplish. He will start from grounds situated near the south-western boundary of Paris, just within the limits of the city. Thence he intends, or hopes, to travel due north right over the town, alighting eventually on Mont- martre-hill, on the summit of which stands the basilica of the Sacred Heart. After pausing there awhile M. Severo proposes to sail off again, this time selecting a circuitous course. Directing his ship eastwards, he will follow the line of the for- tifications of Paris, thus returning to his starting place by a wide semi-circular sweep, via La Vil- lette and Vi...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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