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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 57 I IT IS OUR "WISH." I asked n little child one day, A child intent on joyous play, MMy little one: pray tell to me Your dearest wish ; what may it be?" The little one thought for a while, Then answered with a wishful smile; The thing I wish most of all Is to be big, like you and tall.' I asked a maiden sweet and fair. Of dreamy eyes and wavy hair; What would you wish, pray tell me true, That kindly fate should bring to you?" With timid mien and downcast eyes And blushes deep and gentle sighs, Her answer came: "All else above, I'd wish some faithful heart to love." I asked a mother, tried and blest, With babe asleep upon her breast; "Oh, mother fond, so proud and fair, What is thy inmost secret prayer?" She raised her calm and peaceful eyes, Madonna-like, up to the skies, "My dearest wish is this," said she, "That God may spare my child to me." Again, I asked a woman old, To whom the world seemed hard and cold ; "Pray tell me, 0 thou blest in years, What are t...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

tEsB53ESZSSSSm 58 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. of the assistance of Gorman priests in conducting the affairs of his diocese. No second intimation was necessary. Father Marty abandoned his original plans, and, with two companions, started for Indiana. This was in 1860. After a conference with the bishop he de termined that colonization was necessary to the success of the diocese. Possessed of a keen business sense, he went about ,the matter in a purely business manner. Father Marty purchased 7,000 acres of ground in Spencer County, a large portion of which was sold to colonists at prices and on terms that placed it within the reach of the poorest. The major part of the colonists came from Switzerland and Germany, and they proved to be clean, thrifty and in every way desirable accessions to the popula tion. It is a notable fact that Spencer and Dubois Counties, in the State of Indiana, were almost exclusively settled by Catholics, and this through the individual efforts of Father Marty. His z...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 59 colicky in his nature, and gruff and unyielding to the "white faces," always unbent before the kind manner and authoritative look of Dr. Marty. On two occasions when Sitting Bull was especially savage and obstreperous, and when he had threatened death to any man that came within his sight, Father Marty calmly entered the tent of the great chief and talked to him, to use an expressive phrase, "like a Dutch 1111010." The great influence that Father Marty possessed over the Indians was the means of protecting the white settlers on more than one occasion. In many of his transactions with the Indians ho acted under the authority 'of the United States Government, and it is a matter of record that the Govern ment at Washington has always recog nized and appreciated his services during Indian troubles. This was natural under the circumstances. Father Marty has taken his life in his hands often, and has advanced where many another man would have hesitated. In 1S79 the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

60 TEE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 1'i i . i) Tie Indian UlVocate Is a Review, published by the Benedictine Fathers of this Indian Territory, to plead the cause of the last remnants of the Indian tribes, and to give a history of their progress toward civilization. It will contain, from time to time, a general history of each tribe; their progress In education and religion; their occupa tions, industries, schools, etc., etc. Also, a history of our mis sions, statistics, and other interesting matter that can not be found In any other publication. The proceeds of this Review will be used for educating and converting the Indians of the Territory. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE, Sacred Heart Post Ofllce, Oklahoma Territory. Aitrovkd iiY Right Rev. THEO. MEERSCHAERT, Vicar ArosTouc of Oklahoma ani Indian Teriutoiiy. Subscriptions CO Cents per Year. Single Copies to Cents. JULY, 1894. EDITORIAL AND LOCAL. We clip the following from the Kansas City Catholic, with only one remark : The beautiful and truthful comm...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 61 least, the Adv.ooate mentions with special pride the four Indian pupils whose acting was simply superb. Next day, Rt. Rev. Meerschaert, with five of the Fathers, started for St. Gregory's Mission to bless a modest church, built recently by Rev. Father Savinian, in a settlement composed of Indian and German families. Their reception was hearty and primitive. The good Bishop was highly pleased and had a good word for each and every one. After Mass three settlers and one Indian wore confirmed. Of course, the blessing of a frame church (32x20) is a very insignificant event for the people in the East. But we are in Oklahoma, and in that part of it called the "Pott" country, and the rearing and setting aside for divine service of even so small a building is quite an event: so our good people think out here they came from all directions, in wagons, on horse back, on foot; from three, five, eight, and even fifteen miles' distance. So, also, does his Lordship think, f...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

(T 62 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. Prince Bismarck is credited with saying once: "We Germans fear nobody except God." Would to God that those words could not be challenge ! But unfortunately the spirit of unbelief is at work in Germany. The Grcnzbotc, of Leipzig, says: "The prussified German fears everybody, and is in dread of everything. When he is little he is afraid of the schoolmaster; when he is grown he is afraid of the owner or his superintendent; when he puts on a uniform he is afraid of the non-commissioned officer; later he is afraid of the police, the judge, the relator, his friends, his enemies, his customers, and his landlord. But what he fears not is God, for the official science of our universities tell him that He does not exist." OUR OWN. If 1 had known in the morning How wearily all the day The words unkind Would trouble my mind I said when I went away. I have been more careful, dearest, Nor given you heedless pain ; But we vex "our own" With look and tone We may never tak...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 63 The Church and the Indians are very deeply indebted to her successful estab lishment of her Indian congregation. She removed a reproach of four centuries standing from the Church and the Indians, and triumphantly indicated the Catholicity of her Church and the spiritual and mental capacity of her race. A QUAINT INDIAN LEGEND. ''Why do Indians paint their faces ?" I have asked that question of hundreds of red men and have received but one answer. Of all the tribes thatI have visited, but one has a legend accounting for the hideous decorations that are to be seen on the faces of Indians under all ceremonial circumstances. I was sitting at a campfire in a village of Jicarilla Apaches one night, listen ing to the stories and legends that were being told, when I propounded the old question again, hardly expecting even the usual expression of ignorance that hides so many of the thoughts of the Indians. To my surprise, however, 1 received the answer that I least ex ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

pwpw; iiwiirpm-ifcuaran nOTnmir i 64. THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. standing beside a stall of highty colored sweets, home-made candy in all sorts of primitive forms and colors, by a counter laden with the strong homespun cloth of the country, deep in the exam ination of sabots (wooden shoes) great and small, or of laces, silk handker chiefs, or cotton bandanas, piggy is there too, pushing his inquisitive nose into everything in a persistent, but by no means ill-natured way. Especially is he attracted bj' the preambulating variety shops, the owners of which have a clever way of reminding the family that the contents of the "shop," which is only a reversed umbrella filled with pins, needles, tape, buttons, with etceteras, is not his affair. A sharp turn of the umbrella brings the points of the frame nearer to the snout than he finds agreeable, and he withdraws for the time to a safe distance. But it is only to watch his opportunity. At the first favorable moment he makes a playful rush under ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 65 "Let his purse also be light," was the reply. The darknoss'deepened, the shadows gathered around. The mountain path became less and less distinct. "Let us wait here." They took shelter behind a booting crag that shut them in from the road. Darkness settled down while they waited; and there was yet no moon. A footstep was heard at last. Their hearts beat loud; it seemed almost as if the rushing river Gave, instead of blood, was surging in their veins. "Come, are rou ready?" The voice of the spoaker was tremb ling, and the reply unheard; but they started from their lair. It was only to re-enter it hastily. A flood of light lay across the path, and showed them the farmer in the midst of a goodly company. "His friends are accompanying him part of the way. Let us hasten for ward; we can intercept him at the gorge." Again all was dark, as they issued forth and followed their prey. From time to time the moon penetrated through the deep shade, and showed them the far...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

-v fnnrit-rmA",f vm "H'I""J " "' 'WK'Ul. "P" i 55 !TIZ? INDIAN ADVOCATE. those souls for whom he prayed were his companions and protectors on that fearful road. But he continued his interrogatory : "Some of your good friends came part of the way, at least, with you ?" "No ; it was late, and I would not let them do so. I knew the road to well to need guide or guard," was the farmer's reply. Ah, thought the priest again, how little did he suspect how much he need ed both guide and guard that night, or who they were who kept him company in that dread 'hour. "But you met some one, either com ing or going, between this and the village?" "Not a living soul," was the decided answer. The priest was convinced convinced and grateful. He had gained two souls to his flock, and the farmer's life was safe, thanks to the holy souls. This is not a legend, but an actual fact that took place in the neighborhood of Lourdes less than four years ago. So the venerable priest to whom it happened assured m...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

-S3 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 67 jJWwilT'iin Why The Willow Weeps. 'Twas the time when our dear Lord Jesus Had finished his life of love And tho voice of His Heavenly Father Was calling to him from above. And the cruel soldiers of Pilate Were searching with eager eye For something to scourge the Savior, Ere they led him forth to die: Now it chanced that there grew a willow, Not a willow like those we see, With sorrowful trailing branches, But a tall, young, graceful tree. Whose straight green branches pointed To the sky; and sages tell How the soldiers took them to scourge Him, For they served the purpose well. And all through that dreadful hour When tho blows fell thick and fast On the quivering flesh of Jesus, Till the blood flowed down at last. The willow drooped and saddened, Under the grief and pain, And trailed its long green branches Weeping down on the moistened plain. And all through the many ages That since have come and fled, The sorrowing weeping willow Has hung its saddened ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

qft.wv -'y '"Vf '" ' 68 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. ...,,11. i nmif.Jnlv--W will become weak and vacillating, the season for forming those habits which ought to regulate our lives will have gone by, and we shall go forth into the great arena of life irresolute in all our purposes, and incapable of being content in any situation. Discontentment is ingratitude to our Heavenly Father. He has placed us in the situation, which in His infinite wisdom He saw best, and even if it is not in the circle of wealth and distinc tion, yet it is a situation in which we may be happy. We have only to look about us in the world to see the wretch edness and misery of our fellow-beings. He who notices the fall of a sparrow is not regardless of our happiness. How ungrateful it is for us to murmur at His will; it is His paternal love and care which has provided all our wants and the blessings of life. "Contentment is better than riches." True happiness does not depend on great wealth and fame, but upon the faith...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

n iump m mwm mmmmwrw' tmi THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 69 punish his people by desecrating his grave when he should die. The whole business smacks of the style of the old inquisition, and the un fairness of it must shock and disgust all fair-minded Americans. Special to New York Times, June J). AN INDIAN GATHERING. From Vancouver comes the intelli gence that a gathering of Indians under the direction of the Roman Catholic missionaries will be held at St. Mary's mission in June, tho largest of the kind ever held in the Province. The Indians will come from all the Frazer river reserves, Squamish, Sechelt Cowlchan, Victoria, Naniamo, North Bend, Kara loops and other places. Particular honors' are to be paid Bishop Durien by tho Indians, a battery of ten cannon to be massed to herald his arrival. The Indians of British Columbia have made great progress in learning under the priests. There are several excellent brass bands among them, and two or three newspapers set up entirely in shorthand. Sho...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

70 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. industries in an exceedingly methodical, though crude way. The Navajo tribe has become somewhat civilized, and does not roam about as formerly. The tribe numbers 25,000, and has many villages scattered over the southern part of the territory. Phj'sically and mentally I regard this tribe of Indians as superior to any in North America. They are wonderfully clever at all kinds of industries, and there is nothing of the proverbial Indian slowness about them. They are in no way lazy, and are skillful, quick workers. They are adept silversmiths, and their work is both artistic and unique. The Navajo blankets are celebrated, and no tourist feels quite contented to leave our territory without one. The work of civilizing and evan gelizing the Indians is very gradual. It is a mistake to think one can trans form an Indian into an American in one generation. Mere education with out moral training based on religious training, is, according to the opinions of those who kno...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

w"yjErW'PWiyiTpTW,"'T"'''r'':'T' w- THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 71 'Jlje ;Aigel ofjpargatory. how many svi:i:t reminisckncks this titli: recalls to a christian mind. PURGATORY. So near the gate Of Heaven's encircling radiant wall. So near tha. gleams of glory fall, Upon the Souls in Justice thrall The captives wait. They wait until The mystic searching llame consumes Each fruit of ill, and sweet perfumes Of Purity's celestial blooms Their being fill. Ah, hear ye not The anguished echo of their cries? 'Tis borne on every breeze that sighs Its miserere to the skies "Pity our lot!" "Release! Kelease! From molten bars and flaming screen That glow a fiery mats between Soul-viewed and the vision seen In realms of peace." "We long to turn Unto the Sacred Heart's caress And His dear Mother's ; e'er to bless With Angel throngs, Love's tenderness In exile yearns. "True hearts on earth, Not tears, but charity's soft dew, Sweet alms of prayer, we beg of you, And Calvary's Sacrifice anew Our ransom's w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 July 1894

72 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. it. The holy sacraments of Christ and especially His holy flesh and blood in Holy Communion have implanted the germ of a glorious immortality in the human body and this germ springs into life and develops after this mortal life, when the body lies dormant in the grave. And what is the quality of the fruit, that springs from this seed in God's holy acre ? St. Paul has told us in simple but sublime words in the 15th Chapter of his first letter to the Corinthians : "The body is sown," he says, "in corruption, it shall rise in incorruption. It is sown in dishonor, it shall rise in glory ; it is sown in weakness, it shall rise in power. It is sown a natural body, it shall rise a spiritual body." There is no proportion seemingly be tween the natural grain of seed and its abundant and lovely fruit. Far less proportionate would then the corrupt, repulsive, lifeless, animal body of man as a seed appear compared to its fruit of an incorrupt, powerful, glorious, spiritu...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

The Indian Advocate. Devoted to the Interests of Indian Missions. Vol. VI. OCTOBER, 1894. No. 4. THE ROSARY. AN ARTICLE APPROPRIATE EOR THE MONTH OF Ol'TORER. I. One difficulty felt by our non-Catholic friends about Catholic devotions is, that they appear to them to be formal. A little time, then, may be well bestowed in showing the difference between forms and formality in prayer two very dis tinct things indeed. The month of October is the month of the Holy Rosary; and, as the Rosary appears to them about the most formal of devotions we will spend a column or two on this subject. First, then, a word about the formality. A prayer becomes formal, that is, heartless, and a matter of mere routine, when words are repeated without a corresponding act of the mind; when people say them in the sort of way a parrot would talk. This is saying them merely by rote; turning a wheel, as it were, round and round on its accustomed pivot, like the "prayer mills" in Thibet, of which travelers speak....

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

vf -,r " - Tftr "2 TP ' ?4 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. eloquent dissenting preacher, that his extempore address to heaven before his sermon was "the finest prayer that had ever been addressed .to a Bristol congregation." ii To come back to the Rosary. Our friends may say that we have not quoted the text according to their version, which runs: "use not vain repetitions, as the heathens do;" a text which they think condemns such repetitions as we make on our beads. "Fifty Hail Marys," say they, "divided by only five Our Fathers and Glorias. Is not this a vain repetition? No wonder you are obliged to have a string of beads, to count so many! What have you to say to this?" We answer: l)The text in the original Greek has no allusion whatever to conscious deliberate repetition. "Speak ing like a stammerer" is the accurate meaning, as was said just now. 2) It is much to be feared that here, as in other passages, they who professed to give to the people the pure and genuine Word of God, have "wres...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

mmmmmmmmmmmm THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. 75 its meaning gradually, like a flower. We sec at once its general purport and drift; but its many applications, and the way it adapts itself to various states of soul; its comforts, its warnings, its lessons; these come upon us, and stir and appeal to us, in proportion as we use it; that is, in proportion as we repeat it. So that at length we arrive, in our inquiry, at the conviction that instead of many repetitions of a prayer being formal, they do, indeed, impart fresh life and warmth, and reality of meaning, the oftener they are made. Nor must our objecting friends forget this also, that the very persons who use their beads most intelligently, and to whom the Rosary is a "reasonable service," are also in the habit of dwelling upon the meaning of the several words of a petition and ejaculation; during the time of their "meditation," or mental prayer. When we love a friend, we delight to dwell upon partic ular expressions he has used in conver sa...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 October 1894

76 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE. eel, always gliding off on one side or another: we must grasp our devotional thoughts firmly, and not lot them go. Now, when the words of a prayer are very well known, and often used, to say them slowly throughout the prayer is almost to invite distraction. When we prajr alone, indeed, we may occasionally pause, in order to appreciate the force or taste the sweetness of a particular expression. This is one of the special "Methods of prayer," laid down for us by masters of the spiritual life. But it turns vocal prayer into mental pray or, which is not our present subject; and is only possible when we enter into our chamber, and having shut the door pray to our Father in secret. The faculty of praying without weariness or distraction is a gift that has been given to Saints and saintly souls; or rather, it has been won by their persevering exertion, aided by Divine Grace. We hope for it hereafter; if we are so happy as to be admitted among those who rest not, da...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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