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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 President says research is vital to Virginia agriculture industry (Continued from Page 1) "Again, we must fight for Extension and research dollars that seem harder and harder to restore each passing session," he told the 275 delegates. Ashworth said Farm Bureau would request that $4.4 million be reinstated next year to fund vacant positions at Virginia Tech's 12 agricultural research and Extension centers around the state. He said Farm Bureau would also push for level or increased funding in 1996 for the Cooperative Extension budget," which has become a political football between the executive and legislative branches of state government in the past six years." Farm Bureau helped restore $12.2 million to Extension and research budgets during the 1995 General Assembly, after Gov. George Allen proposed cutting $14.6 million. 'It is imperative that specialists are provided to perform research for the diversified agriculture we have in Virginia," he told the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

6 Ag Activities Jan. 7-11: American Farm Bureau Federation annual meeting, Reno, Nev. Contact Jonathan Shouse, Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, 804-784-1381. Jan. 9: Friends of the Industry of Agriculture breakfast meeting, 8 a.m., Holiday Inn Conference Center, 6531 W. Broad St., Richmond. $8. Contact Donna Izac, 804-786-1452. Jan. 10: Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services board meeting, 1100 Bank St., Richmond. Call 804-786-2373. Jan. 11: Virginia Agribusiness Appreciation Banquet, Arthur Ashe Center, Richmond. Contact the Virginia Agribusiness Council, 804-643-3555. Jan. 11-12: Virginia Agri-Celebration '96, Omni Hotel, Richmond. Featured speakers: Gov. George Allen, Secretary of Economic Development Robert Skunda. Contact the Virginia Agribusiness Council, 804-643-3555. Jan. 13: Virginia 4-H Foundation Auction, Williamsburg. Contact John Dooley, 703-231-6371. Jan. 15-17: West Virginia-Virginia State Horticultural Societies joint annual meeting and trade show, ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation ▼ 70th Annual Convention ▼ Nov. 27-30 ▼ Williamsburg Marriott ▼ Special Pullout Section I Environmentalists' vision does not include people By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WILLIAMSBURG—Today's environmentalists have a vision and it doesn't include people, a property rights advocate told farmers at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1995 Annual Convention. William Perry Pendley, president of Mountain States Legal Foundation in Denver, Colo., spoke Nov. 29 at the convention at the Williamsburg Marriott. His conservative, non-profit law firm represents private property owners unable to hire a lawyer when they feel the government has infringed upon their rights. "For a long time, we all thought the environmentalists' vision was neat —this beautiful ecotopia in which creatures live together in perfect harmony, like the CocaCola song says," Pendley said. "A lot of people saw this ecotopia as a thing where wolves would r...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

C-2 f[J^ CSSSd mk- m 4|9 nH : y H JB jpP- JM] A.< a _„, ■ ~ WIP Jasmine Williams wins the crown at the convention. Mecklenburg student crowned 1996 Miss Virginia Farm Bureau WH J J AMSBURG-Jasmine Williams said the general public needs a better understanding of agriculture and she hopes her new title as Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 1996 Miss Farm Bureau will enable her to help educate the public. Ms. Williams, the daughter of fifth-generation farmers Walter and Charlene Williams of Mecklenburg County, was crowned Miss Farm Bureau Nov. 27 during the VFBF's 70th Annual Convention at the Williamsburg Marriott. The senior at Park View High School said she has been around farming all her life, but many people haven't been that fortunate. Those people need to be educated about the agriculture industry. "We need to dispel the myths about agriculture," Ms. Williams said, adding that farmers don't abuse their animals or their laborers. "They use specialized care to provide qu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 3 K- Cultural pollution plagues America, official says WILLIAMSBURG—Air and water quality in Virginia are improving while a misunderstanding of agriculture continues to pollute America, a state environmental official said Nov. 27. Becky Norton Dunlop, Virginia's secretary of natural resources, spoke to hundreds of farmers and agricultural leaders at the kick-off luncheon of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's 70th Annual Convention at the Williamsburg Marriott. 'Today in America and in Virginia, we have more forests in better quality and condition than any time in this century," Dunlop said. "We have improved and enhanced big game - deer, bear and wild turkey ~ and are continuing to do so. There are more deer now than in the 19505. Leading agronomist wins top Farm Bureau award WILLIAMS BURG—A nationally-rec-ognized grain researcher who has helped Virginia farmers boost corn, small grain and wheat yields for 21 years has been named the winner of the 1995...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

OA Essex student wins Farm Bureau's Young Ag Award WILLIAMSBURG—Honor student Daniel Taliaferro was named the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' Outstanding Agriculturalist on Nov. 28. The senior at Essex High School received the Outstanding Young Agriculturalist Award during the Young Farmers' Award Breakfast at the VFBFs 1995 Annual Convention in Williamsburg. Taliaferro, 17, is the son of Trent and Karen Taliaferro of Bowlers Wharf. He grew up on a farm, where he learned "all about machinery and how to repair it," he wrote on his application for the award. His achievements include captain of the varsity football team, past treasurer and current president of the Essex High chapter of the Future Farmers of America and co-chairman of the local chapter of the French Honor. He's a member of the school chapter of the National Honor Society, the varsity track team, the church choir and a Baptist inner-city mission program While attending Boy's State, he was Farm Bureau child...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 19% Simple steps can prevent foodborne illnesses Food safety—or lack of it —has been a popular target of media coverage lately. Despite the media hype, most cases of foodborne illness are due to improper handling of food in the home —not in commercial food operations. A few simple steps can keep you from becoming a statistic. First, it's important to know the difference between organisms that cause food spoilage (when foods turn bad) and food poisoning (foodborne illness, intestinal flulike symptoms). The biggest difference is in the temperatures at which the two types of organisms thrive. Most foodborne illness bacteria thrive at room tempera- Young farmers honor Farm Bureau staffer WILLIAMSBURG—The corporate secretary of Virginia's largest farm organization has been honored with the highest award of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Young Farmers' Committee. Jonathan Shouse received the Warren Beach Award during the VFBF's 1995 Annual Convention in William...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

8_ Introduction to Retirement Planning for Agricultural Producers and Small Business Owners Registration Form Please check where you will attend | □ Waverly □ Richmond □ Harrisonburg □ Lynchburg i Name: Please send this registration form plus a j ! Address: check for $15 made payable to VFB to: i Virginia Farm Bureau Federation ! Carleen Matthews, P.O. Box 27552 ! Phone Richmond, VA 23261 • Phone: 804/784-1680 i i Retirement planning seminar scheduled One-day seminars on retirement planning are scheduled for four cities in Virginia on Jan. 4,5,10 and 11. The seminar is titled "Introduction to retirement planning for agriculture producers and small business owners." It will focus on borrowing, investing and retirement planning. Dr. David Kohl will speak at the seminars. He is a national awardwinning teacher and professor of agricultural finance and small business management at Virginia Tech. He will cover these topics: business assets for retirement; financing retirement; Social Secu...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 Amelia, Culpeper County youths win essay contests Girls' essays explain importance of agriculture From hamburgers to T-shirts, agriculture touches the lives of everyone. That's what Carmen L. Griles wrote in her award-winning essay presented at the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Annual Convention Nov. 27 in Williamsburg. The Farm Bureau Women's Committee sponsored an annual statewide essay contest and the contest theme was "The Importance of Agriculture to Me." Miss Griles, 14, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Griles of Amelia County, won the senior essay award. Virginia Farm Bureau is seeking ambitious, outgoing and assertive individuals who enjoy working with the public in the Multi-Line insurance sales field Income and benefits package includes: • Training Salary + Commission • Group Hospitalization and Dental • Life and Disability Insurance • 401K Plan • Unlimited Earning Potential If you would like to be a part of one of Virginia's top insurance sal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

10 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) t Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond. VA 23261 CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec ./Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each i...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 Government checking farmers' pesticide-use records (Continued from Page 1) find success with less potent mixtures. This, in turn, saves him money. Some pesticides cost $400 per gallon. Everett planted 280 acres of peanuts, 350 acres of cotton, 20 acres of pumpkins and 15 acres of rye in 1995. He used 400 to 450 gallons of pesticides for those crops. Although many farmers have kept records for years, theirs might not be as detailed as the government requires. Records must be kept on restricted-use pesticides for two years after their use. Records must include the brand or product name; Environmental Protection Agency registration number, total amount applied; size of the area treated; crop, commodity or stored product to which the pesticide was applied; location of the application; date it was applied and certified applicator's name and certification number. Farmers must also record spot treatments, including those less than one-tenth of an acre. Records c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

sft ■ --1 £5 jSj, $j' I :M " IMHMI And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. _§■_ M f B 1 i > T The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products ofTrigon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary A 111' T\ 91 health m...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

Vol. 55, No. 1 Hungry deer herds are eating farmers' profits By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Deer herds are destroying entire fields of crops in Virginia and farmers are fighting back with guns, Zest soap and stockings filled with human hair. At 950,000, Virginia's deer population is the largest since the days of Columbus, officials said Despite the most liberal deer hunting season on the East Coast and the harvesting of 200,000-plus deer each hunting season, significant crop damage continues. With a lower disease rate now than in earlier times, deer herds are increasing in numbers. Dogs are their only natural enemies. In addition, many does are giving birth to two fawns a year, rather than one, which was the norm in previous years. Some farmers report having seen as many as 30 deer in one field, eating their crops. "Ifs unre- al," said M.L. Everett Jr., a peanut and soybean grower in Southampton County. "We can go out at night and see 25 deer in one field grazing just like c...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

2 Study panel releases tobacco suggestions By LAURA BLAND McFADDEN Special to the Farm Bureau News ROANOKE—Virginia's tobacco family faces the same kind of crisis that rocked Tidewater and Northern Virginia after national defense downsizing. This is the finding of a Virginia General Assembly study panel. "We are into long-term structural change," said Wayne Purcell, a Virginia Tech professor who presented results of a joint House and Senate study on challenges facing tobacco growers in Virginia. Legislators on the legislative subcommittee studying alternative strategies for tobacco growers met Dec. 12-13 in Roanoke to mull over conclusions from the two-year study. Authors of the report include Virginia Tech, the University of Virginia and the Tobacco Communities Project, funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Overall the report paints a bleak future for the tobacco economy in rural Southside Virginia. The use of tobacco products nationally is steadily declining, despite ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

February 1996 Members have endured their share of natural disasters Fire and ice. Too much snow and rain. Heat, humidity and too little rain. We've had it all in Virginia since last April. Many farmers are probably wondering what will come next as one natural disaster after another has challenged their very livelihoods! Yes, this has been a trying year for many of our mem- bers—some who've endured all of these assaults by Mother Nature. Not only are producer members fighting low beef prices, growing environmental regulations and a less-than-understanding consuming public, they are dealing with historic natural disasters. Needless to say, the past 10 months have not been good to most Virginia farmers. The string of four major disasters began last March and April. As farmers prepared for spring planting, forests in the western and central regions of Virginia became bone-dry from persistent winds and lack of rain. More than 8,000 acres of precious hardwood forests burned to a crisp. An...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

4 Ag Extension may be spared budget cut RlCHMOND—Supporters of Virginia Cooperative Extension breathed a sigh of relief in December when details of Gov. George Allen's proposed budget for fiscal 1996-97 were released. For the first time in seven years, Extension was spared a major budget cut. No reduction was proposed from this year's state spending level of $23.17 million, a figure Virginia Tech officials said they can live with. Extension programs provide farmers, homeowners and children with information about farm production and environmental protection techniques. More than 270 employees have been cut from the statewide educational outreach program in the past five years, closing local offices and straining the ability of the agency to carry out its mission. Tech announced a major restructuring program for Extension last summer that called for combining some countylevel programs, along with a greater emphasis on agriculture programs and 4-H in place of some inner-city education ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

February 1996 Agricultural products finding non-food uses By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Your next fast-food meal may involve knives and forks made from corn. The list of new uses for corn grows each year and this includes an increasing number of non-food uses. Corn is used in everyday products, such as ethanol fuel, adhesives, batteries, detergents, candles, crayons, dyes, paper, plywood, antibiotics, printing ink, soap, matches, latex paints, photographic film, shoe polish and tires. This surge in non-food uses is good because the long-term world demand for food is limited, said Spencer Neale, assistant director of the Commodity/Marketing Department of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Farmers in developing countries, such as Brazil, Argentina and Mexico, are competing with U.S. farmers. U.S. farmers will continue to prosper as new non-food markets develop for corn and other commodities, Neale noted. If new markets don't develop for non-food uses of agricultural product...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

6 Federal government regulations costing farmers billions a year Continued from Page 1 require portable toilets and hand-wash-ing facilities near fields on farms when a farmer has 10 or more workers, Park said. The government also controls wages for migrant workers and Park has had to pay migrant workers as much as $1 above minimum wage. To comply with regulations, Park also provided migrant work- QUINAULT EVERBEARING STRAWBERRIES JW, GnetU Hm Uofuebt PICK BERRIES UP TO 2" IN JL ' p DIAMETER FROM JUNE .. TILL FROST Jf * f <o 8 Pi §31 G (Q $ <5 c>\] 10 for $1.95 25 for $ 3.95 K « Q Co * 50 for $6.95 100 for $11.95 Ei i s «s' sr®<s«5 r ®<5« *(s>. j ICo (Q fo "f'yif PLANT THIS YEAR — HARVEST THIS YEAR ftp / (5 - (Q $ * "5 Here's a great-tasting, heavy-bearing new everbearing Straw- Vt/J ,r~ $ berry that grows so big we hesitate to fell you . we're afroid / &g • you won't believe u*. But they hove been found a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

February 1996 Treats for your sweetheart will make a special Valentine r'J. ■ :."■ _ _ ' V.U v'i'i''l :: aiL ,'i. -V _ _ Jbebruary can be a tairly dismal monthiThe holidays are a distant memory and spring is nowhere in sight. Fortunately, there is a Valentine's Day and the best possible excuse to indulge in chocolate. Although there are many foods that inspire passion, only luscious chocsdate will do the trick for Valentine's Day. Instead of opting fop the conventional heart-shaped box of store-bought candies, add some real romance to the holiday and cook up something straight from your heart. If The recipes which Mow have all the flavor of traditional chocolate without all the fat. The key is to use the best quality ingredients. Select the finest brand of chdcreate or cocoa for the richest chocolate flavor. Baker's, Hershey's, Ghiradelli or Tobler chocolate are just a few suggested brands. Other ingredi- Ag Activities Feb. 7-10: Mid-Atlantic Direct Marketing Conference, Fredericksb...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 February 1996

8 VFBF Young Farmers' program successful in '95 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation's Young Farmers' Program had quite a successful year in 1995. Topping our list of accomplishments was Young Farmers' obtaining a voting seat on the VFBF state board. In addition, Russ Simpson, our 1995 Young Farmer of the Never Pay Salon Prices for WIGS! «!» j America's favorite wigs at Discount Prices! All sizes, styles and colors. Natural-looking, cool, light and comfortable. Guaranteed. Send for FREE WIG Catalog! PLEASE PRINT Name in Full P.O. Box or Street Address City Apt Number State Zip Codi Do you ever wear wigs? □ Yes J No Paula Young' KS "America's Largest Wig Company" 1 ; ; -f | iJlfJm&tes '^m? x iaiß»M(^B*"^'i^awBP^v^--i • 'K.-trUa 1 ■ffit'i. ! v'* ■* «* '"*• -«««st W®'^ VIBGINIA FARM BUREAU MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY • VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU TOWN & COUNTRY INSURANCE COMPANY VIRGINIA FARM BUREAU FIRE & CASUALTY INSURANCE COMPANY • SOUTHERN FARM BUREAU LIFE INSU...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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