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Elephind.com contains 658,475 items from Columbia Daily Spectator, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 3,057 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"HEALTH OF ROWING MEN." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

"HEALTH OF ROWING MEN." THE following interesting article from the Harvard Advocate is reproduced here for our readers, and will, we think, be of value in correcting the mistaken ideas prevalent, that rowing is detrimental to health. An article under this title appears in the Sanitarian for December. Its author, Dr. E. FI. Bradford, a Harvard graduate of '69, seems to have collected some valuable statistics. The greater part of these relate to Harvard oarsmen, and a synopsis of the principal facts may prove interesting. He begins with a statement of Dr. Richardson, who, in speaking of boat-racing, says : " I can scarcely overrate the dangers of those fierce competitive exercises which the world in general seems determined to applaud. The state of perfection arrived at is at best artificial, and sustainable for but a brief period." This view, however, does not seem to be warranted by the investigations of Dr. Morgan, of England, who carefully ascertained the condition of 294 Oxford a...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
DOWN WITH THE PROFESSORS! [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

DOWN WITH THE PROFESSORS! AN UNACADEMIC NATIONAL REUNION. [Translated from one of our German exchanges.] SCABBY.— (Studiosus Chiropodiae). "Students of Germany! Colleagues! Brothers! We are assembled, on this momentous occasion, to discuss no less important a question than the ' Abolition of all Professors,' as well as the means for inaugurating a sweeping change in our university ' conditions ' and other scholastic relations. Is there any one who wishes for the word ?" Crambeer. — (Stud. Cerevisise, in his 17th semester) " I beg leave to make a few remarks." Scabby. —" Crambeer has the floor." Crambeer. —" Our university conditions are, in fact, impracticable. The Professordom means nothing mom than a wholesale plundering of the student world. After we have ponied down for our academic fees, we have scarcely enough left for our customary thirP glasses a day. Caeterum censeo ! The professors must be all kicked off from their rostra." [Vigorous applause.] Sponge.— (Stud rerum Alienar...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CORRESPONDENCE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

CORRESPONDENCE. NOTE.— AII our readers are requesled to contribute lo this department. Letters should be on timely topics, written fairly and impartially, and should give the real name of a writer, in addition to his nom de plume. THE ABOLITION OF THE GOODWOOD CUP. Mr. Spectator : II is now well known among the undergraduates of the college, that at a recent meeting of the class of 79, it was voted to abolish the presentation of the Goodwood Cup, and invite future classes to do the same. On account of the important step which the majority, not of the class, but of those present at that meeting decided to take, because of the methods adopted- by them in order to accomplish their purpose, and in justice to those who were absent at the time, I beg that you will allow me to express in your paper the opinions entertained on this subject, not only by the writer, but also by many and perhaps even by a majority ot the class. In the first place, what reasons can be offered for abolishing the...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. THE Seniors will continue to read the " Agamemnon " of zEschylus with Dr. Drisler during the next term. The professor expects to deliver several lectures on Dr. Schliemann's recent discoveries, duringthe spring. Meanwhile, the catalogue mentions " Lectures on Greek Literature " as being a part of the course, —but this seems to be one of those subtle strokes of irony with which the trustees enliven the pages of that otherwise very dry pamphlet. PROF. PECK has arrived at Panama. The Semi-Annual. THE following speeches will be made at the SemiAnnual, the Bth inst.; — 1. Senior President's Address .. .Joseph M. Knapp. 2. Fanaticism, Joseph F. Crowed. 3. Party spirit in American Politics. .H. E. Gregory. 4. Grafting Holbrook Cushman. 5. Alexander Hamilton C. F. Holly, Jr. (Philolexian oration.) 6. Our American Republic E. M. Bliven. (Peithologian oration.) 7. Decay of Eloquence F. S. Barnum. (Barnard oration.) 8. Political Indifference C. F. Hurlburt. 9. Our Prison System ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

IN "THE MINES." ONE of 'Bo's brilliants has been guilty of the following conundrum : " What is the difference between a hog and you?" " One goes to waller in the mud, and the other goes to Waller in the office." THERE is a man in our institution named Charles Augustus Frederic Adolphus Herman . WIRES have been extended from the Wallace electric machine in the engine room to all the lecture rooms, to work the electric lights in the different magic lanterns. THE well-known and accomplished litterateur, Gen. Thomas M*C**l*y, met with a serious accident in the blow-pipe laboratory about two weeks since. A piece of coal deflagrated with considerable violence, and several pieces striking him in and about his classic eye, he came very near losing that useful organ. PROF. STENGEL is the happy possessor of a monkchick ! He obtained the beast at a bird store where it was not considered particularly valuable, and exhibited it to the students one day while they were attending lectures, ft is si...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD Amherst: The Olio of '79 has made its appearance. The Washburn Prize Exhibition is a thing of the past. Just 79 men in '79. The Brace Library of 2,000 volumes has been catalogued during vacation and is now ready for use. Mr. W. W. Sealborough of Cincinnati, has given the college 1150 with which to buy anatomical models. The base-ball nine have commenced practice in the gymnasium and will keep it up regularly until spring. The Ichnological cabinets have recently received several line slabs of bird tracks from Turner's Falls, valued at $lOO. The fourteenth annual gymnastic exhibition was held Saturday, Dec. 15th. Boston University:— A new Chickering.piano has been purchased and placed in the chapel. The Juniors take Geology this term, and the Sophomores Physics. Prof. Bolles is delivering a course ot lectures to the Seniors on Political Economy, in addition to the regular course. » Bowdoin:— The juniors are reading Undine. There is a great deal of bad feeling between...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. VERY many of our exchanges send us their papers with great irregularity, some, who have regularly received the SPECTATOR, and have often copied items of college news from its columns, have not yet sent any of their numbers to us. This is more than discourtesy, it is dishonesty. Though we are very well able to exist without our exchanges, common gentlemanliness requires that the courtesy of sending a paper regularly be answered, or that notice of the fact that a paper is not desired be given to its editors. In many cases this omission may be negligence, but we hope that all our delinquent colleagues will "brace up" at once. THE February number of the Atlantic Monthly — the first since its union with the Galaxy —opens with an able article from a writer on " The Cradle of the Human Race," who, appealing to history and every-day experience, declares the traditionary Aryan emigration from Central Asia westward to be a myth. Dorman B. Eaton considers the present status of c...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE third extra symphony concert of Mr. Theo. Thomas took place on Thursday the 24th inst. For the first time, the whole programme consisted of orchestral pieces. Haydn's symphony in E flat. Graedner's Capriccio, op. 4. Schumann's overture to the " Bride of Messina," and Beethoven's Seventh Symphony were rendered. The latter of course was the event of the concert, and justified the highest expectations. We cannot sufficiently impress on our readers the value and importance of these concerts from an educational point of view. One half of our public, that outside of college, need not to be urged to visit these musical treats. To our undergraduate readers however, we would say that nothing so stimulates for the necessary brainwork in college as a well rendered piece of music, and nowhere is a better selection of classical works to be heard than in Mr. Thomas' series of concerts. The fourth symphony concert occurs Saturday, the 2d inst. DR. LEOPOLD DAMROSCH'S second...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

THE LIBRARY. CYPRUS: Its ancient cities, tombs and temples. A narrative of researches and excavations during ten years' residence on that island. By Gen. L. P. di Cesnola. 8 vo., 456 pp., cloth, gilt top and uncut edges. Harper & Brothers, publishers, New York. Price, $7.50. General di Cesnola's book on Cyprus has been awaited with intense expectation by all lovers and students of antiquity. Now that it has appeared, we can safely say that their high hopes have not been disappointed. Beyond doubt, the work before us contains a revelation of a life hitherto unknown, and the great extent of which has recently been attested by Dr. Schliemann's excavations at Mycenae, Tiryns and Troy. We must reserve for another and more extended article, the discussion of the true place of the excavated treasures in the history of art and civilization, though we can hardly help believing that they belong to the period when the heroes of the Iliad fought and died. The record of Gen. di Cesno...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SHAVINGS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 1 February 1878

SHAVINGS. OH ! when will Freshmen change from green To some more brilliant hue ' Oh ! when will Sophomores cease to tell Professors what to do? Oh ! when will Juniors quit the girls And act like little men ? Oh ! when will Seniors all agree On class elections ? When ? —Rochester Campus. A THEOLOGUE was lately heard to utter the amphibolous expression that he thought Beecher was raising Hell in the estimation of a great many. " COME, come, young gentlemen, warm up to the exigencies of the occasion." (From a back seat.) — " Shall I fix the fire, professor?" JAMES BOS WELL, distinguished for his humor and power of repartee, was one day pleading at the Scotch bar before his father, Lord Anchinleck, who was at that time " Ordinary on the Bills." The testy old Senator becoming offended at something his son said, peevishly exclaimed, "Jamie, ye're an ass, man.' "Not exactly, my lord," answered the junior, " only a colt the foal of an ass."

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
Masthead [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

The Columbia Spectator. Published Semi-Monthly by the Students of Columbia College. VOL. 11. NEW YORK, FEBRUARY 15th, 1878. No. 10. Board of Editors, 1877-1878. FREDERICK W. HOLIES, '7B, Editor-in-Chief, J. FISCHER, '7B, S. of L. Managing Editor. J. W. SPALDING, '7B. C. H. CROW, '7B. H. G. PAINE, '79. W. B. PARSONS, JR.'79. C. D. STARR, 'BO S. of M. M. BENJAMIN, '7B S. of M. S. B. POND, '79, Secretary. TERMS. Per annum, in advance, - $2.00. Single copies, - - - - - - 1 5 cts ' Subscriptions by mail should be addressed to MR. WM. F. MORGAN, Treasurer, 634 Fifth Avenue, New York. Exchanges, contributions, and all other communications should be addressed to THE COLUMBIA SPECTATOR, Columbia College, N. Y.

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
CURRENT TOPICS. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

CURRENT TOPICS. ANOTHER fortnight has passed with few noteworthy events in the college routine, excepting, of course, Semi-Annual. Of the latter we speak so fully in other columns that we may fitly pass it over in this place. During the dull months of college-life, the position of editor of a college newspaper is decidedly unenviable. Indeed, the spectacle of such an unfortunate being, trying, for the life of himself, to evolve "items" from his fertile brain, if not from the reality of life, is a solemn warning to over-zealous, would-be editors. It is, moreover, a fact to be kept in mind- —be subscribers growling at irregularity—that none suffers so much from the latter evil as the editors ; and that, as long as editors are not excused from college duties, some irregularity will occur. This, once for all, by way, not of apology, but of explanation of such delinquencies. Besides, if growlers should themselves help our paper, by good contributions, much of the delay would disappear. T...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE MARKING SYSTEM. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

THE MARKING SYSTEM. NO. 3. "Custom is a violent and treacherous schoolmistress. She, by little and little, slily and unperceived, slips in the foot of her authority, but having by this gentle and humble beginning, with the aid of time, fixed and established it, she then unmasks a furious and tyrannic countenance, against which we have no more the courage nor the power so much as to lift up our eyes." — MONTAIGNE. THE Semi-Annual examination is past. Again we have in the returns posted on high additional evidence of the evils of the system. A few days before a friend said to me : "It's no use for me to study for this examination. If Ido remarkably well the professors will not give me credit for it, they always suspect cheating. I have found that it is impossible to escape from my past record. If I study hard one month my mark comes in just the same as the month before (like gas bills), or a little lower as a rule; and when I do not study so much but talk sweetly to them I stand ever ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
SEMI-ANNUAL, '78. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

SEMI-ANNUAL, '78. ON the morning of February Bth, Junius was surprised by an invitation from the editors of the SPECTATOR, to visit Semi-Annual as a reporter for the college newspaper. The reason assigned for this strange move on the part of the editors was, that they wanted the fair and impartial view of an average student on the festival, and as this would certainly be accompanied by some censure, they preferred an anonymous writer. Now, the real name of Junius has. after a century of search and study, not yet been found, and it would be according to the editorial wishes if another century of investigation should fail to disclose the real name of the writer of this article. Junius went as a friendly critic, and it is a friendly judgment which he renders in pronouncing the SemiAnnual of '7B a comparative failure. On the whole, it was inferior in every respect, excepting, perhaps, the quality of the music, to the similar festivals of '76 and '77. The blame for this is not to be laid...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
OUR EXCHANGES. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

OUR EXCHANGES. THE Queen S College Journal , from Canada, is a bright little paper, and contains some well-written articles. Here is an editorial which we give entire " A 'professor ' down in Prince Edward's Island has been telling the public that his experience in teaching boys has shown him that there is a dangerous tendency to cramming in order to pass examination, and that often when answers are given with parrot-like fidelity there is a plentiful lack of intelligent appreciation of the merits of the question asked. He says that he would prefer to see a boy giving a wrong answer which betrayed some thought, than one who gave a correct reply without understanding the matter in hand. This is very fine talk for the ' Professor' to indulge in, but it is the examination system in vogue that is at fault, not the boy. So long as marks are the standard of excellence, the ambitious boy will address his energies to the getting of marks more than to the comprehension of the subject taught....

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
ABOUT COLLEGE. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

ABOUT COLLEGE. ABOUT three thousand dollars have as yet been subscribed by the Alumni for the purchase of the Strong Library. It is improbable that the wanting $12,000 will be obtained. WE regret to state that Prof. Burgess' recent utterance on Woman suffrage was, however unintentionally on his part, seriously misrepresented in our last, and has given occasion to a most unwarrantable notice in The Tribune. We shall return to this subject in our next. FIRE! Consinerable excitement was raised a few days since by the overturning of the large stove in the cloak-room. The live coals spread all over the floor, and for a few moments the buildings were in imminent danger; but this was fortunately averted by the prompt application of a snow bank. Of course, nobody knew how it happened, although a large crowd had gathered to see it fall over. WORK has already begun on the Columbiad, and the committee desire to get it out as soon as possible. It is requested that all students having interestin...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
IN "THE MINES." [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

IN "THE MINES." A MUCH higher average was obtained by the division of the second year class that were examined in blowpiping on Tuesday than by that examined on Monday. Of course there are a thousand ways in which this may be accounted for, but considering that the class was alphabetically divided and that the examinations were equally difficult it is perhaps worthy of notice that Monday was stormy and damp and that on Tuesday there was a strong west wind blowing and a cloudless sky. MUCH surprise has been produced by the difference of some of the examinations just passed, from those of last year. More than twenty men failed to pass the examination in analytical geometry held last February, where but five failed this year. The men of 'BO maintain that this is owing to the superior brightness of that class, but an impartial spirit compels us to state other causes. Undoubtedly the examination of 1878 was somewhat easier than that of 1877, but in addition to this, last year all the stu...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE COLLEGE WORLD [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

THE COLLEGE WORLD Amherst The so-called " scientific course " at Amherst seems to be a sham, and the Shident calls for its abolition. " The extending of the elective system through almost all the departments of instruction really puts the college on a different footing, gives it a different character." — Shident. Small libraries have been placed at the disposal of the students, engaging in some of the electives, by the professors of the departments. The Base Ball Association is making arrangements for next season's games, and is in correspondence with several colleges. No games have as yet been definitely decided upon, except a game with Harvard to be played June 12. Dolly Coleman Blake, of Boston, has bequeathed the college SI,OOO to found a scholarship. By the will of the late Charles Thayer Reed, of Cambridge, the col- lege will receive, on the death of the testator's wife, $2,500 to establish two scholarships of $1,250 each, to be called the " Reed Scholarships " in memory of hi...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
THE LIBRARY. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

THE LIBRARY. THE very important announcement is made, that the firms of James R. Osgood & Cos. and Hurd & Houghton, have consolidated into the firm of Houghton, Osgood & Cos., composed of Messrs. Henry O. Houghton, James R. Osgood and George T. Mifflin. The new firm will certainly be one of the foremost in the country, and beyond doubt the Boston firm, as the Harpers are in New York, and the Lippincotts in Philadelphia, The lists moreover, which are thus united, comprise, beyond doubt, the very best in American and Foreign Literature, with excellent editions of standard works. WE shall notice the first volume of Green's History of the English People in one of our next issues, and for the present content ourselves with stating that it is ready at the Harpers' for $2.50. As it is a standard work, the publication of which has been awaited with much interest by many of our readers ; it will doubtless have an immediate and ready sale. Music AND MUSICIA...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. [Newspaper Article] — Columbia Daily Spectator — 15 February 1878

MUSIC AND THE DRAMA. THE OPERA SEASON. AT last New York can again enjoy an opera season. For the next three weeks the Academy of Music bids fair to present, to the metropolitan public, a series of attractions unsurpassed of late years. As the great majority of our readers is of the music- loving and opera-going description, a brief reference to this important artistic event is imperatively demanded. The company, Mme. Pappenheim nad Mr. Adams, supported by Miss Adelaide Phillips, Mme. Rudersdorf and Miss Alexandre Human, is certainly a galaxy of " stars " of the first order : and the chorus and orchestra being under the direction of Mr. Max Maretzeck, can be relied on as equal, if not superior to those of former seasons. The operas to be presented are " The Huguenots " and "The Prophet " by Meyerbeer, " Fidelio" by Beethoven, "The Jewess" by Halvey, "Trovatore" by Verdi, and "Lohengrin, Tannhauser" and "Rienzi" by Wagner. The latter will be performed here for the first time in Americ...

Publication Title: Columbia Daily Spectator
Source: Columbia University
Country/State of Publication: New York, United States
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