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Elephind.com contains 339 items from Abingdon Virginian, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 3 July 1863

POETRY. For the Virginian. I l_ove thee yet, Kentucky. I love thee yet, Kentucky, I love thine honor'd name ; I love thee for the glorious page Thou'st given the book of fame. Although thou'st stray'd, Kentucky, And early truths forget— With all thy faults, Kentucky, f m forc'd to love thee yet. I love to muse o'er times gone by, When reason "on her throne," E'er jealous of encroaching power, "Had marked thee for her own." Alas, for thee, Kentucky! Those days have pass'd away, And dark oppression dims the light Of thy once glorious day. Thy forest hills echo no more • The shouts of gallant men; Vandallic hordes in vain essay To 'wake the enliv'ning strain. Thy sunny fields that once were clad In summer's beauteous glow, Are trembling now beneath the tread Of a despot's hirling foe. Virginia stands with open hands And bids the welcome come, And while she has a tithe to give, Kentuckians have a home. Remember gallant Tennessee— The sister of thy heart — Her gallant sons so nobly fall ...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 10 July 1863

VOLUME 24. SttlW* The VntaiNiA.Nis published every Friday morn ing, at $4.00 per annum, if paid in advance, or within three months after subscribing, otherwise $4.50 will be charged. No subscription will be received for a less pe riod than six months, for which $2.00 will be \ charged. No subscription will be discontinued except at the discretion of the proprietors, until all arrear ages shall have been paid up. * . Any person procuring five responsible subscri bers, shall be entitled to a copy gratis. Terms of Advertising. One square of 10 lines or less, $1.00 for the first insertion, and 75 for each continuance. The number of insertions must be marked upon the margin, or the advertisement will be continued till forbidden, and charged accordingly. To those who advertise by the year, a liberal discount from the Tegular rates will be made. All dues to the office may be remitted by mail, i in good and available Bank notes, at the risk of , the Editors, the person remitting taking the ...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 10 July 1863

SKttgkn f irpmm. *-- "'> g ; - ■ ■ . ___—' BY COALE _c BARR. Friday, July 10, 1863. a_arts ; _ -tea , ■- ■'~.■■.- ■■ ,~^—t_-z Particular Notice. Not having time to call upon the subscri bers to the Virginian in this place and county, to collect dues, we hope they will call and pay as. We need the money. Our expenses are heavy and have to be met promptly io cash. Examine your receipts and see how the ac count stands. We hope our subscribers at other points will regard themselves as under some obliga tion to forward to us amount due on subscrip tions. Those who subscribed and paid for 6 months, will please renew their subscriptions by for warding amount for 6 months or longer, as they may prefer. Another Change. We have for several weeks been debating in our minds whether we should raise the "Virginian" to a living price, or continue at our present rates. Paper and personal sub sistence is from 5 to 10 prices over and above former rates, and we must either break in our efforts to c...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 10 July 1863

Great Battle near Gettysburg, Fa- Defeat of the Federal Army. Over Twelve Thousand Prisoners Taken Four Federal Generals Killed — The Yankee Commander Wounded. Petersburg, July 5.—-A train just from Ci ty Point reports a terrible battle near Gettys . burg,. Pa., on Wednesday and Thursday. The Northern papers say that Archer's en tire brigade, (Confederate) was cut off and ta ken prisoners—but only eight hundred had arrived in Baltimore. Maj. Gen. Reynolds, (Federal,) was killed the first fire. Tbe latest is that Meade was calling on Stanton lustily for reinforcements —stating at same time that the fight was in decisive and the rebels pressing him heavily. SECOND DISPATCH. Richmoiid, July s.—The battle at Gettys burg was between Longstreet's and Hill's corps, and nearly the whole of Meade's army. The Federal Gen. Paul is among the killed. The rebels at Carlisle have all fallen back towards the main body of Lee's army. We would reoccupy the place. The Yankee accounts represent the bat...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 10 July 1863

POETRY. The Soldiers Tears. Upon the hill he turned To take a last fond look, Of the valley and the village church, And the cottage by the brook, He listened to the sounds ' So familiar to his ear, And the soldier lent upon his sword And wiped away a tear. Beside that cottage porch A girl was on her knees; She held aloft a snowy scarf, Which fluttered in the breeze. She breathed a prayer for him— A prayer he could not hear, But he paused to bless her as she knelt, And wiped away a tear. He turned and left the spot Oh! do not deem him weak, For dauntless was the soldier's heart, Though tears were on his cheek, Go watch the foremost ranks, In danger's dark career; Be sure the hand most daring there Has wiped away a tear. The Turn of Life. Between the years of forty and sixty, a man who has properly regulated himself may be considered in the prime of life. His ma tured strength of constitution renders him al most impervious to the a .tacks of disease, and experience has given soundness...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 17 July 1863

VOLUME 24. SflfttUu The ViRGmANis published every Friday morn ___•** V per * nnum ' if Paid in advance, or _ i-_ m *™ months after subscribing, otherwise $5.50 will be charged. • j°-f übscri P tion w iH be received for a less pe 'h ! a SiX moDLtks » for wllich $ 2 -50 will be ' No subscription will be discontinued except at the discretion of the proprietors, until all arrear ages shall have been paid up. Any person procuring five responsible subscri- I hers, shall be entitled to a copy gratis. j Terms of Advertising. One square of 10 lines or less, §1.60 for the first insertion, and $1 for each continuance. The number of insertions .must be marked upon the Jnargin, or the advertisement will be continued till forbidden, and charged accordingly. _ To those who advertise by the year, a liberal discount from the regular rates will-be made. All dues to the office may be remitted by mail, in good and available Bank notes, at the risk of the Editors, the person remitting taking the Post ma...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 17 July 1863

EY COALE «fc BAMS, riday, July V? 9 1863. The News. Our columns te-day will be found to contain matter of deep interest, tho' not much news very definite in its character. A great deal of uneasiness having been felt about the situ ation of Gen. Lee's army, public anxiety will be greatly relieved by the accounts we pub lish to-day. We have nothing further from Vicksburg since our last, except that the whole army did not surrender. Thousands are said to have escaped before the capitulation. Flour was selling in the city at $400 per bbl. before the surrender. lb will be seen that the tide of battle rages fiercely at Charleston. The coolness and skill of Beauregard gurantee almost certain suc cess. Confidence and cheerfulness prevail. We have many rumors, tho' nothing posi tively reliable from Jackson. The wires said a few days ago that a furious assault had been made upon Gen. Johnston, that he repulsed the enemy and was falling back. Bragg's forces are—it would be imprudent to say whe...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 17 July 1863

I-ate Northern News. Yankee Estimate of our Loss at Vicks burg. The Confederacy to be Recognived bg Napoleon. Richmond, July 14. The Baltimore American of Saturday even ing, on the authority of a telegram from New I York, claims 27,000 prisoners captured at Vicksburg, 102 field pieces, 30 siege guns, 50,000 stand of arms, md 57 stand of colors. Only one hundred and fifty men of the gar rison were reported fit for duty. ° Boonsbcro' July 11th, a. m. All is quiet at the front this morning, and there does not seem to be much probability ef a general engagement to-day. The rebels during the night have entirely changed their front, having abandoned Ha gerstown and Funkstown, and fallen back to St. James' College, which is about four miles from the Potomac. Their new lines extend from the College to the river, about two miles this side of Williamsport The Philadelphia "Inquirer" contains the following important item: "Our European files by the Asia contain tiie important information that ...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 17 July 1863

Map oftlie Seat of War in Itlissis- We have received from the publishers at Augusta, Ga., a map of the Seat of War in Mississippi, drawn and engraved expressly for the Constitutionalist. The plan of the map ■was drawn by a competent engineer connect ed with the army of Mississippi. The dispo sition of the military forces, especially those West of the Missis>ippi, has undergone im portant changes recently, but the localities . are sufficiently accurate to give a correct idea of the. progress of the campaign. \ T icksburg is four hundred miles above New Orleans by the river, and 250 above Port Hud son. It is 4G miles west of Jackson. Jackson is on Pearl river, about 46 miles I east of Vicksburg, and about '200 miles north of New Orleans. The Southern Mississippi Raillload from Vieksburg to Meridian, Miss. and the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern rail road to Memphis and the North, cross each other at Jackson. Our forces under General Johnston extend from near Bolton, on the ...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 24 July 1863

VOLUME 24. SiHTO, The Virginian is published every Friday morn ing, at $5.00 per annum, if paid in advance, or within three months after subscribing, otherwise $0.50 will be charged. _ No subscription will be received for a less pe riod than six months, for which $2.50 will be Charged. No subscription will be discontinued except at the discretion of the proprietors, until all arreari *ges shall have been paid up. Any person procuring five responsible subscri bers, shall be entitled to a copy gratis. Terms of Advertising. One square of 10 lines or less, $1.50 for the first insertion, and $1 for each continuance. The number of insertions must be marked upon the margin, or the advertisement will be continued till forbidden, and charged accordingly. To those who advertise by the year, a liberal discount from the regular rates will he made. All dues to the office may be remitted by mail, in good and available Bank notes, at the risk of the Editors, the person remitting taking the Post ma...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 24 July 1863

BY COALE &. BARR, pETriday, July 84,1863. . ' ■ ■ - —:■ * I The Recent Raid. The country was startled Sunday morning by tne report of a Yankee raid upon Wythe ville; but as no intelligence had reached us that the enemy was withinja hundred miles of that place, prior to the report. that he was rapidly advancing, it was hard to credit the statement, coming, as it did, in almost every conceivable form. We have endeavored to sift the facts of the raid from the immense amount of exagerated reports in circulation, but whether we will be able to give anything like the truth we cannot now say. We will, . however, draw upon the most reliable authori ties we have, and where in error, will correct in future: We understand from the Lynch burg Virginian that "a force of Yankee caval ry, number unkrown, but supposed to be a Brigade, left a point five miles west of Taze well Court House at an early hour on Satur day morning, with a view of destroying the railroad and government property at Dub...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 24 July 1863

Movements of Grant in Mississippi. ' The Meridian Clarion, of Sunday morning last, gives some information as to the move ments of Grant, derived from a gentleman who, the editor says, seemed to possess accu rate information. "A column of the enemy, strength unknown, was within three or four, miles of Canton on Thursday evening. The ' object may be to destroy that place and forage on the country down to Jackson, destroying the railroad as they go. for the purpose of flanking Johnston. Jackson is twenty-four miles distant from Canton, and the road is a good one at this season of the year. But the most plausible supposition is" that they will cross Pearl river at a point twelve miles north by a littla east of Jackson, where there is an excellent ford, push on to Brandon, and thus get in the rear of Johnston.— Lynchburg Vir ginian. £ * ♦ ♦ 2E. Important from Europe. Richmond, July 19.—A special correspon dent of the Whig from Runker Hill, near Winchester, gives a summary of the news con...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 24 July 1863

"POETRY. Speak Kindly. BY JENNY WOODBINE. Speak kindly to the erring one— Strive by a gentle word To soothe the hearts of those by whom Kind words are seldom heard ; And never to the human heart, By word or deed, give pain, For when the arrow's planted there, There long it will remain. . Speak kindly to the grief-bowed ones— Grief too may visit thee, And dim thy bright and radiant eye— Thou, knowest such can be. Then add no shade to the pale face That e'er must wear a cloud; By idle jests pain not the ear Of those in anguish bowed. Speak kindly to the suffering poor— Theirs is a weary lot; A gentle word, a pitying look, By them is ne'er forgot. Oh, never pass such coldly by, For they are often met, Speak kindly, 'tis an easy task, And one you'd ne'er regret. • Speak kindly to thy bitterest foe—• Thus make of him a friend ; 'Tis said that virtue pardons first Those whom she would amend. I*hen speak the kind and pitying word, It will not cost thee much; And seme poor erring, suffering...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 31 July 1863

VOLUME 24. Wnms. The Vihgini an is published every Friday morn ing, at $5.00 per annum, if paid in advance, or within three months after subscribing, otherwise $5.50 will be charged. Ho subscription will be received for a less pe riod than six months, for which $i.to Vill be •charged. No subscription will be discontinued except at the discretion of the proprietors, until all arrear ages, shall have been paid up. Any person procuring five responsible subscri bers, shall be entitled to a copy gratis. Terms of Advertising. One square of 10 lines'or less, §1.50 for the first insertion, and 31 for each continuance. Tiie number of insertions must be marked" upon the margin, or the advertisement will be continued till forbidden, and charged accordingly. To those who advertise by the year, a liberal ■discount from the regular rates will be made. All dues to the office may be remitted by mail, in good and available Bant notes, at tiie risk of the Editors, the person remitting taking the Post...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 31 July 1863

BY COALE & BARB. '."Friday, July 31, 1863. Particular notice. Not having time to call upon the subscribers of the Virginian in this place and county, to collect dues, we hope they will call and pay us. We need the money. Our expenses are heavy and have to be met promptly in cash. Examine your receipts and see how the ac count stands. We hope our subscribers at other points will regard themselves as under some obligation to forward to us amount due on subscriptions. Those who subscribed and paid tor 6 months, will please renew their subscriptions by for warding amount for 6 months or longer, as they may prefer. * ♦ ♦ ' — Another Change. We have for several weeks been debating in our minds whether we should raise the "Vir ginian" to a living price, or continue at onr pre sent rates. Paper and personal subsistence is from 5 to 10 prices over and above former rates, and we must either break in our efforts to con tinue the Virginian or raise the price of sub scription to a living rat...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 31 July 1863

places before word was received that the co lumns of the enemy were advancing to the attack. Cooped up as our troops had been all day, j and breathing the impure air of a crowded bombproof, the summons met with a cheerful j response, and they quickly repaired, to their \ trespective positions". The lines of the Fede- j Tals, several hundred yards distant, could r now be descried'advancing through the gloom, bearing towards the beach, as if to make an attack on that side of Battery Wagner. It "was about a quarter to & o'clock. Five minutes more and the column was plainly in sight, appearing, according to the statement given the writer, to be seven lines -deep. Our batteries remained silent until the ene my reached the vicinity of our rifle pits, when grape and canister was thrown into their ranks with fearful precision and execution.— Checked for an instant only, they closed up the ragged gaps in their lines and moved steadily on until within less than eighty yard*. Barely waitin...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 31 July 1863

POETRY. Dreaming of the Past. The brook waves dash the pebly shore, The moon shines clear and bright, And its soft sheen ghists the green earth o'er, In the pleasant summer night; The lonely eve-buds trill their lays While the light breeze brings them near, And thought goes back to bygone days, Through many a changeful year." Words of sadness and of mirth, Loved tones remembered well, And forms we'll meet no more on earth, Have each a tale to tell— A tale of love and friendship past, That memory still holds dear, That garners up to cheer at last, Through each succeeding year. It makes us sad to think of those We never more may see, Though from all sin and grief and woes, The unchanged soul is free; Yet still we hold these thoughts so dear, The fond links of lost love, 'Tis sweet to shed sad memory's tear, And lift Hope's eyes above. July 6th, 1863. D. Runaway in Jail. TAKEN up on the 13th inst., a slave whi calls himself Sam Strauge, formerly o Winchester, Va., and says he was sold ...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 7 August 1863

VLOI_XJM__ 24. Slfttft published every Friday morn ings at $5.00 per annum, if paid in advance, or Within three months after subscribing, otherwise $6.50 will be charged. No subscription will be received for a less pe tted than six months, for whick $S.OO Will be Charged. No subscription will be discontinued except at the discretion of the proprietors, until all arrear ages shall have been paid up. Terms of Advertising. One square of 10 lines or less, $1.50 for the first insertion, and SI for each continuance. The number of insertions must be marked upon the margin, or the advertisement will be continued till forbidden, and charged accordingly. To those who advertise the year, a liberal discount from the regular rates will be made. All dues to the office may be remitted by mail, in good and available Bank notes, at the risk of the Editors, the person remitting taking the Post master's receipt that the money was deposited in the mail. Obituaries of more than 10 lines will be charg ed...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 7 August 1863

IJbkgbcit iiraiuian. BY COALE &c BARR. f \-- . === Friday, .Aug-. *7 9 1863. — ..... .. i. <~ -— Particular Notice. Not having time to call upon the subscribers i|«of the Virginian in this place and county, to collect dues, we hope they will call and pay us. We need the money. *Our expenses are heavy and have to be met promptly in cash. Examine your receipts and see how the ac count stands. We hope our subscribers at other points will regard themselves as under some obligation to forward to us amount due on subscriptions. Those who eubscribed and paid for 6 months, will please renew their subscriptions by for warding amount for 6 months or longer, as they may prefer. — ♦ ♦ «—, Remember, That the subscription price of the Vfgin-;, ian is $5. in advance, per year. If not paid in ad Vance, $5.50 if paid within three months. For 6 months $3,00. Several subscribers have sent $4 as pay " ment for a year's subscription since our ad- T*hce in price, the 3d of July, and expect to rece...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Abingdon Virginian. — 7 August 1863

A Fight at Brandy Station. FROM THE NORTH. Richmond, Aug. 2* I A cavalry fight occurred yesterday near Brandy Station, between Hampton's brigade and three brigades of the enemy, lasting se veral hours. The Confederates fell back up on their infantry supports, and the enemy w_s then repulsed. Our loss was less then a hundred killed and wounded. CoL Baker, commanding the brigade, was •severely wounded in the right arm. Col. Black, Ist S. C. Regiment, was wound ed in the right hand; both arrived here this _fternoon. Col. Young was also wounded. The weather is intensely hot to-day. The Baltimore American of the Ist has a telegram from Washington, the 31st which says, from information received to-day from the Army of the Potomac, Lee has massed his forces in Culpeper and is making other pr eparations to give us battle on the Rappahan nock. Gen. Strong died in N. York from wounds received in the attack on Fort Wagner. Lincoln is about to visit the New England States. Matamoras dates of th...

Publication Title: Abingdon Virginian, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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