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Title: Ranch, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

Skim Milk for Hog*. Extensive experiments have been conducted at the Dominion of Canada station along the line of ascertaining the feeding value of skim milk lor is It was found that when swine V vere fed with meal consisting largely O f ,-ye and wheat 4.27 pounds were re (Hiired to give one pound of gain, but when a similar lot were fed meal of the same character, half the quantity being given in conjunction with all the skim milk they will consume, it required 1.26 pounds of meal for one , )Olin( , of gain, together with 25.39 rounds of skim milk. In this instance one pound of meal would be worth 8.34 pounds of milk. When corn was fed in conjunction with skim milk for a period of 100 days it was found that the lot fed corn alone made an average net gain of ninety-eight pound, while the hogs fed corn and skim milk made an average net gain of 118 pounds. In this instance it required 4.16 pounds of corn alone to make one pound of gain, while in the other lot it required 2.90 pounds o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

*4 DAIRY COMMISSIONER'S REPORT. Tlu> biennial report of E. A. Me Donald, state dairy and food commis sioner, just filed with Governor Me Bride, shows an increase in the pro duction of butter in this state of 2,000, --(•00 pounds during the past two years and of 1110,1100 pounds of cheese during the same time. King county manufac tured the largest amount of butter, but the report does not show that all of the cream was produced in the county. In fact, the commissioner states that much of the cream was shipped in from outside dairy ranches to the local creameries. The greatest proportionate gain made during the two years was accomplished by Clal lam county. Despite the large gain made by the dairying industry during the past two years the result is not regarded as satisfactory. Commenting upon a showing of the amount of but ter and cheese shipped in to this state from outside sources Dairy Commis sioner McDonald says: "The large amount of butter and cheese shipped from other states...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

Seattle Tacoma and Spokane during the year This table indicates that Tacoma was the only city which hand led more Washington than Eastern or Coast butter, and that the market in each of the three cities was supplied with cheese by outside factories. The amount of dairy products handled in Seattle during the past year makes an interesting showing. There were 1,799.909 pounds of Wash ington creamery butter sold, 2.298,800 pounds of Eastern butter. 535,547 pounds of California and Oregon but ter, 228.339 pounds of Washington cheese. 376.000 pounds of Eastern cheese and 627.024 pounds of Califor nia and Oregon cheese. Speaking of the milk supply of the state the commissioner declares: "There is r.o more important work than the purifying of the milk supply. The quality of milk sold in Seattle, Ta coma and Spokane is above that re quired by law." As pure food commissioner Mr. Mc- Donald strongly urged some action on the part of the legislature to prohibit the introduction of short weights...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 January 1903

i 6 A NICE FAT INCOME. You can have money coming to you as sure as interest on government bonds if you ship your cream to us. Ours is the ideal system, with modern, up-to-date cream-gathering and butter making equipment. We have the best butter market in the West. We guarantee to get you more for your butter than you will be paid for it at home. No pan-skimming. No churn ing. No drudgery for the women folks. You keep the skim-milk. We pay spot cash twice a month. H. I. Weinstein & Co., Seattle Successors-to the Meadowbrook Co. CLOSING - OUT SALE! A Choice Lot of DAIRY COWS HOLSTEINS, JERSEYS AND SHORTHORNS. Also Farm Imple ments and 9O tons hay in barn Lowman & Pelly Sll Pioneer Bldg . Seattle THE RANCH. A HAPPY NEW YEAR To all our friends and patrons. 1902 was the most pros perous season in our his tory. We thank you for increased patronage and trust service rendered merits its continuance. Merz Dairy Supply Company SEATTLE, WASH. The Best Clubbing Offer Ever Made. | T HE R...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

, _, ■ : ; A\ IjjJ^ Nineteenth Year NO FARMERS' INSTITUTE. The Ranch recently asked for a list of places and dates of 1903 farmers' in stitutes, and received the following reply: Dear Sir: Replying to your favor of December 30th I regret to say that owing to the lack of funds we find it impossible to conduct any institutes until after the funds for the next fis cal year become available. It is not only the lack of funds for expense money for institute work, but owing to the lack of funds we were compelled to dispense with the services of six or seven members of the faculty, which threw a much heavier burden on the rest, rendering it practically impossible for them to get away. I sincerely hope that a special appropri ation for institute work may be made by the coming legislature, and think this should be urged by the agricultu ral press. Very truly, E. A. BRYAN, President. Pullman, Wash. COMPARISON OF MILK PRICES. AUBURN. WASH., Jan. 7, 1903. Editor Ranch, Seattle, Wash.: This item ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

9 STOP LAND-STEALING. First Step Toward National Irrigation —Evils Due to Desert Land and Commutation Laws —Why Private Schemes for Irrigation Fail. (William E. Smythe, author of "Con quest of Arid America.") The operations of the land laws of the United States have been in the main beneficent. The dominant idea in public land administration that homemakers would be given a part of Uncle Sam's vast public domain has caused the westward movement of the sturdy sons of our New England and Eastern farmers, and has attracted other thousands of the better class of European emigrants. The result has been a great homemaking movement which has civilized and settled the Mississippi valley and the states to the westward in an incomparably short period. But the land laws which have made possible this great move ment have likewise benefited the land speculator, and in some sections, un der their loose administration, great areas have been wrongfully and fraud ulently acquired and to the great de...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

m e ranch With which is consolidated Hie Washington Farmer, The Pacific Coast Dairyman, The Farmer and Dairyman, The Farmer and Turfman. Official organ of the State Dairymen's Associa tion and the State Livestock Breeders' Associ ation. MILLEK FREEMAN, - Editor and Manager. Editorial Ottices: - - Seattle, Wash Tel. Main 1265—Long Distance Connection. Issued Ist and 15th of each month. BUSINESS OFFICES: Seattle - Metropolitan Bldg., ' Cor. -hird and Main Sts. Spokane - Alexander A Co., 621 First Aye Subscription (in advance) fI.OO per year. A^nts wanted in every town to solicit subscrip tions. Good commission and salaries paid. The paper Is sent to each subscriber until an or der to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be notified In writing, by letter or postal card when a nubscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot ttid it on our list from the name alone on the pa oer We must have both name and address, and all arrearages o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

4 A FARMER'S EDUCATION. It has generally been supposed by those who live exclusively in cities and towns that it is not necessary to educate the farmer beyond knowing how to read and write and the simple rules ot arithmetic. By such mental acquirement* he would he enabled to read the weekly paper and to figure up the value of commodities he may have to sell. Of course if he had a boy who was determined to have a profession that boy would, if possible, be si'iit to a high school or college. [f the boy aimed at a commercial ca reer he would go to a commercial col lege; but If he aimed at neither of these, hut was content to stay on the farm, why, a few months in winter at a country school presided over by a teacher who himself knew little more than the three R's —readin', ritin' and 'rithmetic —would he deemed suffic ient. What did a boy on the farm want with an education? it would be asked. He could have no use for it. And, besides, it would be apt to make him discontented and he mig...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

IMPROVING THE GRADE HERDS. (Address by D. Drummond Myrtle be fore the Ontario Farmers Institute.) In traveling through the country, we notice that if there is any one branch of agriculture that rtands in need of improvement, it is the live stock branch, and especially cattle. In nine cases out of ten, when look ing at a herd of cattle it is impossible to tell what ideal the farmer had in view when breeding them, unless it was to produce an animal. The breeds are so mixed that in most cases they are worse thaa twenty years ago, as they have moje variations, but it is now easier to breed up on account of each new cross making the whole more pliable 01 susceptible to improve ments. Is there anything we can say to help the farmer to improve the stock he has? There is always the common answer, "better feed and bet ter blood," a good solution of the prob lem if he knows how to use them to better his stock. These two factors must always go together, but after them comes that great problem ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

6 GREAT MONTANA BREEDING PLANT OF THE CATLIN L. AND L. CO.* The men who have maintained a fixed idea of progress in cattle breed ing and who have never wavered when the industry seemed to drag, have been the successful men in all states. There have been times in Montana when it seemed discouraging to con tinue the work of improvement in our herds, and when the cattle product was at a low ebb in the markets of the world. But there are a few men in this state who never wavered from their plan of progress, and who are today showing by their success that there is always and will ever be a de mand for the best. Whenever a mar ket is overstocked it is wua the "or dinary" class of products. In such a market the product that rises above the "ordinary" is saleable. To pro duce the better class of cattle was the motto of the Catlin Land and Live stock Company, of White Sulphur Springs, and ever since the estab lishment of their big breeding plant in 1891 that policy has been rigidly adhered t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

X J. S. and W. E. Catlin. It has been engaged in cattle breeding and general farming since 1891, and holds a membership in the National Here ford association. The business is man aged by Charles B. Catlin, assisted by J K. and J. S. Catlin. That they enjoy the esteem of their fellow citizens is evidenced by the selection of Charles B. Catlin as member and chairman of the Meagher county board of commis sioners. The firm also holds member ship in the Montana Stock association. In the way of promoting all that will benefit the stock and farm interests of Montana these gentlemen have always stood willing and ready to do their share. They believe in advancement, in progress, in improvement. There is no doubt that they have been of mater ial aid to the stockmen of their sec tion particularly and of the state in placing in the home market available breeding stock of high quality and at reasonable prices. With Montana's great forage, pure air and unapproachable climate it will continue to g...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

8 Horticultural Notes By F. Wai den While in the city of Portland recently my wife and 1 were the guests of Prof. C. M. Kiggins and his most excellent wife. Such an event would not be mentioned here but for that fact that Prof. Kiggins, in addition to being a thorough and up-to-da.te educator in charge of one of the largest schools in Portland, is an enthusiastic fruit grower, lie owns a forty-acre apple orchard in the Boise Valley. Mis orchard has been plant ed some nine years, and is in full bearing. In the course of our conversation I gath ered some things from his experience that are valuable. Like all beginners, he made some mistakes and the manner in which he overcame these is worthy of being told in The Ranch. * * * I 'rot. Kiggins, when his orchard began to hoar, found that he had planted some un profitable varieties. This was notably true of the Wolf River and the Pewaukee. These are big, showy apples and very readily at tract attention. How often at fairs we hear people sa...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

Best Varieties of Apples to Plant. A Practical and Successful Orchard ist gives some Valuable Informa tion for Beginners. By F. Walden. In the last issue of this paper appeared a letter from F. W. Nessly of Prosser, asking for information as to the best varieties of apples to plant. Inquiries similar to this ?.re frequently made. As this is a practical question and one in which so many are in terested, the substance of the answer sent to Mr. Nessly is given to the thousands of readers of The Ranch. First, let it be noted that Mr. Nessly in quires as to apples suitable for a commercial orchard. A commercial orchard is planted for money-making. It is well known to all practical orchardists that there are many very fine apples that cannot be raised with profit. Many beginners in apple grow ing make the mistake of supposing that if an apple is really fine in quality and one that the people want, that is the apple to plant largely. The Esopus Spitzenburg, for instance, is a very fine app...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

10 BUTTER IN THE ORIENT. Dairy Commissioner Bailey, of Ore gon, is In receipt of the following in tnesting letter from Hon. H. B. Miller. V. S. Consul in China, regarding the outlook in the Orient for Pacific coast dairy products: m. \v. Bailey, "Dairy and Food Commissioner. "Hear Sir: —Concerning the Orient, 1 beg to advise you that in the mar kets for the dairy products there has been a constant increase in the con sumption of butter, both in China and Japan. Butter and cheese to the amount of 29S.<><)0 pounds were in ported into China in 1901. This was an increase of over 70 per cent, over the previous year. The enlarged con sumption of these articles indicates a growth that will make the con sumption of 1893 at least double the present quantity. "The increased passenger travel on the Pacific ocean is also enlarging the Pacific coast market for butter aiiu cheese in a marked degree. "The demand for butter and cheese in Japan is also growing, and will continue to increase...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

POULTRY YJIRB ME AN' JAKE HEFNER. Vie an' Jake growed up together, choolniates back in Indiana and married dotters of Zeke Jones. i big was 33 years ago this last fall. hoarded with our folks first year, I ,| we hoard about the free land out \, w Braska, and we fixed up a big covered wagon and pulled out fur bet or worse. Jane and Tilda hated „: part with their folks, and they iln't be blamed fur it; I think they l me an' Jake all right , but since comln 1 t<> think on it, it was callin' fur considerable resolution on them to leave the peace and quiet of their old ,ihs. fur what? They didn't know Q or we didn't know, but they cheered , , by the time we got over into lowa, and by the time we got to the Mis sourl river they seemed to like to look out and see things we was pass in'. ] have been thinkin' considerable about old times lately. Talk about the brave boys in blue and Dewey at Ma nila,, I don't know whether they had more courage than Jane and Tilda or not. Tell the truth...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

12 THE STOCKMAN'S "FINISH." I From a talk by Ashleigh C. Halli well, editor of the Chicago Daily Live Stock World, before the Kansas Im proved Stock Breeders' Association. January 14. 1903.) GOT. Stanley, referring to the in rii-ase of $42,000,000 in the value of live stock in Kansas since 1898 and th<- increase of more than $80,000,000 in the principal agricultural products, wisely strikes the key note of the sit uation when he says: "If a halt is called in the movement to purchase on time at the present very high prices, it will be of great benefit: in other words, if it has a tendency to keep our people from run ning in debt for what they buy it will result in much good." In other words, the Governor wants the stockmen and farmers to prolong and not destroy their good fortune. The Governor probably does not want to encourage any more brass band cattle kins to work their credit to the limit and beyond and then make their finish in Mexico. * * * During every boom period in live ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

till higher and low means no bottom. b -pi,,, men. however, who make the , finishes in the stock business, are £ tWO classes; fust, those who make niselves Independent of picking up ' „N Y animals here, a few there and v\ somewhere else, and who breed feed steadily and systematically, tn ey would expeit to run any busi- These people work right along year with another, being prepared do what the Dutchman meant when a id the way to do was to "take the , { with the sour." The second cessful class are they who figure vhat the crowd is going to do and d 0 til*- other thing: that is. they most when others are most anx to sell, and as a rule have some ,g 10 sell when the others are "all * * * Then, too, the stockmen who make best finishes are those who keep st in touch with market supplies Icmands and changing conditions. Xo matter how good an education ()n e may have acquired in the practical schools of breeding-pen and feed lot, his education in the school of live stock cannot be complet...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

*4 WHAT IS SUCCESS? Editor The Ranch: I have just fin ished reading Carnegie's book, "The Empire of Business," and compared the same with other noted and suc cessful business and professional men. Every author advises the reader to follow a certain path and he (the read er) will surely reach the land of gold or fame. We will mention a few points which those noted authors tell us to bear al ways in mind: Economy, temperance, let gambling and speculation alone, never misuse your credit, concentra tion of your mind, be industrious and regular in your habits, make yourself indispensable to your employer, be pa tient and stick to your point. I wish my reader would go over all these points carefully and then look around your acquaintance and find someone to whom you could apply all these good qualities and still he don't make a success, as it is generally un derstood. Why? The simplest an swer would be: he has not the stuff in him. I wish to add that in order to make a great success of li...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

ADVERTISING LIVE STOCK. prof. Thomas Shaw, whom every body knows, has the following re marks to make in Class Advertising, which we most heartily commend to our readers: ••The idea that underlies any kind of advertising is, of course, to aid the successful sale of the article or arti cles so advertised. To make it effect ive there must be the medium in which to advertise, effective constitu ency to be reached. To these condi tions live stock advertising is no ex ception. "It is not enough that a paper have a large circulation to make it an ef fective medium in advertising live stock. Even a farm paper may have a very large circulation and yet it may not reach a large number of that class of people who are likely to invest in pure bred stock of any kind. It may circulate chiefly through that class that are not prepared to take this up ward step from lack of instruction or lor other reasons. Another paper with a smaller circulation may reach a large number of farmers so far ad vanced ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1903

i 6 Experiment Stations in the United States. We get so many inquiries From farm ers in various states in regarl to mat ters that their experiment stations would gladly settle for them better tuan we can at a distance, that it seems that many farmers are not aware that they have a station. We therefore have prepared the following list so that everyone can know the ad dvess of their station. All these sta tions publish bulletins and list the names of all farmers in the state when requested, and send them the bulle tins regularly as published. Have your name listed at your station; then study the bulletins you receive Alabama, Auburn, P. H. Mell, Ph. D. Director, (Now at Clemson, S. C.) Alabama, Canebrake, Uniontown, J. M. Rieheson. Alabama, Tuskegee (Colored), G. W. Carver. Arizona. Tucson, R. H. Fortes. Arkansas, Fayetteville, R. L. Ben nett. California. Berkeley, E. W. Hilgard, Ph. D. Colorado, Ft. Collins, L. G. Carpen ter. Connecticut, New Haven, E. H. Jen kins, Ph. D. Georgia, E...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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