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Elephind.com contains 12,833 items from Waynesburg Messenger, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

m\m# t r ¦"UJ ^J3Lj p IJittsfeai^ %)Mmmk, J. WOODWBU,.] [J. WU.BV-] [T. »!»#*»'• JOMfiPH WOODtVElX & CO. UtrORTBM AND Dgll^A IN FOREIGN AND imj0STIC HARDWIRE. Cor. of Second A Wood Streets, PITTSBURGH, PA. March 6, 1881—n» 39—6 mo. W. W- M»1RJ IJOHM a. DAVUOS. MAl|t & DAVISON , mr-^TEHS AKD UEdLBRa IN Saddlery, Carriage & Trunk HARDWARE AND TRIMMINGS, So. VfX WOOI> STREET, riTTSBUUGH, PA. March 6, 1861—no 38—ly. WM. r. BECK 1 [JAS. S. L1ZBAB. BBCA A L&ZBAR, 185 LIBERTY STREET, PITTSBURGH, PA. Wholesal Grocers and Dealers in Country Produce. ORDERS for Groceries, Pittsburgh Manufactures, Flour, Orain. tc, tflled at usual terms. C'tiNSlGNMEAH' iJ of Produce solicited. February 13, 1801—no 36. XwriLlAMSON " , MANUFiC-UBEB OV S EC I H. T S ASD DSALM Iff OEKfTS FURWISUIXG GOODS. 47, St. Clair Street, PITTTSBURGH, PA. Every description of Ladies, Gentlemen's, and family whig executed by hand or machine, uu the tmo nest notice. April 24,1861—ly. J...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 28 August 1861

NEWGQtrrrs. GEORGE HOSK1NSON a AS Just received from the Eastern Cities a large ¦lock of seasonable goods, among which uiuv be Krated Dress floods, Sresa Trimming* , AXnslin Delaines. Trench ding-hams, Barage Delaines. Domestic CHng-bams, Bleached BflCuslins, Brown Muslins, Cloths and Cassimeres, Fresh Family Groceries, Fish, Salt. Hardware, Qneensware, Bats and Caps, Boots and Shoes, &c, &.<^,; Tostt'thPr with a variety of NOTOINS. Customers and tile public geiwmlly are invited tocall.-ltrJ e.vainin^ his assortmeut of Goods. Sold cheap for cash, or country produce. GEOKGE UOSK1NSOA. Waynesburg, April 17—no 45. ILK. CAMPBELL, Having Just received a large stock oi * good» from the Eastern cities, which he in determined to sell as low as any oilier establishment in Waynesburg, for cash or aood pr«(Iiice, consisting in goods ofthe following: XXR."5T G-OO:0JS, Clothes, Casinieres, Buffalo, Cord, Cilia wis, Ticking Blankets, Fhmne.a, Lindseys, liriJIinjr, Ciuit...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Untitled Article [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

THE WAYNESBURG MESSENGER, PUBLISHED BY JOKES & Jsmrixo-as, WAYNESBURG, GREENE COUNTY, PA. tailsi 8uBSCBiPTie/N.—$1 50 in advance; 81 75 at the expiration of six months; 82 (10 within the year; $2 50 after the expiration of the year. ADVERTISEMENTS inserted at 81 00 per square for three insertions, and 25 cents a square (breach additional insertion; (tea lines or less counted a square.) [p" A liberal deduction made to yearly advertisers. ©"J OB PRINTING, of all kinds, executed in theses •tyle, and on reasonable terras, at the "Messenger" Job office. . JJj =- Puhlicatiou Rooms on east Main street, nearly opposite the Court House Square.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
r gtled f otirg. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

r gtled f otirg. TUB GREAT HAVE FAI/LEN FROM US ONE BY ONE." BY R. STOCKETT MATHEWS. No great men in a land of arts ! No statesmen in the midst of law ! It cannot be; there must be hearts Which still hold History in awe ! If recreant to their holy trust, And deaf to lofty calls of fame, Some voice would speak from saintly dust, And wake them to their country's shame! Our own—above all prize supreme, A freedom won by common blood ! The patriot's fact—the poel'B dream—The highest reach of human good ! A nation in the largest light, Whose codes of earth and heaven blend, To sanctity the ruler's might, And make the law the poor man's friend '. She must own some one yet unheard, Whose will may bid the tempest "Cease," To speak some just, commanding word, Fraught with the very balm of peace ! Some earnest mind, as fair, as broad, As ever shaped the ages past, Strong by communing oft #iih God, And in his mould of wisdom cast ! Some man, undwarfed by selfish life, Born from the-trav...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
pktllastiras ^eafcmg. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

pktllastiras ^eafcmg. Infirmities of the Great. Handel, Milton, and Delile^ were blind ; Lucretius, Taseo, Swu 't, Cowper, Rosseru, ana Chatterton, are melancholy cases ot insanity. Kiehelieu had occasional attacks of insanity, in which he fancied himself a lior.se he would prance around the billiard table, neighing, kicking out his servants,-and making a great noise, until, exhausted by fatigue, he suffered himself to be put to bed " and well covered. On awaking, he remembered nothing that had passed. Shelly had hallucinations. Benardin St. Pierre, while writing one of his works was 'attacked by a strange illness.'—Lights flashed before his eyes; objects appeared double and in motion ; he imagined all the passers by to be his enemies.— Heine died ot a chronic disease of the spine. Metastatio early suffered from nervous affections. Moliere was liable to convulsions.— Paganiui was cataleptic at tour years old. Mozart died of water on the brain.— Beethoven was bizarre, irritable...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Romantic Adventure. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Romantic Adventure. A very romantic adventure is related in the New York papers. A young girl of thirteen years, of respectable parentage in the city of Dublin, Ireland, fell in love with a vcuth. of seventeen, of the same p lace. He came to America in the capacity of a ship carpenter. She followed, in search of him. Her subsequent history is thus told in the New York Journal of Commerce ot; Saturday : — " She shipped as cabin boy on board of a vessel at Liverpool , and made several voyages ii. that capacity. After spending two years in this way, she shipped as a deck hand oti uoard thu ship Resolute, in which vessel she made her last voyage, but had never succeeded in finding her lover. Paring these three years her sex was not discovered, and probably would not have been for some time hence, had she not refused to treat, the second tiro*, a party of sailors with who n she was drinking at the Water Street Saloon on Thursdajr ^evenjog. One ot these men becoming-*ngry 0L her r...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Arrest of Mayor^erret. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

The Arrest of Mayor^erret. The telegraph has alreacajrintormed us of J. G. Berret, Mayor of Washington city, and ot his having been taken to Fort Laytayette. His arrest produced considerable excitement but no surprise, it having been previously expected. He had been made, ex officio, a member of the new Board of Police Commissioners, and on entering into office it was necessary for him to take the oath of allegiance to the gov-. ernment. This he refused to do, on the sole ground, as alleged by him, that having been made an ex officio member of the Board, i^ was not necessary, as the same oath which he took when elected Mayor applied to all cases in which he was called upon to setve the public. The government, however, did not seem to under™ stand the punctilio, and ordered his arrest, and on Sunday he was conveyed to Fort Layfayette by order of Secretary Cameron. Before leaving Washington the officers searched his residence, but nothing was found to implicate him with the rebe...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Melancholy End. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Melancholy End. A young man named Pratt, about eighteen years of age, and Miss Vanderworker, only sixteen years old, who were uncle and niece, eloped from Rome, in June last, and went to New Ashford, Berkshire countv, Massachusetts, about ten miles from ' Pittsfield, where they were married. A horrible tragedy, the result ot this early clandestine marriage, occurred in that village on Monday last—The father of the girl, who had learned of their whereabouts, started in pursuit of the couple, and arrived in New Ashtord on the fatal day, declaring he would have his daughter. She saw him coming to the heuse, and went up stairs, and in five minutes afterwards the youthful and misguided couple were found with their throats cut, and so closely clasped in each other's arms, that three men could scarcely separate them. The girl died immediately, and the husband lingers with little prospect of recovery.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Something about the Rebel Generals. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Something about the Rebel Generals. Some particulars, in the nature of a biographical notice, of the rebel Generals, will be of interest just now. General Samuel Cooper is the senior officer. This gentleman was born in Delaware county, New York, and was sent to the Military Academy, where he graduated in 1817. He was soon placed on staff duty, generally at Washington; was Military Secretary of Mr. Poinsett; Chief Clerk of the War Department, then Aid to General McComb, General-in-Chief of the army, and subsequently an Assistant Adjutant General. In this bureau, by personal and political influence, he went through the various grades till, on the death of General Roger Jones, he became Adjutant General, which place he resigned last spring. General Cooper married Miss Mason, a sister of ex-Senator Mason, of Virginia. His son-in-law, Frank Wheaton, now Colonel of the Second Rhode Island Regiment, was appointed a Lieutenant in the First Cavalry, where he remained until transferred ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Gallant Irish Brigade, [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Gallant Irish Brigade, We learn from the best authority, says the New York "Trioune," that a new Irish Brigade, 5,000 strong at least, is to be immediate organized in this city, the command of which will be tendered to Gen. James Shields. The 1st Regiment of the*brigade is now forming under the gallant Lieut.-Col. Robert Nugent, of the 69th, and will be known as the 69th Volunteers. Already companies from Philadelphia, Boston, Cleveland, and other cities have pledged themselves "to press forward in this new and brilliant movement, which speaks volumes for the generous loyalty and unconquerable spirit of our adopted citizens. The Irish spirit of the North is fairly aroused, and thousands are ready to obliterate the sad memories of the first engagement in which the green flag waved gloriously beside the Stars and Stripes. In view of this organization, Captain Thomas Francis Meagher will decline ;ihe high position offered him by Major-Gen. Frement, and once more take his pl...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Another Flelit in Roane County. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Another Flelit in Roane County. A gentleman who arrived at Wheeling on Wednesday lrom Roane county, brings intelligence of another fight between the Union men and secessionists, at Spencer, the county seat. The Union men again took refuge in the Court House, and maintained their position, the rebels again abandoning the idea of capturing or killing them, as an undertaking of a little too dangerous character. Two of the seceshes were killed.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
PEN AND SCISSORS. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

PEN AND SCISSORS. GEN. MCCLELLAN.—Mr. Willis writes to the "Home Journal" that a distinguished civillian who had called upon Gen. Mc-Clellan on some matteriM importance, concluded his visit b y a gWfcral comment or two on the state of affairs, venturing a question, at last, as to what McClellan thought of our army's probable recovery from the late defeat. " I don't think, musingly replied the hero of Western Virginia, "that they will whip us again; but, it they do, there will be two men left dead on the field—I shall be one, and Lander will be the other." FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT.—A frightful accident occurred the other day in Spring township, Crawford county, through which, a young man named Aaron Ward, son of a widow woman residing in Crossingville, lost his life. A number of young people lrom the neighborhood were enjoying themselves at a social pic-nic, and a swing which they had put up for the occasion having become entangled in some way, Ward undertook to ascend the tree from ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
JJtfos of ijjc gag. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

JJtfos of ijjc gag. Fortress Monroe Items. FORTRESS MONROE, Aug. 23.—General's Wool and Butler have spent part of the day at the Rip Raps, experimenting with Sawyer's Gun. The second shell fired burst in the Confederate camp at Sewalls Point", broke down the flag staff and scattered the rebels like chaff. A propeller, , which was about landing troops at the Point, put back toward Norliolk. The whole affair was witnessed from the Newport News steamer. Grand reviews have to-day been held at Newport News and Camp Hamilton. Col. Ward#op has taken command of the Naval Brigade. The gun boat Seminole has arrived from the blockade off Charleston. She brought up as a prize the schooner Albion, formerly the Wilmington pilot boat, from Cardenas, with a cargo of sugar, coffee, fruits and segars. When taken she was sailing under English colors. The captain and nearly all the hands were drunk. She had run the blockade off Wilmington. The Seminole has overhauled several vessels showing Engli...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Union Volunteers Shot. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Union Volunteers Shot. Two Union volunteers, named J. H. D6bolt and F. Brooks, residents respectively et Masontown and New Salem, Fayette county, were shot the other day while returning from Bulltown, in North-Western Virginia, whither they had been with despatches for the commander of the federal troops' at that point. It appears that on their return from Bulltow n, they were fired upon by a party of secessionists, concealed in the woods. Debolt received two bullets, one in the head and the other in the back. He had sufficient strength to shout to Brooks to avenge his death, and then dropping from his horse expired. The horse was also shot, and fell dead near where his master lay. Brooks received two wounds, one in the side and the other in the shoulder, but succeeded in making his way to camp on horseback.— He was not, at last accounts expected to recover. A detachment waa sent from the camp to the scan* of the attack, and De-< bol& body recovered. It waa cent...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
A Fact for Business Melt. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

A Fact for Business Melt. If you wish to sell more goods this year than you ever did before, advertise more. The unparalelled success ot those merchants and traders who have kept their business and their goods before the people is a lesson not to be disregarded by any one who depends upon public patronage for a living. The best customers are those who find out what they want before they leave home, and these are the ones who invariably look in the newspaper to see where the article is to be found. If you want anything whatever that you do not know where to find, or do not choose to run after, advertise your wants, and ninetysnine times in a hundred you will be gladly served at your door, far cheaper and hetter than by any other known pro1 cess. The newspaper is the established medium of exchange between mind and mind, in regard to nearly all the wants of life, and its usefulness is rapidly extending among all classes. Every body reads the newspaper, rich and poor, high and |ow...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Rev. Dr. Spring's Marriage. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Rev. Dr. Spring's Marriage. ihe recent marriage ot Kev. Ur. opnng is alluded to as follows by the New York correspondent ot the Boston Journal . ¦ — Some time since I wrote you of the proposed marriage of Rev. Dr. Spring. • The event came off' in the chapel of the Brick Church on Thursday last, in the presence of a small co . mpany of visitors. The affair has created much talk. The Doctor is well on to eighty. He is quite^arfrm and his sight is poor. The lady brioVls sixty* five, and is a maiden. Mrs. Spring has not been dead quite a year, and in New York it is regarded as quite an impropriety for a widower not to wait at least one year. In this marriage quite a little romance is blended. The lady has a fortune ofs|i300, 000 in her own right. She has long resided with her uncle, one of the most benevolent men in the city, and the lady is reported to say that it has always been her great desire to become Mrs. Gardner Spring. The bride and bridegroom lett the chapel and at once ...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Shocking Death of a Lady. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Shocking Death of a Lady. The wife of Dr. Brodhurst, a London physician, has met death in much the same horrible manner as the wile ot Professor Longfellow. The doctor left her writing a note in the drawing room, but was recalled by loud cries of " I'm on tire!"- He rushed down and found his wife in the middle of the drawing-room, enveloped in flames. Her clothes were entirely consume ed, and the furniture near her was on fire. She had on a white muslin dress. She did not seem to have lost her presence of mind, for she requested the rug to be rolled around her, and the bell to be rung for the servants, which he did, and extinguish" ed the flames about the upper part of her person. Immediately the bell was rung, three servants rushed in, and he believed the reason ot their being so near the dour was because his wife had rung the bell before for prayers. Unfortunately, she had one of those crinolines made of steel hoops. Every means was tried to extinguish the fire about and und...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
The Rebels V» Undrawing. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

The Rebels V» Undrawing. The War Department has iniormation which leads to the belief that the rebels have withdrawn a mile beyond Fairfax Court House, leaving only pickets in the village. The movement was made with such precip itation—it is said some of the sick died on the way—as to lead some to infer fri g ht as the cause. More probably it was intended either to lure us within some* ambuscades, or, preliminary to a concentration ot their forces on other points. It is reported that the rebel force at Leesburg is increasing, and consists of several thousand men, supported by artillery. Gep. Banks is near enough, however, to present serious shot-and-shell obstacles to crossing, even if the river were fordable, which will not be for a day or two yet.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
For the Blockade. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

For the Blockade. Thirteen vessels, seven ot them steamers, carrying 2,000 men, are expected home within forty or fifty days, and will be added to the blockading force. The Brazil squadron, the frigate Congress and another is expected daily. The African squadron, three vessels, one the Mohican, equal to the Iroquois, should be here early in September. The China squadron a month later.

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
Remittees ot -Gen. Lyon. [Newspaper Article] — Waynesburg Messenger — 4 September 1861

Remittees ot -Gen. Lyon. We find the following in the Sf Louis Democrat:—"Physically, General Lyon was one ot those hardy, wiry men, that cuuld undergo any amount of fatigue.— He possed an iron will, and he was a man oj indomitable perseverance. He never knew what fear was. He cared Ititle for himself, ail for his country. At a time when it was asked by some of the .press, 'who is Gen. Lyon V a friend wrote to him requesting him to give the principal events in his history in order to answer the inquiry. "That is of no consequence,' answered Lyon; 'for myself I care nothing, but if 1 can be instrumental in putting down this wicked rebellion, I shall be perfectly satisfied. From a letter written by the General to his cousin, dated Springfield, July 21st, ten days before the Battle, I am permitted the following extract. It gives his views of the Manassas retreat, and the deep anxiety which filled his mind in regard to his own critical situation is indicated. He says: ' We are d...

Publication Title: Waynesburg Messenger
Source: Pennsylvania State University
Country/State of Publication: Pennsylvania, United States
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