ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Leader Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 80,560 items from Leader, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
80,560 results
USEFUL WAYS OF USING RICE. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

S .USEFUL WAYS OF USING. RICE. Boiled- tice.-Wash -?]b. of Patna rice and put S it into nbout-,11 quart -of fast-boiling water; let it- boil for ten minutes,- and then move the pot away from the fire to where it can simmer oan: the stoae. for another ten minutes. Take up a few grains with a. spoon and press- between finger and thumb; if the slightest hardness is felt cook: a few minutes-longer aid test again. When- quite done remo\ve saucepan to the sink and let cold water from the tap run into it, stirring with a- 'spoon and changing the water frequently until it is quite clear. Pour into a colandecr and place in a modeate oven to heat and diy through. An occasional stir with a .fork is a -good thing. Each grain must be separate. N.B.-l-The water in which the rice has been boiled is useful for thickenina stews or curries made of cold- meat, from which no gravy exudes. - Pish Pash.-A small chicken or bkuckle of veal, Slb. rice (Carolina), washed, some sliced onions (one or two, acco...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
CHEESE MAKING ON THE FARM. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

CIEESE MAKINC ON IHE FARAM In reply to a correspondent asking for details upon making a few cheeses for fain ily use, a practical correspondent of "The Leader" writce:--Only tihe simplest uten sils were -employed by us in our initiatory efforts at cheese making. Small cheeses are to be ~recommended for beginners. If the necessary amount of milk cannot be ob tained at one milking, choose a cool spell and add the night's milk to the morning's. Place in any vessel large enough-a large tin wash boiler answers every purpose and add the rennet or a tablet which can be bhad at most stores. One tablet for each 100 lb. of milk. A piece of rennet the size of the hand should be previously soaked overnight in a.pint of water, and the whey thus formed added to the milk. Stir well until thoroughly incorporated with the milk. Heat up to about 84 deg., or vntil the curd seems thick enough. Then remove from'the fire and let stand until it ".sets," or thorough coagulation takes place, after which the...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
EMERGENCY MEALS. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

SEMERGENCY MEALS. There are plenty of plain, nourilshing dishes that can be prepared beforehand, and ret in. the larder ready for lunch as needed, ~o that cthe bu-y worker is not interrupted in her taoks ts cook and prepare .a simeal: Meat pics a hd-moulds are simpld arlnd ~in. pensive to make. Shin of beef is very cheap, aad often despised by . hotekcepersa ; , but, wl:en carefully cookedl, it is deliciously tender. The butcher, too, often has plenty of "pieces" tlhat hlie is glad to sell for a few pence, and these can be made into moulds or potted mea.t. that taste every bit as good as if theby were made withl the finest steak. Mfeat pie can be made with any kind of. meat, but I use ahin of bedef. CPut into asmall pieces enoughi to fill your pie dish; but put thelm flrst into a stone jar, with a little ppper and salt, and just cover with water. Place a saucer over the .top, or tie on grease proof paper, and put the jar in the oven.. Let the meat simmer three-quarters of an hour. t...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
VARIATION IN MILK QUALITY. PRINCIPAL CAUSES. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

VARIATION IN MILK QUALITY. PRINCIPAL CAUSES. l'h'e importance of recognising the varia tions in the quality of milk cannot .be over -rated.. Of the factors which tend to pro duce suech variations, the length of time since calving is one over which no control can be exercised. The loss of Imilking time owing to calving is, on an average, from six to eight, weeks. This leaves, roughly, ~the usual 300 days as the length of the milking period. The variation in the qual ity of milk generally divides itself into about three equal periods. During the second period the milk is about 17 per cent. richer in fat than during the first, and diur ing the third it is about 46 per cent. richer than during the first. The term "variation in quklity" has in practice almost become limited to the vari ation in fat present in the milk, though the albumin and casein and the adh and suligar should also be taken into consideration. Since; however, the ash and, sugar are found under widely varying condition ...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PUDDINGS FOR THE THRIFTY. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

PUDDINGS FOR THE THRIFTY. Quake!r or Rolled Oat PTidding.-Put about two handfuls of the. oats into a pie di-h, add about a pint of water (cold), stir well, then 8tand on the hob or ill. the oven until the water is absorbed; stir every now and nagain, to prevent getting lumpy; whecn th:e water is absorbed, add one pint of milk, sugar to t. te, a little gratedl -ginger or nutmeg. Put into oven and biake to a rich brown. A little butter or an egg will im pro?e the taste. SBreaderumb Pudding.-Put a .layer of syrup into a pie dish, a thin layer of fine-chopped suet, covered with a layer of breadcrtunbs; repeat the process, laying syrup, suet and crumbs alternately unxmtil tile dish is nearly full, then cover with a -little milk, ahdd-a small piece of butter, and grate over some nutmeg or gunger. Bake to a . rolden brown. Wholesome Br?d. Pudding. Place any odd crusts or pieces of stale breod into a lpie dish and .allcw to soak: shoul the bread abso:rb all the water, add a little more or a...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
PROVIDING FOR FODDER. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

PhOVIDING FOR FODDER. The lettars in "The Leader" by practical men on this subject are very instructive, and I am (a Western district correspon dent) sending you a few -rotes. It used to be. the custom with us tb depend oa rains in February that produced a fair flush of young grass a'bout.the beginning of MIarch-a sort of minor -second spring. But sometimes it does not come, and when il comes at the new year its effects are nulli fled by the succeeding dry and hot -wea ther. The consequence of this is that we are now more inclined to adopt a system not so much at the mercy of the seasons. Mfany adopt the system of growing a crop of hay, which, though not a milk produc ing food, yet keeps the cows. in good con dition. One who was very short of grass kept .his cows going with a sheaf and a half of hay each daily for no less than four months. Others have used maize, and a few beet roots anid mangels. Some are sowing maize, a little-each week or so, so as to have a succession of availab...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CHILDRENS COLUMN [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

T1H.q CHBIDREJS CO L.UM r RULES FOR COMPETITIONS. All1 manuscript must bear name, address and age of sender, clearly written, thus: - Name.... . .. . .. . .... ..... Age ..... .. .. ..... . .. . Glass (A. or B.)........ .... .. No Competitor to be over 10 years of age. Com petitions to be neatly written on one side of the paper only. No help to be received from other .people. Children are expected to honorably cli serve this rule. All letters are to be addressed to "Cinderella," "The Leader" Office, Melbourne., If enclosed in open envelopes marked ".MSS. for publication," they can. be sent for one penny up to 2 oz. In awarding prizes, "Cinderella" takes into ac count, not only the corerctness of the auswers, but the neatness of the manuscript and the age of cbmpetitors.

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

Bs aroo a i_ 7 - '·· , This beautiful Suite, which we have called *he "Stonroy" Suite, I is the last word rii Up to Date Bedrobm Furniture. C6n structed entirely-of Solid Oak, thoroughly and naturally sea soned' irour own yards, made by skilled White Labor in our j .itzroy Factory.'- Thoroughly modern in every detail, this fine Suite is an acpiisition inr any home. - 5 ft. Wardrobe,-fitted with beautifully. bevelled mfirror on inside of door (see llustratiorn);.4Uft. Duchesse Dressing Table, has lovely landscape iwling - mirror; Waish Stan&f has tiled back, the tiles harmontising nicely iwith the oak. All fittings in Oxidised * designs. Call to See it, or Write I Great Gift at Only Country Orders Promptly EB Attended to. "The Home Furnishers Where Your Credit is Good," GERTFUPE STREET FITZROY. ._'J & L. E .UTY'S -AYOURI Tihe article which <excels all otheis in improving the beauty of- the skin is natura' ly and .deoervedly * boauty's Pavourite. This ii as ...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

FILL N THE HOW 8HOWING THE FINEST RANGE OF SUITINGS IN AUSTR4LIA. COUPON Thousands of newv Patterns, direct from -the English, Scottish,. Irish and Australian At Once, ~or ou, most e??- Looms, await your selection. The variety is great--the quality unquestionable-the value ,,,? ~io, f atoon THE. unprecedented. Our pure Wiool Real Indigo Serges are the Finest of thee World's. Productions. cluding our platent correct BEST MEASURE CHART VALUE - and IN TUCE- /.. TAPE, WORLD. "Ee COMPLi~'E. Eve- . ALL FREE. W~Je Guaranttee. ' , '? Specially and Carxefully Tailorea to your Order." :" ?:, ".:i ..:' _The GreatBest TailoZring Offer of the Age. .:· : ·.. ·-: ,:ai .. ij~ i: .... J To advertise our Wonderful Value in "LONDON" :" , .0,TAILORING, to ev~ery man inAustralia we are PRE SENTING-. i " " ]i :: . • , . , ~::'':~:• ?...;: · .. - : j iiiii.~iiii E TA T~U ~ ~ _____ -WIlT.I-I ALL LONDON ORDER SUITS. : ' You have unlimited choice of Fabrics. Shall we forward you our patterns .and self-measur...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

I B ne Twill Worsted Suots (Ready to wear). •You'll say good-bye once and for all to clothes troubles and t?he Tailor's B.ig Bill thef irst time _you put on a Phoenitx Re??dly .Tailored Blue Twill Suit. 'It will fit you like the best of made to order garments, for sizes are scientifically graded to <suit men of all figures. You'll like the rich, all wool, long lasting, fadeless fabric in which the suit is tailored. Youll find the style correct, smart, 4~5?5 up to the minute, and you pay-only When -ordehing by mail, please state waist, -chest and i~ide leg measurement, or write for forms, with catalogue, free. Phoenix Ciothiig Co., 347-9 KING-STREET, MELBOURNE. •ones? (Op. Flagstaff Gardens). gI I FOR HIGH CLASS " ? /. .. . : ·7 TAILOr(ING -:.;~ :, : :: · , M· I:.BE RCERY9 :: .. . ? :,:.!! · . _-- .v ··.: :' II TS 511 E 5~H. The Latest :Novedlties in 6u itings and Neckwear. Boots in all the best makes-EnriglIsh, American and Colonial. AALL 1W LBLG OC PLINEFDERSsReET~ 1WheL...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GIANTS IN THE SOUDAN. A SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

GIANTS IN THE SOUDAN. A SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE. The Rev. C. Lea-Wilson affords some in-'. teresting particulars of his work in a di,,; trict of the White Nile, a thousand miles south of Khartoum. "It was only at the beginning of last year," 'he said, in con versation with Reuter's representative,q "that a first attempt was made to pene. trate to the west of the-river .into the Ba'hi-el-Ghazal. We travelled here foi about 200 miles and found the natives very suspicious, and in some cases much fright-' ened. Dusky figures darted away into the' forests on either side of the track as we approached, the people often running away| helter-skelter, throwing their loads and be longings on the path. They are not, how ever, hostile, and eventually we fixed on a. place in a large clearing in the forest for our station. Here we have lived and worked since. "In the neighborhood are about 8000 people, known as Jieng, who are among th. tasllest tribes in the world. They are jet black, typical negroes...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE JAPANESE PEASANT. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

: THE JAPANESE PEASANT. No more industrious and thrifty soul exists on this plane than the Japanese peasant. "All work and no play" is his lot from one year's end to another. Soon after sundown a hush falls over street and house. A "tub," a frugal meal, a pipe, and the people are asleep. Which is not sur prising, seeing that they rose with the dawn and have toiled in the fields ever since. There is no social life in the Japanese village, because there is no leisure. Wife and daughters are busy in the "paddies" with father, andthe :boys. Squires and country magnates are' institu tions unknown in Japan-though now looming, in a dim sort of. way, 'on the horizon. On feast days,. with bell and rosary, the long-robed priest comes to the humblest door, to sblicif alms; but rare indeed is the parson with a thought for the social welfare of his:cure. Occasionally a matsuri arrives to break the monotony, when one may dance with departed spirits in the twilight; but every laborer with a few se...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COMPETITION RESULTS. December, 1913. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

COMPETITION RESULTS. D)ecember, 1913. Clans A.--Fir~t prize (5/), Robert S. Byrnrs. 3S Elm-street, Northcote; hon. mention, Eilcen Crumpler, Bamawm, Central Rochester. Class B.--First prize (5/), Gwladys Atkinson, Taminick, GClenrowan; hlon. mention, Ronall B. Campbell, Benalla (a very neat letter), and Moran M'Keand, Bryn Gwyn. Cockatoo Creek. 'Thle foilowir.ng comnetitors are commnended for good work:--tordon Anderson, Erica Jones. Jean Nichols, Agnes Foster, Maggie James, Dulcie George, Doris Graham, May Mt. Fish, Horace Rudd, Ruth Dew, May Watkins, Philip .Smith, Marjorie Woodford, Constance Harris, Roy Melville, Clyde Ros, May Wilton and Johlnf Gardiner.

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHY SEA LORDS STRUCK. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

WHY SEA LORDS STRUCK. Some details are given of the strike of the Lords of the Admiraltyv on account of the arbitrary aetion 'of Mr. Churchill. "The version given by one, is that while touring, round our naval defences Mr. Churo?hill listened t'o some grievances of a junior officer in the flying branch against his superior officer, and then sent for the latter officer and delivered his judgment in the matter. "The senior officer went balck, and re ported to the Commander-in-Chief, w.ho in turn communicated with his official superiors in Whitehall. Whatever may be the exact details, the First Lord clearly put [himself in the wrong, or the Sea Lords would not have been first forced to resign and afterwards been induced to withdraw their resignations. "Mr. Churchill seems rather to look upon himself as a Commander-in-Chief of the Navy. This is a mistake; the civil head of the department in Whitehall has nothing to do with the command of ships and men, beyond 'being responsible to Parli...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
JOHN L'S PHILOSOPHY. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

JOHN L'S PHILOSOPHY. John L. Silliivan" the heavy weight prize-: fighter, is opposed to blhe moderln.woimani. An Unclimbable Gate Constructed of Iron Piping and Circles of Banrbcl Wire. "Modern women! 'Hul !" he says, "I'm doead against 'em. Too much society. Too much t?hlinkin'. about what other men think webout their lo6d~s, an' not. enough albout wihat their husband's .thinkhi' ~ibou:nt their chalracter." HIere is the bruiser's philosophy:-- "lf' you want to make good ii blhe world, let the booze alone; lot ,women alone until you feel like 'you want to get married; work hard.ait the job you're on, no matter what lit is; don't get the fool notion in your head 6hat 'you ouglt to go to college; an' keep out-of polit ies." J1ohn L. Sullivan was the gre?atst national .hero that the United kStates 'has ever ipssessed (next to 'Lincoln), and some years ago it was a distinotion to shake .iands withl a man whlo had shaken' lIands with .him; On one of ,his visits to England ihe was introdk...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DARWIN'S THOROUGHNESS. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

DARWIN'S THOROJC#HNESS. Henri Fabre _the naturalist tells in the "Fortnight Review" a characteristic story about Charles Darwin and himself. Darwin wanted to explain the "homing" instinct of bees, and induced Fabre to begin a series of experiments with that purpose in view. A regular plan of compaign was drawn up. Marked bees were placed in a dark box and carried away from the hive win the opposite direction from that in which they were finally liberated. The box was repeatedly turned about, so that How the Wire is Fixed Around Circles. Conveying the Rich Earth to the Pulsator, which Finally Discovers the Diamonds. THE SOUT H AFRICA N LA'B'OR PROBLEM. A MINE AREA IS GUARDED BY BARBED WIRE. the inmates would lose all sense of direc tion. Every possible means was taken to render useless any known or conceivable method of obtaining one's bearings. The bees were even placed within an induction coil in the effort to confuse them. The re sult of a long and elaborate series of tests was ni...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WHAT SHOULD ONE DO? [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

WHAT SHOULD ONE DO? Now and again a hard case confronts you. Imagine yourself in the motor omnibus. A woman enters-fumbles for her money-and has lost or forgotten her purse. She hasn't the bus fare. She is well dressed, but 'hasn't a penny in cash on her. The conductor, of course, de mands the penny. Now,. what is the courteous man on the omnibus to do? Shall he-well, confound it-what shall he do? I put the case before a friend of kindly disposition but rough manners, and he confessed that he would never do it again. He sprung the penny ior tne penniless woman, and she sniffed, stopped the bus, and ran away. Can you-as a gentleman-offer a penny -to a stranger, a lady-in an omnibus? Well, I did it recently. She got on at my corner, and produced half a sovereign for the fare. The conductor couldn't do it. The whole omnibus seemed to look the other way. !nd for the moment it seemed that the lady must get off-with the half-sovereign that could not be turned into a penny. .1 may have don...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LITERARY GOSSIP. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

LI HERAY GOSSIP. In "Below Stairs" Mrs. Alfred Sidgwick has taken for the subject of her story the troubles and trials of domestic service, and has shown the possibility of incident and adventure under conditions which are rot usualy considered to possess the atmo sphere of romance. She retains, however, an element of realism, and does not descend to the aid of exaggeration. HIer heroine, Priscilla Day, is not out of t'he ordinary range, and the circumstances of her life are portrayed with a fidelity of truth. One of the daughters of a poor family, she has to go out to service, and passes through many vicissitudes before she finally reaches the haveni of a happy and suitable mar riage. She has varied experiences with her mistresses, and finds in alleges'ocj-i thing to endure. ier wos. tr .4It- "t occasioned through the m ciousne s of a German governess, but sh qInY1es fhe un pleasantdess of an ordeal, takes the shape of a wrongful imiiutafr honesty. Priscilla is always a girl, thoug...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE NEW CAPITAL OF INDIA. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

THE NEW CAPITAL OF INDIA. Concerning the new Indian capital, Sir Charles Crosthwaite, a well-known Indiari official, says that "To transfer the capital of India to Delhi, is sheer nonsense. What the Governmen.t will do is this: It will _our out vast sums of money to build some sort of new city there, and evcitually the place will be abandoned. The ~te chosen, to begin with, is an unhealthy one, and then it is at an enormous distance from the sea. It is obvious to anyone who has over considered the mat:ter for : moment that the capital of British ildia must necessarily be a seaport. It is there that in case of trouble reinforcemehts would need to be sent. MIoreover, in a great seaport capit'al, there will always' be an in dependent European society which will re present pu'blic opinion. In the inew Delhi t'here will be nothing but Governiment offi cials, who will live there during, the cold weather, and go up to the hills: at Simla in the summer. The same members of Council, the same...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LITERATURE THE FIRST PITT. [Newspaper Article] — Leader — 24 January 1914

THE FIRST PITT, :To write the biography of Chatham a man must be something of a hero wor shipper. He wa. no scientific statesman to be. dissected and explained, but the most dazz!ing man of action among political Englishmen, the most inspiring orator, the most terrifying antagonist who ever spoke in the English Parliament, the guiding will and genius of a whole people who turned defeat and extremity into triumph and Empire. Reviewing Mr. Basil Williams's "Life of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham," the "Saturday Review" renimarks- that the net effect of the book is not to alter the traditional view or to paint a new picture of Chatham, but rather to fill in the details of the outline which the pen of Macaulay drew for all time. Occasionally, of course, Macaulay goes astray, and Mr. Williams might have given more care to confuting the story that the Boy Patriots tried to come to an understanding wi'th Walpole, and offered to screen him from .prosecution 'if he would get them offices. He ...

Publication Title: Leader
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x