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Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And Sou... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,937 items from Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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LORD MAYOR'S APPEAL FUND [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

LORD, MAYOR'S APPEAL. l'UND Mr. II. y..'Dillon, shir?. secretary, his hivnd'ecl us the following list of donations received in connectioii^with tiie above fund V— Sjiire of South Gippsland 25 0 9 Cr. M. Synnn ... ... 5^ 5 0 Or. J. Nicol 5 0 0 dr. Michael ... ... 2 2 0 Cr. E. S Gardner..: ... 2 2 0' Cr. J cues ... ...-2 2 0 H. V. Dillon ... ...2 2 0 A. G. Thomas ...' ... 2 2 0 Or. R. \V. Growse " ... 1 1 0 P. Dcvtney ... 10 - G Total £47 6 G Further contributions towards the above fund will be gratefully received

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO BE POPULAR. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

HOW TO BE POPULAR. P.-3 a good listener. Always be ready to lend a liand. Never monopolise tlio conversation. Take a genuine interest in other people. Tke pains to remember names and faces. l.ook for the good in others, not for their faults. Forgive and forget injuries, but never forget benefits. Rejoice as genuinely in another's success as in your own. Have a kind word and a cheery, en couraging smile for every one. Learn to control yourself under the most trying circumstances. Don't get into the habit of doing lit tle duties that should be done by other people. It isn't quite fair to them. In this life everyone ought to do their own work if they are to grow as tiiey should. It is a poor sort of love and courtesy that showers itself on outsiders and has none left for the home people. One of the hardest things in life for most of us to learn is to always keep sweet at homo. But it is worth doing, for if you can control yourself there, there is 110 fear that you will let your self go...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THOUGHT SO. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

THOUGHT SO. " An eminent barrister, now de ceased, once received a severe repri mand from a witness whom he was trying to browbeat. It was an im portant issue, and in order to save his ease from defeat it was necessary that Mr. should impeach the witness. He endeavored to do it ou the ground of age. The following dia logue ensued:— Barrister: How old are you? Witness: Seventy-two years. Barrister: Your memory, of course, is not so brilliant and vivid as it was twenty years ago, is it? Witness: I do not know but it is. Barrister: State some circumstance which occurred, say twelve years ago, and wo shall be able to see liow well you can remember. Witness: I appeal to your Honor if I am to be interrogated in this man ner. It is insolent! Judge: You had better answer the question. Barrister: Yes, sir; state it. Witness: Well, sir, if you compel me to do it I will. About thirty years ago you studied in Mr. Parchment's office, did you not? Barrister: Yes. Witness: Well, sir, I remember yo...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SKYSCRAPER MADE OF GLASS. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

SKYSCRAPER MADE OF GLASS. The latest wonder in New York la a sealed skyscraper which, when com pleted, will be 78 per cent, glass, yet in the building there will be no win dows that may be opened. The en tire twelve storeys will be tight as a drum, the glass walls being set in steel framework. There will be plenty of ventilation, however, aud abun dance of fresh air the year round sup plied at an even temperature by a now ventilating system. In cold weather the fresh atmos phere sucked in from without will ho heated; when the summer comes It will be cooled. At all seasons of the year it will be free from diseasc. breeding germs, being carefully puri fied. The ventilating system is unique in its thoroughness. Air is sucked in through a special duct on the second floor, because air at this altitude has been found to be less impure than at greater heights. The air passes through "shower" chambers, wher9 the impurities are washed out of !t after the manner of a rain-shower. At each floo...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Patriotic Donations. FOSTER RED CROSS FUND. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

Patriotic Qpnations; FOSTER RED CROSSi.FUlSD. We have roceived for publication from (ho treasurers of tlie above fund (Messrs. G. Kllerman and II. B. Mac Lennari) in addition to tlio amounts recorded lact issue, tlie following : — Amount previously acknow ledged ... £16 19 Ciias Johnson ... ... 2 2 Hugh M-Donald 2, 2 airs. H. M 'Donald ' .7. X 1 Miss J. M'Donald 1 1 Rev. A. J. Smith ... t 0 L. S. Astbury ... 1 Q Tiios. Aneurin ... 7.7 ' .10 Total £25 10 0 Further donations thankfully re o. jived."

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

FEDERAL ELECTIONS. POLLING- DAY — SATURDAY NEXT, SEPT. ijtli. THE SENATE. THE LIBERALS^ HQ\y TO YQTE. The method of voting is by placing a cross ii) the square in front of the names of those candidates whom they desire to elect. Electors who wish to vote fqr the SIX .LIBERAL Candidates should mark their Ballot Papers as shown hereunder Barker, S. liarnes, John. Blukey, A.'E.' IT. X Cook, J. Hume (Liberal). X Edgar, Win'. 11. (Liberal). Find ley, Edward. X Manger, Sauiuei (Liberal). X McColl, James H. (Liberal). X McLean, 'Win. J. (Liberal). McKissock, A. N.' liussell, J. X Tren\vith,'Wm. A. (Liberal). HOUSE. ot REPRESENTATIVES X BENNETT, JAMES WISE, GEORGE II. U. C. Hodgson, foster.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

A public meeting is to be held in the Todra Hall ' to-morrow (Satur-' day) evening for the purpose of disv **"•*- cussing""Ways-and means of establish ing a private hospital in the' town.' • .^li interested are invited. Some, very raw recruits were to be. seen at' the' Toora Mechanics' Hall on Tuesday:night, when-ahxnit 30 re-' *; • spondetf 'to' the call to'.fofm a local, detachment of coast guards. The Ij'Ody of teen'were un'd-^r the com 1 rttand of Major JAcobs, and were put •through the rudiments of military, drill. Though, they possessed little knowledge, of discipline. Major Jacobs will very soon knock the squad into shape, as they soon found out that lie possesses all'the abilities of a drill instructor. Drill will be, fijsld1 ori Tuesday ajicL Saturday even tog In each week at 8 p.m. styarp.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Patriotic Sermon. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

Patriotic Sermon. There was a large congregation af. £h"e Toorft Presbyterian Church on •Sunday morning last, <o whom Mr .Preacott preiichod n sermon appropriite of the natibnal crisn which oven-hangs Europe and' England. Tjie preacher look Ilia text from l|Chroniclc?. 11th chap. 1st verse "Then all Israel gathered themselves to David unto Hebron, say ing behold wo are thy bone and thy fleali." ' In his extempore remarks the preacher showed liow wo in this c»pn *ry we're the bono and flesh of our King, and went on to say, "The chapter from Which w'u have selected the test contains llie list'of IJiiviii's men, the "noble men who gathered around hiin when anoint • e'd king over 'Israel, swore allegiance to lu'm, entered into Ins ranks, and de clared their hands should never leave ij.h'e sword until'the liing [had won] his own. " Thine'and we iro on thy side thou" son'of Jessie," was the cry of the . jiosts. There were thirty who stood in Advance of all the rest, thirty who ...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BEAUTY FOR ALL. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

BEAUTY FOR ALU. Ladies, this is a special article for you. Of course you wish to be pretty —ycu would not be a woman if you did no(. But it may be you object to the use of cosmetics. All men don't like the taste of face-powder, and many prefer to see these aids to beauty confined to the ladies of the stage. Besides, to use cosmetics pro perly is an art, and you may not un derstand how to apply • that delicate make-up which adds so much to the appearance of the woman who is past the first bloom of youth. Nevertheless, we think you will be interested in the latest beauty hint, which introduces a principle in cos metics which you may have never tried; for there is a way to use rouge which is warranted to be free from all objections, and is given on the au thority of a medical journal of re pute. First go to any respectable drug gist or chemist, and ask for rouge of good quality. It need neyt be ex pensive—just good rouge, applied, not with a bit of chamois or rag, 'but with n rabbit's ...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
You Trusted Me. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

You Trusted Me. Bocause you loved me I have much achieved; Had you despised me, then I must liave {ailed; But knowing that you trusted an'l be lieved, I dared not disappoint and so pre vailed.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SEEING FOR TWO HUNDRED MILES. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

SEEING FOR TWO HUNDRED MILES. Contrary to the general belief that the heliograph is an instrument for signalling short distances, it has been used successfully over a distance as great as seventy miles. But this ne cessarily was on an exceptionally dear day with an intense sunlight. This instrument, which for moro than half a century has been found of benefit in Army tactics, is destined to pass in the near future to oblivion, as the result of the invasion of the wireless telegraph. The heliograph is nothing more than a mirror, on which the sun's rays are caught and by which they are re flected. The flashes can be thrown in any desired direction, and the tele graphic Morse code generally is used. The distance at which flashes from the heliograph and other objects can be discerned by the eye depends upon two tilings—the height and the clear ness of the air. The most conspicuous object in the British Isles is Mount Snowdon, in Wales, which on a clear day can be distinctly seen from Br...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WOMAN'S WORLD. THE BRIDE OF HER SON. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

WOMAN'S WORLD. THE BRIDE OF HER SON. No moment in a woman's life is quite so difiicult as that in which she meets lier son's future wife for the first time. Perhaps the moment is al mo t as difficult for the fiancee, but she possesses the glorious self-confi dence of youth, and cannot quite grasp the view-point of the woman who knows that the marriage of her son means her loss, but his gain. A moth er rarely loses the love and friendship of a daughter who marries, but when a son weds she instinctively commits one or two possible grave errors—she :ritates her daughter-in-law by medd ling in the affairs of the new little home, or, in her anxioty not to seem interfering, she stands aloof and ap ^nrs indifferent. The forcc of convention makes it particularly difficult for a woman to play successfully her role of mother : in-law. Tradition says that all mot.h ] ers-in-law are disagreeable, officious creatures. And even if Daisy is pre pared to be charming to her husband's i mother, there...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
As Translated. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

As Translated. At a large warehouse there is em ployed a boy who attends to a lift in the daytime and studies literature at night. A few days ago he was given his wages with a small fine deducted for some breach of the regulations. Quite indignant, he went to the mana ger, and began:— "Sir, if you should ever find it with in the scope of your jurisdiction to levy assessment on my wages for some trivial act alleged to have been committed by myself, I would suggest that you refrain from exercising that prerogative. The failure to do so would force me to tender my resigna tion." The manager, tottering, reached for his chair, but managed to ask what was meant. He received the answer in less flowery language: — "In other words, if you fine me again I'm going to chuck it."

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What She Expected. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

What She' Expected. "Look at .her," sain the ironmonger, indicating a departing customer. "She sent her wringer here to be repaired. I promised it her for this week, pro vided that I could get a certain new part in time from the makers. I couldn't get it. Now she wants me to pay a charwoman who came unneces sarily—half-a-crown and twopence tram fare. Then she wants mo to pay the lauiul-y bill for the clothes." The ironmonger paused to breathe heavily. "But that's not all. Her husband dines out on wash-days, and as he dined out on wash-day which wasn't a wash-day—you understand?—she says I ought to pay for his dinner. No, she doesn't ask anything else. And they call 'er the weaker sex."

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
SCORING OFF TIM HEALY. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

SCORING OFF TIM HEALY. The biting wit of the member for North-East Cork does not often fail him. As a matter of fact, he is sel dom at a loss for a retort. There is on record, however, an amusing inter lude in the passing of which "Tim" was discomfited—crushed—and found himself unable to "rise to the occa sion," says Mr. George A. Morton, in "Law and Laughter." During the hearing of a case at the Recorder's Court in Dublin, the Testa ment on which the witnesses were be ing sworn disappeared. After a leng thy hunt for it, counsel for the defend ant noticed that Mr. Healy had taken possession of the book and was deep ly absorbed in its contents, being quit" unconscious of the dismay its disappearance was causing. "I think, sir," said counsel, address ing the Recorder, "that Mr. Healy has the Testament." Hearing his name mentioned, Mr. Healy looked up, realised what had occurred, and, with apologies, handed it over. "You see, sir," added the counsel, "Mr. Healy was so interested that h...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Better Now Than Later. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

Better Now Than Later. One of the shrewd lairds of Lan arkshire had evidently experienced the difficulties of collecting money lent to friends. "Laird," a neighbor accosted him one morning, "I need twenty poonds. If ye'll he guid enough to tak' ma note, ye'll hae yere money hack agin in three months frae the day." "Nae, Donald," replied the laird, "I canna do it." "But, laird, ye hae often done the like fer yere friends." "Nae, mon, I canna obleege ye." "But, laird " "Will ye listen to me, Donald? As soon as I took yere note ye'd draw the twenty poonds, would ye no?" Donald could not deny that lie ' would. "I ken ye weel, Donald," the laird continued, "and I ken that in tliree months ye'd nae be ready to pay uiS ma money. Then, ye ken, we'd qunr j rel. But if we're to quarrel, Donald, [ I'd rather do it noo, when I hae ma [twenty poonds in ma pocket."

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CIGAR CHAMPION. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

THE CIGAR CHAMPION. What is believed to be a world re cord lias just been Bet up at a congress of South German smokers, held at Frankfort. A special trophy, consisting of a sil ver eagle on a red and white ribbon, was offered to the smoker who took the longest time to turn a Mexican cigar into grey-whito ash without let ting it once go out. The competition began at eleven o'clock, and very near ly 200 people contested for the award. By twelve o'clock only twenty compe titors were in the running—the rest had regretfully finished their "weeds" or had laid them at rest in the ash traji for too long. The rivals dropped out rapidly, and by one o'clock only one smoker was left—Herr Henz, a Sachsenhausen business man, who actually pjffed away in peace until he perforce had to throw his diminutive cigar-stump away —two hours forty-six minutes and se venteen seconds after he had set light to it. Herr Henz has therefore been proclaimed smoker laureate.

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
KITCHEN WRINKLES. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 4 September 1914

KITCHEN WRINKLES. If when frying fish of any kind a little salt is sprinkled on the bottom of the pan when it is hot and the fat boiling, the fish can be easily turned without breaking in the least. Cut flowers will remain fresh long er if the stems aro cut with a sharp knife instead of a pair of scissors. The latter compresses the stems and pre vents the water from reaching the top. Before frying bacon it is a good plan to put the rashers into boiling water for two or three minutes. They plump out to twice their ordinary thickness, and all chance is removed of their being too salt. Stains on white flannel can some times be removed by rubbing them with glycerine and yolk of egg mixed in equal quantities. Spread on the stain, leave for half an hour, ' then wash the garment as usual. Two drops of camphor 011 your toothbrush will give your mouth the freshest, cleanest feeling imaginable, and will make your gums rosy and ab solutely prevent anything like cold sores or affections on your...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Leongatha Telephone Exchange. [Newspaper Article] — Toora and Welshpool Ensign and South Gippsland Observer — 11 September 1914

Leongatha Telephone Exchange. Following are the numbers and names of subscribers :— 1. Shire of Woora'yl Offices. 2. Butter Factory, and manager's residence. 3. Co-operative Society's Store. 4 W. G. Walker, storekeeper. 6. Peck & Sons, auctioneers. 6. J. M. Molloy, chemist 7. P. Johnson, butcher. 8. Dr Howden, physician. 9. Nurse Morris, private hospital 10. Lardner & Co., ironmongers. 11. Colvin & Co., drapers. 12. A. E. Edney, storekeeper 13. Rossiter & Co., STAR Office. 14. Pearce & Jarratt, butchers 15. S. Maddern,Commercial Hotel 16. Neal Bros,, storekeepers. 17. R. Bair, Otago Hotel. 18. E. Manders, agent. 19. Nurse Good, private hospital. 20. Rev. P. J. Coyne, Presbytery. 21. J. W. Rumpf, private residence 22. J. McFarlane, coaetbuilder. 23. E. McNamara, baker. 21. H. Kelly, undertaker. 25. Jno. Lardner,private resident 26. Dr Pern, physioian. 27. E. A. Cole, auotion mart. 28. McCartin & Co., auctioneers. 29. R. J. Kewish, " San...

Publication Title: Toora And Welshpool Ensign And South Gippsland Observer
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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