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Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 399 items from Austin's Hawaiian Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 30 September 1899

12 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. GcfioeA of SefigiouA Ufiougfif. Wke iawaiian feel BY W. K. ASBRLL. !!l I n 1 & II , 1 I " Bach to Christ " Through Panl. Prof. W. C. Wilkinson, D. D., of the University of Chicago, has writ ten a spirited, stirring article in the Homiletic Review for July under the above title. First he makes a plea for the Apostles' authority in matters of religious faith. Next he points out that the cry so often heard now-a-days, "back to Christ," which seems so loyal, may be treach erous. It sometimes means "back to Christ and away from Paul," as if Christ and Paul were irreconcil ably inconsistent. This he under takes to show is not the case, but that we must appeal to Paul's writ ings for a knowledge of the Christ of the New Testament, the real Christ on whom all that is helpful in the Christian religion depends. Too often is meant by the phrase, back to the Christ of men's imagin ation. The synoptic gospels con tain but a part of the account of the founding of ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 30 September 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. 13 TRANSVAAL QUESTION. The absorbing question of the past month in England has been that of the relations between Great Hritain and the South African republic, ordinarily known as the Transvaal. The administration ol Lord Salisbury under the leadership of Mr. Chamberlain as colonial minister has been steadily and aggressiv, y approaching the point of coercing the South African republic into shaping its internal policy in accordance with the demands made upon it by the llritish Government. The real situation ought by this time to be well understood, i he excuse for British interfer ence is the so-called grievances of Itriiish subjects living in the Transvaal; but this is only a pretext. The time has come when the Urit sh imperialists wish in effect, at least to add the Transvaal to British South Africa. There are many reasons why fir reaching imperialists like Mr. feci! Khoiles find thi existence of the Transv i.U as a I in depen lent republic exceedingly de...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 30 September 1899

14 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. , i i r La Choosing Their Own. She waa a dainty malihini just off' the steamer, for the few hours she lay in harbor. He was a stalwart kamaaina. The purser was responsible for the introduc tion. In the natural order of things they took a hack and went to Waikiki. The afternoon was lovely, a breeze from the moun tains tempering the heat of the sun. She had never been in the tropics before and the cocoanuts were a delight. "They make me feel," quoth she, "as if I were indeed in the land where every prospect pleases." "And naught but man is vile," said the kamaaina. "You needn't incriminate your self , you know ; but this does re mind one of that sort of thing. Only I don't smell the spicy breezes." "Well, just here is hardly the place," replied the kamaaina, as a whiff of the pig-pens and mossy ponds of Waikiki floated sea ward. The hack pr'wer, warned by previous experience, hustled madly by the banana fields and they turned into the annex. "Those outrigg...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 30 September 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. 15 I rienfaf QoftoeA. Porto Rlcan Music. Like all other Spanish speaking peoples, the Rorto Ricans are fond of music. Every cafe has its orchestra, for a cale could hardly do business without one. Every main street during the latter part of the day has its little itinerant band of guitar and violin players, and the warm nights are made pleasant to the stollers along the streets by the sound of stringed instruments which floats from behind the latticed, vine clad screen of private resi dences. Nearly all the airs are pitched in a minor key, which, even when intended to be joyous, contains a plaint to the Anglo-Saxon fond ol Sousa's robust music. To one who has traveled in Spanish lands the music of Porto Rico at first seems very familiar, but the ear is not long in discovering something novel in the accompaniment ol the melody. It sounds at first like the rhythmical shuffle of feet upon a sanded floor, one might suppose some expert clog dancer was nimbly ste...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 30 September 1899

1 i'i M R!! Pacific Mail Steamship Co., Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co., and Toyo Kisen Kaisha. Rlpampra ni Ihp ahnvp Dnmnanlp.Q will nail al Nnnnhiln anrl Ipoup ihifs wvi.w,w w, .,, VV. w..,f,w..w ,., .., ..,.,,.. .. ,v,v .,., M Port on or about the dates below mentioned: For China and Japan : NIPPON MAKU SEPT. 19 RIO DE JANEIRO SEPT. 26 COPTIC OCT. 6 AMERICA MARU OCT. 13 CITY OF PEKING OCT. 21 GAELIC OCT. 3I HONGKONG MARU NOV S For Sau Francisco : AMERICA M'RU SEPT. 19 CITY 01 PEKING SEPT 29 GAELIC OCT. 7 HONGKONG MARU 01 T. 14 CHINA OCT. 24 DORIC OCT 31 NIPPON MARU NOV. 10 RIO DE JANEIRO NOV. 17 For General Information Apply to HE. HACKFEIyD & CO., Ivtci., Agents

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

Vol,. II. Per Copy, 10 Cents. HONOLULU, OCTOBER 7, 1899. jawwwEttgywaa - ,r ,., i, . .? . -"f'V Per Year, $4.00. No. 3. t S?C?J-NiSggg35vi.ta-rL

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. llk:;!"'i. "'iliih l,i; '.'iliii 'lil-li''.'!!!! llilialli'iliilili1 Ji'im :.,. I ' . 1 1'1! niiJ' It is reported by returning veteran8 that there is a more hopeful feeling in the army now that General Joe Wheel er is in Manila, because he is one of the most dashing cavalry ollicers in the army, and no power on earth will stop him from pursuing the enemy after a victory. American citizen-soldiers are unanimous in the condemnation of one man, as a childish imbecile, and a butcher of his own men, through criminal incapacity, it is an im peachment before the bar of public opinion which should cause that criminal to be court uurtialcd. ? win , ! niUh f-th'k .nA-& : .!ii, :,; vawr. rai i h . 'mrm.mrm .lm in '7, "Hi ' 'o,aii " """""'ui w.ii ,irmi m tz rauBmTur. i :"'"." i .'"' '.'. rM w i'i " - ;." ;; n,i mi' Aim The Czar of the Philippines and weak ling of the American army, General Otis' General Otis, has deigned Interview. to give a Sun correspond ent an i...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. fancy, and was followed by others of gen erally increasing size until, in 1855, was held the first Paris Universal Exposition, which inspired the emulation of other na tions. An idea of the growth of the Parisian world's fairs from that date maybe derived fiom the following figures: The exposi tion of 1855 had a motive force for its machinery of 350 horsepower, and it at tracted 23,954 exhibitors and over 5,000,000 visitors. The fair of 1867 had 626 horse power, and 52,000 exhibitors. That of 1S7S had 2500 horsepower, 52,83s exhibitors, 1,600,0000 visitors. In IS89 there were over 5000 horsepower, of which but half was actually used, 55,486 exhibitors and 32,500.000 visitors. Next year, will see a prodigious leap in the motive power, for it is estimated that 45,000 horsepower may be needed, although half that amount will cpiite possibly suflice. Some 20,000 horse power will be installed for electric lighting alone. It is noteworthy that the distribu tion of...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. i sssgsgp . HERMIT OF THE DEATH CAVE. A Story of Skeletons. BY FRANKLIN AUSTIN. "You don't mean to tell me, your Majesty, that you actually believe in ghosts?" "T am perfectly sure that ghosts exist," said his Majesty, "because I have seen them myself. We all have an astral body which, after death, may return to earth with power to make itselt visible. Further more, I am of the opinion that this astral bod' can, under certain circumstances, rehabilitate the skeleton of their former selves and temporarily bring the dead to life. Our Hawaiian philosophy does not go thus far in its reasoning, perhaps, yet in the past, after death, the ancient Hawaii ans waited before burying their dead until the body became so decomposed that all the bones could be easihy extracted. The bones were then buried in caves and laid out systematically upon shelves or ledges in the caves. Why did they do this? I can assure you that I have witnessed the phenomenon of the astral body t...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. night and remained sane I cannot say. The ancient hermit reclined comfortably upon his pile of bones, telling me tales of Ha waiian folklore which, under less dis tressing circumstances no doubt I should have found instructive, while I crouched upon the rock close to the precipice which formed the back wall of the hut. " At last mine host siiid it was time we en tered the cave. ' That rock you are sitting upon stop the entrance.' He' picked a long stick, evidently for this purpose, and used it as a lever to pry the rock away from the precipitous wall. The rock was so evenly balanced on rolling boulders that it easily swung out into the room, disclosing the en trance to the c ive, which was about three feet square. " 'I hope y u have good nerves,' said the hermit, as he busied himself preparing a Haming torch made from kukui nut oil. 'You will see a great many skeletons, but, of course, being a doctor, human bones cannot have much terror for you.' " 'Yes; I ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

. AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. K. ' I -i A i- descriptive of Maori life and customs, given at the Y. M. C. A. Hall, on Sept. 'Jftth and 28th, by Mr. Wherahiko Rawei, attracted audiences which packed the building in every part, and which throughout testified its appreciation by hearty laughter and warm applause. Standing before that large gathering, the rep resentative of a fine but fast disappearing peo ple, the gifted New Zealander seemed to form a connecting link between the Maoris and our own Hawaiian natives, for the two races undoubtedly possess many similar characteristics, and the welcome h" received was at once spontaneous and enthusiastic. PaHBHBHBHi bbbbbkbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbbb1 Tatooed Maori Chief. Attired in picturesque native costume, Rawei presented an attractive appearance, and aided by a constantly changing background of beauti ful and artistic pictures, he succeeded in trans porting his hearers into the heart of Maoriland, and it was easy to imagine oneself in the ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Aotea, Arawa, Tainui, Mata-Atua, Takitumu, Tokomaru and Kurahaupo. Hence the native proverb: "I kune mai i Hawaiki te kune kai te kune tangata." The seed of our coming is from Hawaiki, the birthplace of man The following dialogue will serve to illustrate a Tuhunga's method of teaching Maori youths and maidens this interesting tradition: Priest (to class of children). Keiwhea koia taua whenua i huaina nei e koe, ko Hawaiki ? (Where is the land which you called Hawaiki ?) Children (aloud). He moutere tena o te mo ana nui, e tu na ki te teha o te raki. Ko te whenua i nohoia e nga tupuna Maori i eke mai nei ki Aotearoa. (It is an island of the great sea standing towards the north. It is the land which was inhabited by the forefathers of the Maori who emigrated to this land of Aoteaioa.) Priest. He aha te take o ta ratou hekenga mai ? (What was the cause of their emigration?) Childien. He nui no te whawhai ki Hawaiki. Na, ka heke mai a Ngahue ki konei, kai ana i...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. HblllSIC atmM nishing a very neatly and cleverly exe' cuted performance ol' legerdemain His facial imitations too are excellent. The WilLirds, announced to arrive next week, have been heralded in the San Francisco dramatic papers as some what phenomenal in their way. An Old Timhii. The Orplieum. The Orpheum with the latest -arrivals con tinues to present a program that draws good houses. Iioggs and llaew.ird keep up the dramatic end in an entirely s.itisfactary manner. Winton's engagement, though short, was a great success, and on his re turn he will be welcomed as an old favorite. Hamilton, through sheer merit, has made more than a passing reputation for himself in Honolulu. His ex cellent baritone, I see the"'Tiser" persists in culling him a "tenor," has been employed to excellent advantage in happily selected bal lads, and has succeeded not a little in helping to draw to the house the clientele that can ap preciate his reportoire. The rest The Boston Lyr...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. Clay Clement's Engagement. Clay Clement has liis " paper " out, but whether he is aelually coming the Wkkklv h,is been unable to find out. Mr. Clement is not exactly a new star; he was known in the environs of Chicago several seasons agone he played the Hells and the New Dominion, opening at Waukesha and, after a brief season, re-opening and playing through Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin, lie has been known to the Pacific Slope also for several seasons. His plays, by some, are voted prosy by others good. The Wkkklv re serves its own opinion, based upon personal observation, until learning of his positive appearance. changes of raiment, looked solemn ly into his face and replied: "Ye sud never play gowf in n pair o' new hreeks, for ye'll aye he lookin' at them whan ve sud be Jookin' at ver ha'." SPORTINQ. The Financial Side of Yacht Racing. It is estimated that the cost of building and racing the Shamrock and Columbia for this season alone cannot be much less ...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

IO AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. i A i i v ' Iwlfo' PUBLISHED BY THE AUSTIN PUBLlahiNG CO, FRANKLIN AUSTIN, ALLAN DUNN, Mnnoglng Editor, Assoclnte Editor and Artist Subscription, $400 per Year. United States and Canada, $5.00 per Year. Other Countries in Postal Union, S6,oo per Year, Postage Paid. Single Copy, Ten Cents. Business Office and Editorial Rooms, Lincoln Block, King St., near Alakea. HONOLULU, OCTOBER 1899. Ladies Portuguese Charitable Asso ciation 1001) Charitable Society of Haw 'ii 1000 Cithulic Henr vol'ent Union 1000 Kapiolani Ma'emity I lome 1000 Chinese H spital 1000 Japanese Ilenevul nt Society 1000 On Monday evening all the employees, their wives and sweethearts, were entertained at a ball by Air. E. Suhr at his Waikiki residence. The employees of the Hilo branch of the Hackfeld Co., A Hallt Century Old. A half century ago Mr. II. Hackfeld established the firm of H. Hackfeld & Co. It had a small beginning as all business concerns that now wield great commercial in...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. ii How a Story is Written. A writer in tiic Academy, who evidently belongs to the class of readers who insist upon remember ing popular authors through the things which the authors them selves have forgotten, rather than those which have since made them popular, has recovered from his in convenient memory the fact that once upon a time Anthony Hope began in a magazine, the name of which he omits to mention, a series of articles entitled The Fly on the Wheel, and that they came to an untimely end, a circumstance which terminated Mr. Hope's connection with journalism. In one of these articles, this writer says, the ques tion was asked by a woman, "Oh, Mr. Fly, how do you think of those lovely stories?" or by a man, "I say, Fly, old chap, how the deuce do you turn out all that stuff of yours?" which question was an swered by a page from the Fly Journal, the genuineness of which will, we think, he acknowledged by the experience of most writers who are dubious o...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

12 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY i QcftoeA of SefigiouA Jftougftf. BY W. K. AZBILL. The Coming Theology. A writer in The Interior (Presby.), has this to say of the reformers who have appeared on the religious arena since Luther's time: The present condition of theology is that of a great number and variety of partialisms. We have had no great theologian since the Reformation, who was not a p.irtialist, con fining himself tp one truth with its immediate foothills, and antagonizing other partialists who were esalting some other truth. Per haps the most striking example is seen in Arminius and Cahin, both of them extreme partialists ; the one carrj ing freedom to the extent of absolute self sufficiency, and the other c.rtring Diine sioereignty to the extent of fatilUm. Eery denomination stands upon a p-irtialisni, some of their Miechlties so small and insignificant as to diidc the Disciples of Christ into waring sects, which can have no othei source or motive than human obstinacy, egotism a...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. ,13 Strike oP Japanese Laborers in Peru. DirFERENCE OF LANOUAOE CAUSED ROWS WANT OF RICE HKOUOHT ON A STRIKE. As we reported in April last, the Morioka Emigration Company sent over 800 Japanese contract laborers to Peru to be distributed among the thirteen sugar plantations along the Pacific coast in that country. We now learn that the emigrants in some of the plan tations struck work in June and July last. The circumstances that induced them to do so are thus gien by the Jiji : Of the thirteen Japanese who accompanied the emigrants in order to superintend them, seeral understand English, but rmly one is acquainted, and even that impel fectly, with Spanish, the national language of Peru. This disadvantage proed a serious obstacle to the maintenance of smooth and amicable relations between the Japanese laborers and their na- I tive overseers who knew only their own mother tongue. Furthermore, it must not be forgotten that Peru once maintained the slave syste...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

". 14 AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. I I m Branded for Life. The writer of Round About Hono lulu is not feeling up to his usual mark ; he is depressed, and has the feeling of a branded man. The finger of suspicion has been lifted against him all on account of an innocent shampooing recipe. The barber of the illustrious knight of the pen, after making sundry uncomplimen tary lemarks anent the baling-wire calibre of his hair and its imminent state of baldness, offered to restore his locks to their pristine state of brilliancy if he, the writer, would procure half a dollar's worth of alco hol, pure, to be mixed with other ingredients. Unsuspectingly, the victim went forth to his doom. Entering the palatial store of Hol lister & Co., where they dispense with equal celerity and placidity, soda water, cameras and drugs, the would be shampooee boldly approach ed the affable clerk with a request for fifty cents worth of pure alcohol. " Won't methylated spirits do ? It's just the same thing."...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Austin's Hawaiian weekly. — 7 October 1899

AUSTIN'S HAWAIIAN WEEKLY. 15 High-Glass Portraits Rudynrd Kipling's Impressions of Japan. Ruyard Kipling made one voyage around the world avowtdly as a globe trotter. It was in 1889 he was, at that time, n leporter for The Pioneer, published at All.ihabad, and also did work for The Military Gazette, In 'the early spring of that year he set out by way of China and Japan to visit America and England. At regu lar intervals he wrote letters describ ing what he saw. " Nagasaki is inhabited entirely by children. The grown ups exist on sufferance. A four-foot child walks with a three-foot child, who is hold ing the hand of a two-foot child, who carries on her back a one-foot child, who but you will not believe me if I say that the scale runs down to six inch little Jap dolls such as they used to sell in the Burlington Arcade. These dolls wriggle and laugh. They are tied up in a blue bedgown which is tied by a sash, which again ties up the bedgown of the carrier. Thus, if you untie that sas...

Publication Title: Austin's Hawaiian Weekly
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Hawaii, United States
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