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Title: Sunday Herald, The Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 63,582 items from Sunday Herald, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Friendships Renewed With Troops [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Friendships Renewed With Troops Mrs. W. Lockett-Agnew arrived in Sydney during the week to re- new friendships she made with Australian troops whom she en tertained at her London homr during the war. Daughter of the late Field Marshal Sir William Robertsoa who was commander-in-chief o) the British Army of the Rhine, 1919-20. Mrs. Lockett-Agnew ii a sistei of the present Military Commander of the British Forces in Germany, General Sir Brian Robertson. Before she came to Australia, she spent three months with Sir Brian and his family in Berlin, where, she said, conditions wen , in a turmoil. Mrs. Lockett-Agnew will be in Svdney for a fortnight, and will spend this week visiting friends whose addresses she has. She will lunch at the Overseas League on Thursday and hopes that mei whom she met during the war, and whose addresses she has mislaid, will communicate with her there or at the Queen's Club.

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Kardella Gave Boy First Win [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Kardella Gave Boy First Win Officials, trainers, and jockeys crowded round 15-year-old apprentice Brian Killian and his father, Cyril Killian, after the jockey had ridden his first winner, Kardella, at Canterbury yesterday. Killian çomes from a fam- ily that has been closely iden- tified with racing in Sydney i for three generations. j His grandfather was a'' noted trainer at meetings under pony I club rules. i His, father was a jockey and is now a trainer, and an uncle, Mr. .lim Killian, is a stipendiary steward of the A.I.C. Another uncle, Roy Killian, was leading pony jockey in seve- ral seasons. He gave up racing altogether when lie retired as a rider, and now lives in Davistown. Killian is one of the latest ap- prentices to he given his riding ticket. Yesterday's was his ninth mount in a race. 1 In between his track riding in the early mornings, and his work at the stables in the afternoons, Killian still attends school al Daceyville. Schoolmates were waiting to congratulate hi...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"CRIPPLE" LANDS BIG OFF-COURSE WAGERS [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

"CRIPPLE" LANDS BIG OFF-COURSE WAGERS Kardella, who has broken down three times, and was bought for his present owner, Mrs, F. M. Brierty, for £60, landed a £70,000 starting-price coup at Canterbury j'esterday. I A stable follower said last night: "We have had a tre- mendous .win. We backed, him from Cairns to Kal- goorlie-wherever we could get set." Kardella had never before won a race, nor had his 15 1/2-year-old rider, the apprentice Brian Killian. ? Mr. F. M. Brierty, husband of the owner, said he had gambled in buying Kardella, who he had been warned was delicate. ' When the gelding broke down at Woodend (Vic), having his first run for him, it looked as though he had lost the £60 out- lay. "1 wasn't happy about our prospects with Kardella, who had broken down twice under dif- ferent trainers in Sydney as a two-year-old," Mr. Brierty said yesterday. "But my trainer declared that Kardella had definite prospects if given time to become sound. "1 said he. could take as long as he l...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE WOMEN'S VIEWPOINT How Do They Assess The Cost-of-living? [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

THE WOMENS VIEWPOINT How Do They Assess The Cost^of-living? \X/"OULDN'T you like to get a * ' * quiet look at the books of the learned gentlemen who assess the cost-of-living figures? I vyon der if they have noticed the high pi ice of cleanliness these da)s Not onlv toilet soap and blue, and washing soap, up by pence at a time but also the sui charge foi picking up youi bundle ol laundiy if j ou are lucky enough to find a laundiy to wish for >ou Years ago 1 used to polish m> floois and my luinituie at 1/71 a tin now the same brand costs me 3/9 and J ve almost decided no1 to clean the silver ind the brass 1 cant affoid it' Even matches and salt ate dearer, and (hough it might onl) be a penm or a halfpennv. at a time, it all mounts up So it isn t only (he food we cat and the clothes that we put on our backs that cause our allow- ances to vanish so fast Its just everything -K * * T THINK that the knotty prob * lern of school uniforms has been fought out and that most of us agree ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

FROM THE HEART OF LONDON CLASSIC KNITTED FROM AS LITTLE AS 40;3 ¿*tf Right: Button to neck cardigan in watermelon, jacaranda, aquamarine, ¿£?J|j beige, white, vieux rose, sunlight gold. SSW, SW, W, XW, 37/6. WM W Classic sweater to wear with the hutton-to-ihe throat cardigan in watermelon, jacaranda, aquamarine., beige, white, gold, vieux rose. SSW, SW, W, XW, 40/3 IT'S NEVER TOO EARLY TO LAY-BY FOR MINTER _o- o*/<¡ //iy^)V LHj-.br for 47/6 Our I Black Boucle dash out with astrakhan trimming Reminiscent, of the days when fashions ivcre romantic, we've blended their flare and spirit into our 1949 Coals. Superbly cut, with moulded waists and full skirls lo flourish as you walk. In shadcs-of-lhc-woods, wild-cherry, blucpine, meadow-moss, earth-brown, clay, black. XSSW-XIF. LAY-BV FOR ONLY 4/- IIS' £ DEPOSIT -5 MONTHS TO PAY i Sorry, no 'phone o» moil ordert, FIRST FLOOR, THE HOUSE OF CURZON, IN PITT STREET

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SOCIAL NEWS AND GOSSIP Breakfast-Time At The All-Night Clubs [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

SOCIAL NEWS AND GOSSIP Breakfast-Time At The Ail-Night Clubs A GLASS of milk in the early **? hours for MR. and MRS. JOHN COOPER and visiting American MR. HOWARD WINNER who shared his milk with the cat at Sammy Lee's. Mr. Winner is travelling with fishing enthusiasts, Mr. and Mrs. Kip Farrington, and has been photographing their Australian trip. He leaves with them by plane to-night for a month's fishing in New Zealand, before returning to the United States. \4R. RON VICKERY and country visitor MISS ERICA SMITH, of Narrandera, study the menu before order- ing a late supper (or early breakfast) at Sammy Lee's. Miss Smith has been spending a holiday at Cronulla. J ISTENING to the impiomptu dawn floorshow at the *^ Hayden were MISS PAM MYER, of Melbourne, arid MR GEORGE LAWRENCE In the background at right it Parisian designer, MADAME MAUD, of Maud et Nano, who returned io Pans yesterday Mist Myer imll ? etui n to Melbourne on Tuesday Right: BREAKFAST for two at the Hayden for MISS^RUA ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Snows launches the year's big Suit Success Even If you're extra persnickety about fine tailoring, you'll swoon over this Suit. Look at the smooth, moulded back-swing of the Jacket. See that wonderful Skirt-brand-new, intricate, yet so-simple, with dozens of pleats. Feel the fabric. It's fine, strong worsted that's ready for years of wear. Man-tailored, of course. Hand-finished. In light or dark grey, green, and beige. Sizes X.S.S.W. to W. £9/6/-. Sorry, not enough for mail, 'phone orders. Snows' Policy: To bring you the best of all Ihnl's MAU. uMist ti IS new, at the lowest pombl» prioee. 'Phone 914408 v ,

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Out and about WITH JUDY [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

(P^SK^^Ä^W,THJUDY j "\ X 7"E'VE now been out as long ' ' as we were in," cx-P.O.W. John Fuller told me on Tuesday night, when he was celebrating with a large family party at Prince's, on the anniversary of Singapore's fall. In the party, which included John's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John, Sen., and his brother, Malcolm, was also Reg Robson, a fellow P.O.W., now married to John's sister, Vena. Round the room other P.O.W.'s on same celebration were Stewart Ward, with his pretty wife, Jean, and Don Raw. * . . 1HAD a ring from Peter and Ginny Gibbes on Friday to say they have had just two days' notice to leave for Ceylon, where they will be stationed indefinitely. Birdman Peter, of course, will be flying in and out with the airline, MRS. PETER GIBBES but it looks as though it will be some' time before we see that en- chanting creature Ginny again. They left by air yesterday, after making arrangements for their baby car to follow them by ship. . . . JJOUSE-HUNGRY Brian and Marie Louise Boi...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Your Films Are Timed To The Second [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Your Films Are Timed To The Second By APRIL McKEE-WKlGHT '"PHE average two-hour .*- "feature picture is not filmed by guesswork. Tt is important for the producer and the director, with the final theatre screen always in mind, to know right through production how much time has been consumed by what they have done, and how much time is left.' To make this possible a time keeper works over the script, estimating to a few second« how long the action will take .Every speech must be quoted aloud with appropriate pauses for the lighting of cigarettes, long meaning glances, or the ringing of doorbells. ONE time-keeper who works for Metro Goldwyn Mayer is Lauren P. Amcll. who has learned through years o I experience just how long it takes Lionel Barrymore to cross a room, or how long drawling Wallace Beery will take to make his speech. Amcll works with a stop watch, mentally marking off the minutes and seconds it will take for every piece of action. He knows the tempo of the ' various direct...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Cockney wit of a cab driver may become just as famous as the American humour of Donald Duck. London Cab is new film star [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

The Cockney wit of a cab driver may become just as famous as the American -? humour of Donald Duck. London dab is new furn star ONE day soon the Cock- ney wit of London cab driver, William Ran- dall-"Stagger" lo his inti males-may be as famous as the imprecations of Donald Duck. For this 54-ycar-old Londoner and his battered cab are the dominant characters of Britain's first colour film car .toons. On the screen William Randall will be "Bubble"; his taxi, *"Squeek." Part of London life since 1847," when a man called Hansom invented and patented a "machine" for use in the city, the cab-driver has a fund of Cockney wit that makes him different from his counter- parts the world over. Though his vehicle'is more modern than the old hansom cab, which vanished from the London streets at the turn of the century, the laxi-drivcr of to-day is still the same type. He'll loo'k in scorn at a two- penny tip: "What's this, mister, Marshall Aid?" ry*HE story of "Bubble" and '"Squcek" dates back to ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
YOUR GARDEN: The Dainty Iris Is Transformed [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

YOUR GARDEN: The Dainty Iris Is Transformed By WARATAH THEN she was usually an outcast: neglected in crowded corners, straggling through fences. She was known as "Old Flag Lily," in purple, white or light mauve. But her form even then was gracious, her petals dainty. Since'those Prince Charmings, the- hybridists have taken her in hand, she has blossomed into one of the world's loveli- est flowers. One of the best things about Irises is their case of cultivation. All they ask is some vvcll-draincd soil in a sunny position. , ALMOST any kind of soil ' suits them, j/ut generous liming is essential in coastal areas, or elsewhere where acid ground is the rule.. /Animal manures arc best kept away, but to maintain fer- tility a light dressing of bal- anced fertiliser will restore im- poverished soils. The main thing is to ensure thal drainage is good. As loses, carnations, stocks and most shrubs also object to soggy soils in winter, this busi- ness of drainage is one that any gardener shou...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Making Money On The Cheap While "successful" producers bemoan the cost of film production, the amazing King Brothers are making money with "cheapies" costing not more than £20,000. FROM A HOLLYWOOD CORRESPONDENT [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Making Money On The Cheap While "successful" producers bemoan the cost- of film production, the amazing King Brothers are making money with "cheap ies" costing not more than £20,000. ' FROM A HOLLYWOOD '-, CORRESPONDENT fT^HERE still is money in ??- plenty in the making of films, though the lamenta- tions of "successful" pro duccrs arc loud in all the lands lo which Hollywood sends its produce. The Academy Award' win- ner totals his production costs, looks hopelessly at the box-of- fice receipts, then hides his Oscar in the attic and fumbles in his pocket for enough small change to buy a packet of aspi- rin. "Never again," he mutlers disconsolately, "six per cent.; ii would have been better to leave it lo collect bank inter- est." And round the corner the man who's making "quickies" orders another box of Habana Fiimissimos, checks to see ii "The Grinning Gun Moll" net- ted 300 per cent, or only two scvcnty-fivc, slaps has partner on the back and says, "Let's get started: We'll make ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"Life at Buckingham Palace" Princess Margaret told the American Ambassador " is like living in a goldfish bowl." THE P rincess WHO LIVES IN A GOLDFISH BOWL [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

"Life at Buckingham Palace'* Princess Margaret told the American Ambas- sador " is like living in a goldfish bowl" p THE r, TlÏilSSô WHO UVES IN A' GOLDFISH BOWL By ROGER BUNYAN and HAROLD A. ALBERT Always eager to anlicipate a royal romance, London gossip is beginning lo confirm London opinion lhal Priricegs Margaret will marry ihe handsome 22-year-old Marquess of Blandford. A LTHOUGH the rumours are denied officially-as were the rumours preceding announcement of Princess Elizabeth's engagement-¡I seems that Princess Margaret has set her heart on marrying into this Anglo-American fam- ily. One of the Princess's inti- mate friends is Miss Sharman Douglas, daughter of the American Ambassador 'li was to the Ambassador that the Princess confided her view tha( life in .Buckingham Palace was like life in a gold-iish bowl. PRINCESS MARGARET is 1- a curiously independent yoting person, with an excep- tional interest in other people, and an inquisitive zest for ex- perience. The sergeant at...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
... And The Girl Who Played One BY A LONDON CORRESPONDENT [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

... And The Girl Who Played One BY A LONDON CORRESPONDENT THE stage was dim except for the spotlight encirc- ling "the girl at the «rand piano. Her dark head was ? bent, her face rapt as her slim fingers moved smoothly and surely across the key- board. When the lasl full notes had died away the audience rose to its feet in unanimous tribute. But no amount of mere ap |\aiise could pay the homage deserved by this girl's courage and determination. rPHE gill on the stage-who .* had just given a superb interpretation ol' an exacting and difficult piano composition -had only one arm. and thal had been completely paralysed just a few years before. Thirty-six-year-old Dorothy Maynard ->> K<;nt, England, ?K had one prime ambition in life -to be a concert pianist. When the war started, she shelved her dream to become a London ambulance driver. One day in lf)44 when she was inJ the depot, a flying bomb hit the building. She lost her right arm and her left was paralysed. After ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Murder On The North Shore On the list of unsolved murder mysteries on New South Wales police files is the brutal killing in a North Shore train of Francis Cecil Kemmins, popular manager of the Hornsby branch of the Government Savings Bank. The mystery is recalled in this article by JAMES TAYLOR [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

Murder On The North Shore On the list of unsolved murder mysteries on New South Wales police files is the brutal killing in* a North Shore train of Francis Cecil Kemmins, popular manager of the Hornsby branch of the Government Savings Bank. The "mystery is recalled in this article by t JAMES TAYLOR ON the night of January 7, 1922. Kemmins was hit on the head and robbed on a North Shore train between Hornsby and Wah- roonga. He died next day of his injuries. This well-planned and puz- zling crime created a sensation in Sydney-a fact which 1 rea- lised when, as a youthful reporter, 1 pushed my way through the crowd which crammed the coroner's court and overflowed into the street outside on the day of the inquest. * Though the police had a suspect present the evidence against him was so flimsy that the coroner had little hesita- tion in "finding" that the vic- tim had been- slain by "a per- son unknown." rPHAT person, whoevei he * was, had apparently lacked the nerve or opportunity to ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The forbidding fortress which once guarded Botany Bay is now a pleasant home for old soldiers and sailors who form the VETERAN GARRISON OF BARE ISLAND [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

The forbidding fortress which once guarded Botany Bay is now a pleasant home for old soldiers and sailors who form the VETERAN GARRISON OF BARE ISLAND BY HUGH LAMING Twenty-three old soldiers and sailors, veterans of three wars, garrison in sunlit peace and ease the battlements and gunless casements of the fort of Bare Island, guarding Botany Bay, near La Perouse. HERE in the eventide of eventful lives, a little group of men enjoy the warmth of old comradeship and freedom as residents of the Bare Island section of the War Veterans' Home. The War Veterans' Home has the Bare Island fort as a residence for veterans under permissive tenancy from the Commonwealth Government. It has converted the once bare and forbidding island into a pleasant seagirt home which a millionaire might envy. Bare Island fort was built in 1SS5, when there was fear of war with Russia. Great 18-ton muzzle-loading guns were in- stalled. They never fired a shot in anger. Veterans first moved into the fort a few ye...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
If A Well-Dressed Man Offers To Sell You The Harbour Bridge, Snap It Up, Because It's Doing Good Business [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

If A Well-Dressed Man Offers To Sell You The Harbour Bridge, Snap Ii Up, Because It's Doing Good Business By SHAWN O'LEARY IN spile of a war-crealcd deficit oí £410.000 and loan charges totalling £1,000 a day, Sydney Har bour Bridge is a nourishing business concern. Last financial year's income was £352.487. 'iiiving a sur- plus oí £85,297. Present deficit will, at Ibis rale, dis- appear in five years, and the bridge should be debt-free bv I9S5. 'THE day Major de G root 1 galloped along the cause- way and opened the bridge with flashing sabre, he set a seal of excitement to what was one of the most exciting engin- eering triumphs of modern times. The construction ol the Sydney Harbour Bridge has passed into (he city's history. History, howqver, occurs only to be forgotten. Wc arc apt to forget that it is one of the greatest bridges in the world one of the busiest-und cci , lainly one of the safest. As early as 1790 Di Erasmus Darwin predicted, ir execrable verse, an arch bes . Iridi...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Man Who Launched A Hundred Million Pianos One man launched a hundred million pianos into the music salons, drawing rooms and parlours of the world. [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

The Man Who Launched A Hundred Million Pianos By F. W. L. ESCH One mail launched a hundred, million pianos into the music salons, drawing rooms and parlours of the world. HL traiiàlormcd polite social life, and brought the now dying (or perhaps already dead) "musical even ing" to the masses. The man was Frederic Chopin, who was bom 139 years ago this month-on Feb- ruary 22. 1810-and who died on October 17, IS49. Chopin is acknowledged bj many music authorities as hav- ing had the most widespread influence, on piano playing since the development of the modern pianoforte; not except-1 ing greater, composers ol' music lor keyboard instruments like J. S. Bach and Beethoven. Chopin was horn in Poland but lived in Paris most of his' adult life. J_T IS music-still sells in stiel. .*- quantities that if he were alive today to collect royalties he would probably be the rich- est composer in the world, with an annual income running into millions. , According to a Sj'dnej music house, the work...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FISHING AND WHERE [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

FISHING AND WHERE THEORY was severely jolted by the perform- ance of Geoff Kelly at Marine Beach, Manly, last week. Geoff, a mere novice with the casting rod, landed a 16lb schnapper, using whole yellow- tail for bait - a rare feat for a beach fisherman. But fishermen at Marine Beach have been doing well all the week. One party landed a bag of tailer averaging 2½lb and a num- ber of school sharks. The big- gest shark tipped the scale ¡it 60lb. Ken Bennett, fishing from Palm Beach last week, landed a 7lb mulloway, two tailer about 3lb, and a nice flathead. Spear fishermen are holding a   picnic and barbecue at Toowoon Bay, Tuggerah, this week-end. Members are introducing their wives and children to under- water fishing - allowing them to use the masks to view the under- water gardens in safe conditions. Reports are that mulloway are biting well. Narrabeen Beach yielded one of 30lb and several of 10lb, Pittwater one of 65lb, and Spit bridge several good catches of school ...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
REFEREES HIT BACK [Newspaper Article] — The Sunday Herald — 20 February 1949

REFEREES HIT BACK By JACK MUNRO i---? The third man in the ring, Hie referee, has on occasions had lo play a more active roll, and been ' forced to defend himself against attacks by disgruntled boxers. ONE such unscheduled clash was the only bare-knuckle fight I ever saw at Sydney Stadium. It was between former a..iateur middle and heavy- weight) champion, "Snowy" Baker,' and one-time world welterweight champion, Jimmy Clabby, in 1913. Raker, as referee, had given a decision for American boxer "Cyclone" Johnny Thompson against Tim Land. Although referees to-day have an unenviable job, they are not subject to the open abuse that was thrown at them in those days. Jimmy Clabby, who was Thompson's chief second, had passed loud and caustic remark? about Baker throughout the fight. Baker, ' a mild, gentlemanly sportsman, took the abuse un rattlcd, until Clabby entered the ring at the end of the fight. But when Clabby continued to insult him, Baker lost his temper. Without a word, he turne...

Publication Title: Sunday Herald, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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