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Elephind.com contains 258,172 items from Wagga Wagga Express, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE THEATRICAL MINX. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

THE THEATRICAL MINX. We have some few good actresses, and many whose merits are lauded to the skies, but who in reality are never likely to play better than every ninety nine out of every hundred governesses would, were tliey given a dozen elementary lessons. The stage is infested with these young women. As a rule tuey have no experience, and no talent to make up for the want of it. If they can scrape together a little money, or if they can find some idiot to to supply tliem with the needful amount, tliey burst forth at once as Manageresses, or if not, as the heroines of some play that has been written for them, or of some old standard comedy or drama. Man Is a poor weak creature when he is confronted with a pretty face, and if the pretty face only smiles on liim he becomes a helpless jackass. These pretty minxes — for they generally are pretty — are good-naturally puffed by the critics, not- from any base or mercenary motives, but simply because the writers are of the feeble sex te...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LITTLE WOMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

LITTLE WOMEN. It may be frankly averred that the self assertion of many a little woman is delightful neither to her husband nor to anyone else. She may uot snap and suarl at }rou as she does at him, and she may not insinuate that you are a fool jus rIip niicrlif, rln if trnu wtaiv* iviata/J fn her, but she will probably approach you with more or less of a defiant air. As she draws nigh unto your presence she will perk up her head, just as if she desired to sniff the pure atmosphere or to show her contempt for everything beneath a height from the ground of some four feet. Then she will strut, rather than walk, and talk in the loudest of voices, as if her intention was to convey to you the impression, 'you see that I am small, but I am not defence less, and if you imagine that I will submit to be imposed upon you are much mistaken.' When you get into conversation with her you discover that she is very loquacious and a very learned party — in lier own opinion — and you discover also th...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DIRTY DIDACTICS. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

DIRTY DIDACTICS. j It is desirable that decent folk should from time to time take up their testi mony against the various series of prurient elaborations which, under the disguise of moral essays, expound social vices, real, imagined, and fabricated, i now in one, now in another, of our I weekly guides to politics, fashion. j literature, and morality. | There exists in human beings an i instinct of curiosity, not necessarily j vice, but inclined to exercise itself on i matters belonging to the temptations of : vice, and forming in itself one of the ; great dangers of the young. Supremely ! unlovely as it is — in some extremes ; almost more unlovely than vice itself — ' it is able to exist in a religious and even otherwise holy atmosphere, and minds conscious of rectitude, defiling them selves with it, can mistake it for virtue. Its ill eflects operate in counter direc tions, for, while it frequently leads, as might naturally be expected, to the practice of the corruptions upon which...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW RAISINS ARE PREPARED. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

HOW RAISINS ARE PREPARED. I A strip of land bordering the Mediter ranean, somewhat less than one hundred miles in length, and in width not ex ceeding five or six, is the raisinpro ducing territory of Spain. Beyond these boundaries the Muscatel grape, from which the raisin is principally pro duced, may grow and thrive abundantly but the fruit must go to the market or wine-press. When the grape begins to ripen in August the farmer carefully inspects the fruit as it lies ou the warm dry soil, and one by one clips the clusters as they reach perfection, In almost all vineyards slants of masonry are prepared looking like unglazed hotbeds, aud covered with fine pebbles, on which the fruit is exposed to dry. But the small proprietor prefers not to carry his grapes so far. It is better, he thinks, to deposit them nearer at hand, where there is less danger of bruising, and where bees and wasps are less likely to find them. Day by day the cut branches are examined and turned, till tliey are su...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ENJOYING LIFE. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

ENJOYING LIFE. Unless the stories of the 'merry England ' of old are utterly fabulous, our ancestors understood the art of enjoying themsolves better than we do. We may sneer at the ancient sports and pastimes as coarse aud rough, but there certainly seems no doubt that the actors in them thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Perhaps the artificial mode of life we lead now prevents our enjoy ing ourselves iu as hearty a manner as did our forefathers, who worked their brains less aud their bodies more, lived more in the open air, and lived more slowly. Truly it is ' the pace that kills.' Life centuries ago must have been such a much quieter affair than it is now. Of course, if you were in a high station, or in the service of a man in high station, there was always an un certainty regarding the manner of your ending. You might die in your bed, but the chances were tolerably even that you made your exit on a scaffold oi from a prison. Still people in those days were doubtless accustomed to th...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHURCH AND THE STAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

CHURCH AND THE STAGE. The stage was displayed upon the table at the recent Church Congress in the awesome presence of the three thousand ecclesiastics as an abandoned, though in some respects interesting, scapegrace. ' He had been a very bad boy,' they said, ' but there was hope for him, aud if he would be very good for tlie future he should have lots of sugar-plums.' And so he was cast upon the world again, and left to ' reform ' himself, and to trace out for himself the paths of virtue and honour. He was to fight a battle single-handed and in Ins own way which properly belonged to others. He was to do penance to please his patrons, aud starve to gain their victory. The mission of the actor is a high and noble one, but it is a profession by wliich he has to earn his bread. The mission of tlie minister of the gospel is doubtless far higher and nobler, but in some respects the purposes of the two aie identical, and so far their labours should be united. ' But,' says the preacher to h...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE VENTILATION OF BEDROOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

THE VENTILATION OF BED BOOMS. Tjieiu; are few bedrooms, remarks the Lancet, iu which it is perfectly safe to pass the night without something more than ordinary precautions to secure an inflow of fresh air. Every sleeping apartment should, of course, have a fireplace with au open chimney, and in cold weather it is well if the grate con tains a small fire, at least enough to create an upcast current and carry off the vitiated air of the room. In all such crises, however, when a fire is used it is necessary to see that the air drawn into the room comes from the outside of the house. By a facile mistake it is possible to place the occupant of a bed room with a fire in a closed house in a direct current of foul air drawn from all parts, of the establishment. Summer and winter, with or without the use of fires, it is well to have a free ingress for pure air. This should be the ventilator's first concern. Foul air will find an exit if pure air is admitted in sufficient quantity, but it is...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
QUARRELSOMENESS. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

QUARRELSOMENESS. A genius for quarrelling is as distinctly a gift of nature as the faculty of being a, good hater, aud both the one aud the other are susceptible of great improve ment by cultivation. A quarrelsome man is a continual source of dread to his friends. Everyone hates him, and yet, paradox though it seem, the quarrelsome man commands a certain respect and deference. His temper may not be a blessing to him, in a moral point of view, but in practical life he always gains his own ends with less opposition than falls to the lot of his neighbours. Men are afraid, and look askant at him, murmuring 'fmnum habet in corna.' He reckons up at night the distinct slights wliich have been offered him during the day, and, choosing the most hopeful, cherishes it as a casus belli. The perfect type of a quarrelsome inind must quarrel on principle, and lose no oppoitunity of gathering fuel to aid his fire. He gives the best years of life to some petty grudge, and after three or four decades...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

ggr Competition is the Soul of Trade ! JOSEPH'S FANCY REPOSITORY (LATE RAPHAEL'S), OPPOSITE MASONIC HALL. Prom this date until further notice 20 PER CENT. DISCOUNT will be allowed off the PLAIN FIGURE MARKED PRICES on all Cash Purchases. This deduction will reduce the prices to Wholesale Cost, and, in many instances, to Less than Wholesale Cost. T- . S . J O S B I* H s WATCHMAKER, JEWELLER, AND OPTICIAN, begs to state that this announcement is perfectly Bona Fide, and :is the Stock is vety large and comprehensive, presents au excellent opportunity to tiose lesnous of making the purchases customary during the Christmas i Season o OR SILVER WATCHES, JEWELLERY, CLOCKS TABLE CUTLERY, BOOKS, STATIONERY, WORK-BOXES, D^SKS, VASES, CONCERTINAS, VIOLINS, FLUTES, SEWING : MACHINES, TOBACCO, CIGARS, GUNS, REVOLVERS, PER* UMEltt , PICTURES, ALBUMS, MEERSCHAUM AND BRIAR PIPES, &c., &c,, &c. FITZMAURICE-STREET. November 30th, 1878. L . s. J O S B P XX, WHOLESALE WINE AND S...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE ROMAN ACCORDING TO SHAKESPEARE. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

THE ROMAN ACCORDING TO SHAKESPEARE. Shakkspeahk's delineations of Roman characters are almost perfect. His knowledge of historical detail was not so accurate as that of his great content- j porary, Ben Jonson. Cicero's speaking Greek in the popular assembly, and the j description oi tue treatment ot a senator by Caesar, are not in keeping with j 'historical colouring.' But, notwith standing this, we have only to read his four Roman plays in order to feel that we have presented to us, living or dying men, in prosperous or decaying Rome, In Coriolanus we are carried iuto the very centre of the contending classes of early Rome. It brings be fore us the conflicts of the Plebeians with the Patricians, and the develop ment of the Republic. Shakespeare paints Julius Cd'sar in the midst of Rome's glory, but yet in the midst of superstitious omens. Here we have the last futile efforts of the Republic fighting against the new love — the monarcbial form of polity. In A ntony and Cleopatra the ...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE CONSERVATION OF FORESTS. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

THE CONSERVATION OF FORESTS. There are few subjects on which people are slower to learn from the teachings of experience than in the matter of the destruction of forests. France, Spain, and Italy have suffered seriously from this interference with the natural storage of rainfall 1 whole districts have been rendered Darren winch were formerly fertile, owing to the wholesale destruc tion of trees. In India, as we are daily discovering to our cost, the wasteful cutting down of timber without proper replacement has largely contributed to those dangerous alternations of flood aud drought, drought and flood, which have | so much to do with the occurrence of ; famines. In some districts the rainfall lias decreased not less than 30 per cent, during the last twenty-five years, owing, it is believed, to this cause. In Australia the same effects are being observed, and the result of the denudation of the hill-sides :i: without any attempt whatever at re plantation will be felt more and more as...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST LADY GOOCH. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST LADY GOOCH. At Marlborough-strcet Police Court, on the 13th November, before Mi'. Newton, Annie Louisa Lady Gooch and Mi's. Ann Walker appeared to answer to a summons charging them with having, at the Grosvenor Hotel, unlawfully combined, conspired, con federated, and agreed together to palm off on Sir Francis Robert Sherlock Lambert Gooch, of Benacre Hall, Wan ford, Suffolk, aud 42 Charles-street, Berkeley-square, as his own child, a strange child, with intent to defraud and deceive. Lady Gooch entered the court accompanied by Mr. Sydney Gedge, the solicitor who instructs Mr. Clarke for the defence. Her ladyship who was deeply veiled, was accommo dated withh a seat at the solicitors' table. The defeudant Walker was similarly accommodated. On the case being called, Mr. George Lewis said : I appear on behalf of Sir Francis Gooch to lay before your worships certain facts, with a view to your arriving at a determination as to whether an in formation which has bee...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WEAK BRETHREN. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

WEAK BRETHREN. Tue undergraduate who invented the text ' Beware of weak brethren ' gave advice which was at least as valuable, though not quite as apostolic in its sanction, as he supposed. Like most good counsel, the maxim is a very hard one to put into practice. Weak brethren are the scourge and torment of every cause which has the slightest power of making converts. It is fortunate that their very weakuess makes them readily gravitate to the nearest convenient centre of opinion, so that they are tolerably well distributed among all sects and parties. If they have a tendency to drift to one side more than auother, it is to the side of novelty in religion, politics, literature, and senti ment. Anyone who considered their nature dispassionately would expect to find weak brethren disposed to shelter themselves under the shadow of things that are old and well established. Their fluttering restlessness, on the other hand, is like that of newly fledged birds. Something prompts them to l...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE VIEW OF MATRIMONY. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

ONE VIEW OF MATRIMONY. I There is one portion of our Church service which is of peculiar interest even to the non-religious portion of the community, particularly to marriage able maidens and to some of the few young men who aspire to wed in these celibate days. This interesting service is that for the ' solemnisation of matri mony.' What married woman does not remember a shy, secret perusal of that part of her Prayer-Book previous to the happy day '? And how many maidens of advenced age can truthfully disclaim a similar recollection, although the need for knowledge on the subject has never come '? The wonder is, that, even amongst religious people, as a rule, the service, with its vows aud its adjurations, passes from the memory and from the thoughts, and is only remembered when it is again heard, as performed ouev friends ; or, when, as too often happens, its vows are broken. In listening to the solemn words, after years of matrimony, regrets must arise in the minds even of the be...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AUSTRALIAN FRUITS FOR ENGLAND. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

AUSTRALIAN FRUITS FOR ENGLAND. A fine display of fruits from Australia, principally pears and apples, with a few grapes, and cherries, peaches, and other 'stone fruits,' has attracted consider able attention at the Paris Exhibition. Though inadvertently placed nearly at the bottom of the hold of the ship in which they were forwarded from Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide to London, and consequently subjected to considerable delay and to unnecessary risk of injury before tliey were finally transhipped and sent on to Paris, these fruits arrived in good condition, and their size and fine quality have excited the admiration of visitors from all parts of the world. This success has led to the proposal that the. produce of the orchards and the fruit-gardens of the southern portion of tlie Empire should be more generally brought within reach of the less favoured lands in the north. Already we have received large quantities of delicate fruits ill a fresh state, as well as preserved in several...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE BELLS OF ST. PAUL'S. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

THE BELLS OF J3T. PAUL'S. Although the woid 'dedication,' in lieu of ' benediction,' was used in the formula of the service on November 1, at St Paul's Cathedral, the ceremony which drew together so large an asse mbly as literally to throng the vast interior was, to all intents ana purposes, a blessing of the bells. Previous to the gathering of the clergy aud the Dean's guests in the belfry, Canon Provah, as the preacher in rotation, delivered a sermon from the pulpit at the junction of the choir and the transept, to a congregation most.of whom were beyond reach of his voice. The Bishop of London, Bishop ' Claughton, Dean Church, Canon Gregory, and others, proceeded to the campanile, which is the northernmost of the two towers be longing to the west front of the basilica. That Wren gave liis utmost thought and skill to the construction of these classic turrets, intending them to serve as dis pensers of souud, is a fact now well established ; for nothing can be plainer than that the ...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A SUBSTITUTE FOR GUTTAPERCHA. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

A SUBSTITUTE FOR GUTTA PERCHA. At one of the late scientific meetings at Paris mention was made of a sub stance having many of the character istics of india-rubber and gutta-percha, but which is comparatively new to botanists. It is called Balata, and is the milky sap of the Bully-tree, wliich flourishes on the banks of the Amazon and Orinoco in South America. The operation of obtaining the gum Is similar in every respect to that em ployed to procure the two before mentioned ingredients, that is to say, making an incision in the bark and allowing the sap to ooze out and either coagulate iu a lump or flow slowly over a clay form so as to produce what is termed a bottle, or any other pattern which may be desired. The new sub stance resembles gutta-percha so closely in its general properties that much of it is shipped from Guiana and sold yearly for that article, although it lias many qualities superior to gutta percha. It is tasteless, gives out an agreeable odour on being warmed, may...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DIVORCES IN OLD TIMES AND NEW. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

DIVORCES IN OLD TIMES AND NEW. Divoitcii existed in all ages at Home, and was always a private act. For a long time it was not abused by the Romans, but toward the latter part of the Republic, and under tlie Empire, divorces became very common. Seneca notices this laxity of manners ; and Juvenal gives a remarkable instance of a Roman matron, who is said to have gone the round of eight husbands in five years. Ponipev divorced his wife 51 uci:i. Cicero speaks of Paula Valeria as being ready to serve her husband with notice of divorce on his return from his province. Cicero himself divorced his wife Terentia after living with her thirty years. The husband generally took the keys from his wife, put her out of his house, gave her back her dowry, and so dissolved the mar riage. This might be done in the wife's absence. Cicero divorced his wife Terentia by letter. The laws in the several Grecian States regarding divorce were different, and in some of them men were allowed to put away their...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOME FOE INCURABLE, CHILDREN. [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

HOME FOE INCURABLE CHILDREN. Passing along a row of houses in that pretty Loudou suburb, Maida Vale, my eye was cauglil by tbe above inscription on the door-plate of No. 33. It was such a pitifully suggestive name, that I could not resist the desire to make acquaintance with the inmates of such a home. Tlie idea of the home is to take in children certificated as incurable at any age, and keep tbein till they are sixteen, and so eligible for other institutions. A list is kept of candi dates, who are admitted as vacancies occur. I aui also told that the vacancy is not always caused by death, as might naturally be imagined, but that some times the little patients recover suffi ciently to be able to get out. Only the week before two boys had been thus happily dismissed, aud their places ?were vacant for a short time — -very short, without doubt. When the home was lirst started, imbecile patients were admitted; but the effects were unhappy, especially on the other poor little sufferers ;...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Wagga Wagga Express — 11 January 1879

LAND NOTES. ' Land Office.— The following selections were token up at tho local Land Office 011 Thursday laat Michael Donnelly 120a, county Wynyard, parish Comelnbob, on lieramhula run, commencing: ot the N.E. corner of portion 29, thence on tho W. by por tion 29 and a line 8. by about 60 chains, on the 6. by a lino G. ; on the G. by a line N. for about 70 chains, on tlie N. by a line W. of the reserve 531, and on the S. by portion 29 to the starting point ; Thomas Pitt 100a, county Wynyard, parish Corcinboh, on Beruui bulft run, commencing at the S. E. corner of portion 27, thence on the E. by a line S. for 00 chains, on the S. hy a line W., ou tho W. by a line N. to portion 27, on the N. to portion 27 to point of starting ; Charles H. King 320a, county Mitchell, parish Bullonbong, on Hanging Hock run, being measured portion 28, adjoin ing liis c.p. of 320a, made Jan. 23, 1873 ; Thomas Hcley 300a, county Wynyard, situated on the left bank of K.VAmba Creek, ou the Big Springs run, o...

Publication Title: Wagga Wagga Express
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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