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Title: Western Age Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 52,784 items from Western Age, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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OUTLOOK FOR PEACE. LONDON WRITERS' VIEWS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

OUTLOOK FOR PEACE. LONDON WRITERS' VIEWS. What Is the outlook for Peace this Christ mastime? , _ „ 'For the moment peace looms fur awaj, says tho Economist. 'Nineteen centuries after the birth of Christ, Christian nations aro exterminating one another faster than ever before in modern or uueient times. It will be a black and brutal Christmas. Let us hope for a swift disillusionment, a return of common sci;se, a revival ot religion, and a reawakening of the human conscience.' EVACUATION FIRST. 'Germany would not acquiesce In a truce so as to celebrate Christmas! A Christian idea Indeed! If Germany desires to celo brate Christmas in peace, let her evacuate the North of France, Flanders, and Poland, so that the people of these countries also — those who are left — may pray in their ruined churches and celebrate their Christmas un disturbed, even if only in a manger,' says the Morning Post. 'Perhaps tho Allies might begin to consider a truce for Christmas Day — If Germany eva cuated the...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
LATEST FASHION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

LA 1 EST FASWUn. Vorv Miiurt ami fashinoabte aro the cos tumes worn this season of striped material. Some favor what is known ns the awning stripe ami are maile up in 'apron' st.v]e with straps over the shoulders. When this st vie is seleetoil the blouso beneath the straps is* of plain material. A simple walking cos tume in striped voile is seen 111 our illustration.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OVERHEARD. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

; v OVERHEARD. 'Our littlo' lad's very koon about his big' brothor 'listing.' ? 'Ayo, even tbo young 'uns 'avo got thoir knifo: into . tho Germans nowadays.' , ; 'It's not- tha^ with our little lad. Ho says our Bill' kicks so at nights/and ho wants to feci what -it's'' like to havo a bed to hiseolf.*'

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE LAWYER. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

THE LAWYErT I'd rathor bo a Timber-sawyer j Or Candy-peddler than a Lawyer. . Tho: Lawyer looks upon tho Hills And thinks of Nuncupative Wills. Tho Lawyor views tho Rolling Prairio . And talks of Writs of Certiorari. . ? Tho , Lawyer to tho Lafco resorts . And reads up lvickloton ou Torts. The Lawyer lies whoro Sylvan Peaco is And dreams of Mortgages and Leases. I'd feel Starvation's Tooth agnawing Before I'd got my Bread by Lawing!

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ONE THING MORE MUST GO. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

ONE THING MORE MUST GO. 'And one more thing must go. Thb religion of barbarism must go. The world Is weary of 1L It has withstood tho religion of peace on earth already too long. The trinity of king, cannon, and God has outlived Its use fulness. If civilisation is Indeed better than savagery, the God we worship must be a power other and worthier than a mere Head Devil of the UnlverBe.' feasor of Sociology in Columbia University. A field-marshal never retires, but remains. . on tho active list and draws full pay till tho; . day of his death, . ..

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW TO SAY THEM. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

HOW TO SAY THEM. Taking pity on Its readers, the London Dally News generously throws a little light upon the dl^cult question of the pronuncia tion of those curious groups of consonants which the Poles persist in regarding as mat ter-of-fact place names. The following list ot instructions, If carefully followed, will, we are assured, enable the reader to pronounce the names from the eastern theatre of war with all tho ease and vigor of a native: 'The Polish campaign suiters under the dis advantage ot abounding in names of places which cannot easily be pronounced and re membered. This disadvantage Is not reme died by the fact that in the bulletins trans mitted from Russia the Polish way of spell ing is very often discarded In favor of the Russian, which, boing based on an alphabet different from the Polish, proceeds on purely phonetic principles. For Instance, the Polish ?Kallsz' becomes the Russian 'Kalish,' and the Polish 'Szczerkow' becomes the Russian 'Shtcherkov.' Thus the reade...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR MEN OF LEISURE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

OUR MEN OP LEISURE. Admiral Sir John Jellicoe, iu auswc r to Mr. F. N. Churriugtou 's request that ho should join in the protest against professional football during the war, replied: 'I consider it undesirable that officers on active service should express opiuions on matters of publie controversy, but 1 appreciate tho honour done me in asking for my co-operation.' I When you've nothing else to do, Writo to Jellicoe. He'Jl be pleased to hear from you, Writo to Jellicoe. Ask him if he thinks tbe State Ought to close tho pubs at eight, ^ Writo at onco, don't hesitate, Write to Jellicoe. Whon you're fooling in tho inood, Write to Kitchener. Ilis reply will do you good, Write to Kitchener. | Auk Mm what ho reullv thinks i Of Sunday golf upon tho links (Add that in your nose it stinks 1) Writo to Kitchenor. If you have an idlo night, Drop a card to French, lie has heaps of timo to writo, ? Sond a lino to French. 'Twill be nico to hear his viowa On 'whether papers should rofuse ... To pu...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
War and the Woman [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

War and the Woman By MAX PEMJBEETON. lie held up the familiar dirty paper upon which the Post Ofiice writes the most momentous of messages, nnd then showed his companion that it had come froih (jueenstown. 'The men on my side have given in,' lie said, adding nothing of his own act in that great matter; 'the steamers will bo sailing inside twenty-four hours. It's a raee, sir, between me and the worst side of your nation. And I guess I'll win.' 'If you do,' said Trcvellc, earnestly, 'there is nothing our government can do . to repay the debt. ' ' Unless they teach the people the lesson of it; do you think it is nothing to an American to see this great country at the me^ey of the first food panic which over takes her? 1 tell you, it is as much to my countrymen as to yours. Teach them that they have a precious possession in this island kingdom, and you arc doing a great work. I shall be a proud man to nave a hand in it ? ' 'You certainly will have that. It's a lesson we all need. I don'...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOLDIERS' MIDNIGHT CAROL [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

SOLDIERS' MIDNIGHT CAROL. 'A story runB that on Christmas Eve, while Prussian and French lay entrenched against each other in tho war that lost France tho two fair provinces she may recover byand bye, a French soldier stepped out of his trench, und, covered by tho rlllcs of tho I enemy, eang a carol of Christmas— tho agc 01a sons ul ...... war stayed Us bloody purpose while ho sang. 'It did riot affect tho issue; but Just for that brief space, suddenly, the vials of wrath I were sealed, and men Baw visions and dreamed dreams. * 'Nothing In the whole carnival of the that simple song lived. It was of no value; yet it was precious as pearls. It did not affect tho war, but it affected men. It was fine to sing that song, and It was Hne that the song was sung,' says tho Ford Times Christmas Number. Last year 5000 vessels passed through the Suez Canal, 3000 of which were British.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BELGIAN PRIDE. AN APPEAL. SMALL NATION'S IMMORTAL FAME. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

BELGIAN PRIDE. AN APPEAL. SMALL NATION'S IMMORTAL FAME. (By KM ILK VKIiHAKIlKN. In thu London Dally Chronicle.) I Kinlb* Verhaeren is, as Professor * *11 l-fj-t Murray has said, perhaps the greUrst l-!tirn| can poet now living. His work ranges fn-in realistic pictures of common KIrr-|f«h lift- to an ama'/.Ingly idealistic and syml olio of the civilisation of to-day. lie. rather than Maeterlinck, is the grand libr ary figure of modern Belgium. 1 It is the duty «»f Belgians to-day. how* -^er ti'stible theh* misfortunes have been, ri't to Mink to mer«- cnuiplalning nor to dwell on ib'lr misery, i-ui to prove themselves wor thy of their soldiers, who have been, one oil. heroes. The himcntations of women driven from th-ir bnm*s, forced l«» tread the highways of famine, flight and exile, their children elinging to their skirts, are justified and truly pitlab'e. Hut It is not fitting that men, esi-H'lalIv men who can think and act. should i eho of these cries, already somewhat over prolong...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHOT HIS WIFE. TRAGEDY OF CAPTAIN H. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

SHOT HIS WIFE. TRAGEDY OF CAPTAIN H. A case of extraordinary poignancy will shortly come up for Judgment before thJ . second court-martial of Paris, when Captain I H ? , o brilllarit and courageous officer, will | appear on a 'charge of murder of the wife he , passionately loved (writes a London paper). I This, briefly. Is the tragic story. Captain I H— ; — a few years ago married a very beau tiful woman. It was a love match on both i sides, but, unfortunately, the love of Mms. i H— - was so Jealous and exacting that It had come to be a shackle to her husband's mill- I tary career. Then the war broke out, and I Mme. H ? , with her children, was sent by I her husband to the South. She bore the parting ill, and when she learned that her husband's regiment was at Complegne she hastened across France to join him. It was at this very moment that General joiirua circular against, mc *»— womenfolk of his troops on the front was issued. Captain H ? *s superiors objected kindly, but firmly, ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
EGYPTIAN ON EGYPT. PEACE FOR THE LAND. A NEW ISLAM. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

EGYPTIAN ON EGYPT. PEACE FOR THE LAND. A NEW ISLAM. (By Georges Abd-el-MesBih, In the London Dally Express.) The proclamation of Egypt as a British protectorate has put an end to tho anomalous political situation which hus so long prevail ed in that country. Nominally the vassal of an empire to which she paid tribute, and which cxcrclscd con* ; trol over the Investiture of her Sovereign, 1 I.-..,..., ,..„u ,.^,n»|nf,n^ f.*, ,? iilnnnmniia Hfr.nfA. though ruled and administered by tho Brit ish Government of occupation. .Notwithstanding, however, all these anom a Men— Independence, nominal Turkish suzer ai~ty, aud British military occupation— tho country, thanks to the able management of the British, steered successfully through the many financial difficulties of the past thirty years. Egypt will now at length enjoy true free dom. a freedom which is guaranteed to her by the protection of a Power which is at this moment battling for the glory of de fending her word of honor. How has th...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PUNCHED THE GERMANS. INSULT CAUSES MIMIC BATTLE. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

PUNCHED THE GERMANS. INSULT CAUSES MIMIC BATTLE. A good story of the manner In which a party of merchant seamen belonging to Allied ships repaid an offcnslvo German skipper for insulting the flags of their respective countries Is told by tho Cardiff correspondent of the London Dally Telegraph. At a small port on the Pacific Coast of South America were moored four steamers British. French, Russian, and German. One day there came news of the German naval victory off the Chilian coast, in which the Good Hope and Monmouth wero lost. Tho German crew gavo pantomimic evi dence of delight. Presently tho captain became grossly offensive. Ho produced the English. French, aud Russian flags, laid them on his gangway, and invited the shore peoplo to walk over them. He himself leant over the rail with gloating mien, and spat upon the tlags. Signals began to pass be tween the other three ships, and, after a while, a boatload of men from each of them set off towards the German vessel. The British g...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GOSPEL OF FORCE. WHAT NIETZSCHE PREACHED. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

GOSPEL OF FORCE. WHAT NIETZSCHE PREACHED. Since the outbreak of the world war much has been heard of Nietzsche, tho Prussian philosopher, whoso doctrines aro said to have profoundly affected the minds of his countrymen. Some examples follow: — MORALITY. What Is good? All that Increases the feeling or power — the win to power — power Itself— in man! What is bad? All that comes from weakness! What Ih happiness? Tho feeling that power increases — that resistance is being overcome! Let us have, not contentedness, tout more power— not peace at any price but warfare— not virtue, but efficiency! The weak must perish! That is the first principle of our charity. And wo must help them to do so. What Is more dangerous to tho human raco than any crime? Active sympathy for the weak! Christianity! — Der Antichrist, 2. Man should be educated for war, and woman for the recreation of tho warrior. Everything else Is folly. Man's happiness lieth in 'I will!' Woman's happiness lieth in 'He will!' Thou ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Family Notices [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 6 March 1915

In Memoriam. EVES. — In fond and loving remem- brance of our dear son, Samuel James Eves, who departed this life on 28th February, 1909, aged 16 years 5 months. Wo ollou ML aud think r f him When we aro all alono. 1 X-'or memory is tho only thing 'flint (jrief can call its own. V/c who lovn you Badly n.iss you, Only our poor h carta can toll. Wo luvvo lost theo, Ood has called t'uco, Only for a timo farewell, Inserted by his fond father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Eves.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHY WE DONT GET AUSTRALIAN PICTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 10 March 1915

WHVWE Ilia GITAU8. TRALIAN PICTURES. By V.J. -No country in the world has grcatot opportunities, in the way of scenaria, writers, producers, etc., for picture pro duction than Australia, and, knowing this, Australian audiences are asking for Australian films. Mr. B. H. Longford, ths producer of many successful Australian lilms, is enthusiastic on tho subject Our harbour and coast, ho states, offers un limited opportunities for the picture maker, and, thanks to the efforts of early pioneers in tho district of Windsor, nnd also in that beauty spot known as Vau cIuec Park, typical English scenery is obtainable for pictures requiring an Eng lish sotting. 'The Silonco of Dean Mnitlund, was taken in film at Glades ville, in a streot having ou ono sido a complote English sotting— a priory and gardons bordered with a woll-trimmed hedge — while oaks and othor English trees helped tho illusion — tho other side of tho road was characteristically Austra lian, a forest of native gum troes, but t...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SNAKES IN MOTION. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 10 March 1915

SNAKES IN MOTION. A snake moves along the ground by contracting the ribs on one side' of his body, and separating those on the other side. This forms ono curvo. Another 1 contraction takes place at the end of 1 tho expanded side, and bends the body in tho opposite diroction. Thus, there ' is a scries of alternate contractions and spreading^ of the numerous ribs through' 1 out tho length of the reptile as it lien en thu ground.

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
KAISERIN'S GEMS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 10 March 1915

~~~ KAISEBDTS GEMS. The German Empress is said on State occasions to wear not less than £250,000 worth of diamonds and pearls. The Kaiser w.is furious when at ono great function /writes a correspondent) the Kaiserin was outshono by tho ex-Queer of Italy, the beautiful Margherita, and insisted tnat tne empress should almost load herself with gems. ! One of her ornamonts, by the way, i? Mtid to be the circle of gems which Xapoleon wore in his hat, and which was found bv Bluchcr's soldiers after Waterloo. I A few extra stones aro attached to her fan, and at Court functions it is the ' duty of two pages to see that none of these fall off. 1 The Empress's personal jowellcry, on the other hand, is said to bo surpassed by. that of many middle-class women hi Germany; while sho is also in ordinary life one of the plainest of dressers — her gowns, in fact, have been Btyled by French ladies 'simply appalling.'

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
PUZZLES FOR SCIENTISTS. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 10 March 1915

PUZZIE8 FOR SCIENTISTS. ~ ,f?ual* Btm sovoral thinB8 Jn the world, that even scientists do not know, and some of them are tho things that Boom simplest. At tho Boy-1 Institution in London, Professor Boys, in his third Christmas lecturo to a crowded nudionco of child ren, confessed that ho does not know why a wot cloth drawn across a sloping glass surfaco stops a cup in its slido from top to bottom down tho glass Ho was illustrating tho use of liquids as lubricants, and anti-lubricants. First ho flhowod, with a model, how oil insido a bearing in which thero is porhans, only ono-thouaandth part of an nich of apace to sparo, or less, will squtezo under a heavy axlo and lift it up so that it nowhero touches the inBido of tho hub. Tho professor then placed a dry cup op n dry saucor and juggled it about The cup ran to and fro. Whon ho wet tod tho bottom of tho cup it stood steadier whon tho saucor was jigglod. '1 don't know,' he said, 'for forty years 1 have asked pooplo without got ting ...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TILLAGE OR GRASS The Best Mulch for the Orchard. [Newspaper Article] — Western Age — 10 March 1915

TILLAGE OR GBASS . \ 3 The Best Mulch for tho Orchard. Whether tillage is worth tho time il takes is a questiou that many an orchardist iu inclined to ask, but a bulletin issued by tho New York Agri cultural Experiment Station, U.S.A., supplies a highly interesting and a vory instructive reply. An oxperimont has bnnn in urocrcaa for ten years in that State for the purposo of ascertaining tho truth of tho matter, and_ tho results have becu so conclusivo thdt no fruit growor in that country or in any other can afford to ignore thorn. A Strict Comparison. An orchard of 0} acres, chosen be cause tho Boil and topography woro us far as possible uniform, was dividod into two parts— one part being ploughed each spring, and cultivated from four to seven timed, and tho other only treated b'y tho cutting . of the grass once, sometimes twice, per season. At thu cud of five years the orchard was divided iu quarters by running a lino at right angles to tho first, and tho | treatment of the soil i...

Publication Title: Western Age
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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