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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

tO, i Indian Advocate. 59 medals, the scapulars that theytna'd received fr6mi tfieir com mon benefactress. The most hardened found it usually impossible 'to resist her solicitations to return to God. Among the most inveter ate cases she found was a man who, iii the days of '93, had stained his hands with the blood of the martyrs. While a number of these were' one day proceeding to the fatal spot, where revolution was to become drunk anew in the blood of the country's best citizens, they sang a hymn to the iMost Blessed Virgin. One stanza (particularly struck this wretch, and during the balance of his life he sang it each day, at least in a humming tone. When 'his last hour arrived he found Sister Rosalie at his side, and to allvher urging said that he needed 'no priest, that his fate was sealed. But charity, that covers a multitude of sins, also triumphs over and covers with its mantle the greatest sinners. After renewed prayers he con sented to receive a confession, made his peace ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

"E""- 'WP- 60 The Indian Advocate. fmrp : . h' Po tf . know; the only person in whom I have confidence. Take that money, that I may be at rest as to the future of my child. " Next the sister spoke to him about his soul, and proposed to send for a priest, that peace might be made with God. s" need no priest to settle matters with God," answered the old man. "You are there, and no one represents God better than you, and we can easily settle our affairs for him together." It took some time to convince the ragman that Sister Rosalie was neither a notary public nor a priest; yet she took the money, and in exchange for this accommodation the dying sinner agreed to admit and speak to the pastor. Fifteen thousand francs were drawn ' from under the beld ticking; a reconciliation was effected between the ragman and his wife, and death closed the scene with Sister Rosalie recit ing the prayer for the departing. Attached to the house over which Sister Rosalie presided was a school, in which the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

The Indian Advocate. 61 and loved her book so well;, why are you not Jhe same? Sis ter, X. go security for thepod conduct of my little friend," whp fortjhwjth hastened to her place, with the fixed resolution, often .broken, we suppose, to do better, and at night, when J:H.e supper was spread and little Marie was asked what about her school to-day, Sister'Rosalie was blessed and praised by a flattered mother, who had supposed herself forgotten, but who was now delighted that some one thought of her. . As chanty is never satisfied, and constantly seeks to ex pand, Sister Rosalie determined to add a nursery to the phar macy and the school, Here she collected alfthe little things of the district whose mothers were out at service; she required .them to come at certain hours in the .morning and afternoon to feed their babes, and, despite all opposition, insisted that employers should give the poor mothers time to fulfill this duty of parental love. It required but a step to create an asyl...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

P :f 62 The Indian Advocate. rmr-i?PfW ?'TrvrwOTr3W5T5jnrTW?! f LI halls, in which all her former pupils, then apprentices or in service, could meet, enjoy an afternoon's amusement, sing innocent songs or pious hymns, and under the tuition of 'the Sisters and intelligent charitable ladies who were taken into the work, were enabled to continue and partially perfect their previous instruction. Sister Rosalie knew them all by name, where they were working, hoW'much they received, and how they were doing. This undertaking she perfected by the asso ciation known as that of "The Good Counsel," wherein the oldest members were united, and each given a certain nutriber of younger girls to oversee and instruct, to encourage and assist. There was a certain Sunday in each month when Sis ter Rosalie assembled all her children, young and old, for the distribution of rewards or the issuing of reproach, the latter always -a painful but sometimes an imperative duty. When forced to be severe in her w...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

Fywwwy The Indian Advocate. '63 r: I LOCALS 4 .. 5? ? The all-absorbing topic these days is Statehood for Oklahoma. I Several of-our Alumni have returned, and they, seem to be happy to be once more among us. . , Died, Jan. 13. at Sacred Heart, Rev. Fr. G...P. Dugal,- a short notice of-which will be found 'on next page. , . . i, The bill to create the Territory of Jefferson out of the Indian Terri tory was referred to a sub-committee on territories.' Our Industrial School received some new recruits. They are all doing well and are satisfied with everything, out-door exercises especially. The-new Monastery was blessed by Rt. Rev. Father Abbot' on Uhe anniversary day of the destruction. May this blessing insure its durability! The total area of the Cherokee Nation, according to the most recent government surveys, is 4,449,019 acres. This amount is what is left of more than .80.000,000 acres from first to last. - Representative Curtis has introduced a bill in Congress, permitting Heirs ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

ttJrSiS iK3rp'"" The Indian Advocate. W I' it Hi 64 It i. f St krf ,. hT.r JiiA 1 1 ' 1 - Died, January 19, igo2, Peter, Silver, a full-blood Pottawatomie In dian, at.the age of 25. He was buried on the 21st. R. I.' P. Perhaps jt a large percentage of the Catholic population of Oklahoma and the Indian Territory was to migrate, Congress.cpuld then see its way clear to admit them to statehood. v , Mr. Israel Rodd and Mrs. Maggie Hardin (nee View), two Pottawato mie Indians, were made one on the 22d of January. May happiness and , prosperity bje their lot in this their second venture. 9" Side by side the other day in one of our daily papers appeared the announcements of the suicide of a New Yorker at ninety, and a mule in a Pennsylvania coal mine, age not given. The positions may have been acci dental, but nothing could better illustrate the perversity of nature in man and beast. t , Oklahoma now has 2,055,890 acres of school land reserved. The an nual income of these-lands is about $3...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

-m'm'tmimi"tiXW!f'''mvn'' ' ??W!ir"rrV i'5fSJfW' T The Indian Advocate X. , Vl. XIV. EEMUAftY, I9t2. N. 2 wtiicri SHALL IT BE? N Winch shall it be, lads, which shall it be ? , '"bod or tlfd'devil, bond or Jree ? Will b boldlv and cheerfully take your stand IJL. " ' ' ' h f With the chosen few, with.the noble band ' Who are steadfastly doing all they can ' For God and the right and fallen man ? Or will vou sink, debased and blind, To herd with the ruck of humankind God, the deil, bond or free S ., 'Which shall it be, lads, which shall it be ' ' '' i ia ; i Which shall it be ? The home life sweet, ' jr"' f , Gay with the palter of tiny feet; ', Or the squalid tap-room, grimy and grim ' The drunkard's curse, or the children's hymn? " f Wrecked lues, or the strength that never flags ? ' . Peace and plenty, or ruin and rags? t Which shall it be, lads, which shall it be ' to Which shall it be ' Two paths lie here r The right leads upward, the left, ah! where' ' Others may give you counsel...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

34 Tun Indian Advocate. 'jtiP: The .Catholic Church 23PJV X$ xxxxx and the-; Indian, j; k r at - .1 i 1 1 1 . That the Government has made a -mess of it in attempt ing to educate the Indian children with a view to civilizing them is the conclusion reached by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, as set forth in his- annual report' to Congress. We learn from that report that there are 113 boarding schools for the Indians, with an average attendance of something over 16,000 pupils ranging from 5 to 21 years of age, who have been brought together from the cabin and the tepee. Educa tion, to be of any value to these children of parents who are emerging from the nomad state, should be of a character to make them self-reliant and self-supporting. The training these young Indians receive has just the opposite effect. It makes them dependent and leaves undeveloped whatever nat ural abilities they may possess for wrestling with the difficul ties with which they will have to contend later on in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

m vtqnyr' t "j v f ' i The Indian Advocath. 35 i & light and, all the modern conveniences. All of the. necessities of life are given him .and many o.f the luxuries. All of this without money and without price or the contribution of a single effort of his own or of his people.!' Is it any wonder that.-a young man .sprung from a race that ,has alwrys been averse to manual labpr,should be utterly demoralized by such a system of ,cpddling? When his so qalled ".education" js completed hefeturn.st to his early" sur roundings, where he finds- everything ,the reverse of what he has. been accustomed to.' He has no real training fo what, should be his life wprk. He is not a good Indian in the sense that, he knows how to earn a 'livelihood as his fathers did, be fore him, nor is he, thanks fto his ."education," fit to be a farmer.or a; mechanic. He. is simply in a (air way -of becoming a first-class loafer. , i - , ttl , , , , We learn from Commissioner Jones that in, the lsitwent.y years ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

tJTWrW!mrW -Trne w- - jt-tejtrt 36 Thk Indian Advocate. States dealt with this important question at their meeting in Washington. To those who are familiar with the Indian ques tion it is known with what injustice Catholic Indian schools have been treated. Anti-Catholic bigots, wholly iguoring the good work done by .these schools in the cause of civilization, made an outcry against Government aid to them. As Senator Vest put it in a speech delivered in the United States Senate on April 7, 1900, these bigots "believe that an Indian child better die an utter unbeliever or an idolator, even, than to be educated by the Society of Jesus or in the Catholic Church." As a sensible person, Senator Vest did not take this view. He recognized that the winning of' the Indians to civilization was what the;. Indians was most concerned with. ' w If the Catholic Church, who fifteen hundred years Jago tamed and civilized the Goths and Vandals, who' had broken up the Roman Empire, can make the wild Si...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

T"'""5Pp"iV7Ty' Thk Indian Advocate. pT 37 r- not see in all my journey, which lasted for several weeks, a single school that was doing any educational work worthy of the name of educational work unless it was under the control of the Jesuits." Senator Vest found schools with 1,500 enrolled, and not ten in attendance, except pn the days when the Indian agent distributed free meat, when every one of the 1,500 put in an appearance. He also found schools conducted by broken down Protestant ministers and politicians receiving $1,200 a year, with a house free, for work which was shamefully neg lected,. To what extent this work was carried may be judged from this extract from Senator Vest's speech: "When I cross questioned them (the ex-Prntestant ministers and the broken down politicians) I found their actual attendance was about three to five in the hundred in the enrollment." The whole Indian system was simply a huge bunco game practiced on the Government, which had to foot bills for wh...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

38 Tun Indian Advocate. o uplifted' them.' In dealing with our own Indians she is simply duplicating what she has donfe in so many other lands: If anti-Catholic bigots, who have'tnade a muddle of the Whole Indian business, fail in their endeavors to impede her in her noble mission, the Catholic Church will eventually place the Indian on a high plane of civilisation. What she has already accomplished is a guarantee of what she can do in the future. Senator Vest hasSvitnessed some of the fruits of her berievo lent influence upon'oiir Indian tribes, and thus testifies to'them : "The Jesuits navelevated the lndianvwherever they have been allowed todo'so" 'without ifiterfernce of bigotry and fanaticism and theowa'rdice ofr1He insectiverous politicians who are afraid of the A. P. A. and the votes that can be cast against them in their districts andr Stat.es. They" have''made him a Christian, atid a workman able to support himself and those dependent up"bn him. ' Gb to the Flathead Reserva...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

"7Tr TV.'"' "J" T Tuc Indian Advoca'ie. , 39 0 r f p ii n rwr-! - v caps, boots and shoes, and carrying on a blacksmith shop, may not be able to playa game of football as well as the grad uates of the Indian school at Carlisle, but they have been trained in a school in which they have learned the lesson that to, work is man's duty. , Having learned that lesson, they have placed their feet on paths that will lead them and their chil- , dren's children to the most advanced civilization. WHile the Government is spending millions on a system . of education which, according 'to tthe official report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, does riot educate, it would be a pityif anti-Catholic bigotry should succeed in depriving the schools that are really civilizing Indians of Government aid. Freeman' s Journal. ' M Words That Are Misnomers. Imp originally 'merfnt a child. ' 'h ''' Starve origiliallymeant td die. h : f Meat originally meant any kind of food. v ' Acre originally meant a fiel...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

y"y'p!Witsr!!5?3!?5T V 40 The Indian Advocate. c ' fclrt ?? Iff Indian Chief as an Artist. Mack Bear's Deerskin Painting of the Details of the Custer Massacre. On the deerskin covering of a tepee in the Brule Sioux encampmentat Glen Island is drawn, in blue ink, a medley of men and horses. The picture in itself is so strange that it arouses the curiosity of thousands of visitors, but few of them know that it has any significance other than as a mere illus tration of Indian life and warfare, says the New York Mail " and Express. The artist of the deerskin painting is Black Bear, whose family is housed under it. Black Bear explained that the figures on the deerskin are not horses and men merely, but only details in a representation of an historic event the mas sacre of Custer and his men by the hordes of Sioux under Sitting Bull. "I was in that fight," Black Bear explained. "I was a young man then, and I remember it was fhe biggest thing in my life. I think I make a picture of it, so ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

' YZrwrrrFW!CW ' "iJf" wy ""iifyjyvwwiyiT Tr--n -w - !Fjt-fjiHjtgS& -fJt-mnfrr rm- r ' W The Indian Advocate. g 41 Long Hair must die and he knows it. That horse he rides; ii is killed, but he fights on. I know that because I see it." Around the edge of the picture are rows of Indians hold ing rifles to their shoulders and all aiming at the center, where Custer stands alone. "These men all Sioux," said Black Bear, "but they are different tribes. The pgalalas stand here. The Brules here. They sometimes fight each other, but now they all fighting against Long Hair." , Crude as the pictbre is, it conveys an admirable idea of a multitude against a handful. Nothing could better illustrate the force of superior numbers than the circle of feather bedecked savages closing in relentlessly on the one hrave man who is given the place of importance in the center. The ar- L tist is a erood-natured Brule, who is more than six feet tall. pv r. , .,.,,,,,,..,. l . 1 ne coraiai way in wnicn ne s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

Kyiy "" t -cwatvr lj iim TT - 42 The Indian Advocate. r?. & 'tV ES A' p. fi Q Every Man His iwn Poj , T J When Jepthi the Galaadite, who ruled Israel during a period of six years, had defeated the Ephraimites, many of the conquered took to flight; but the Galaadites guarded the fords of the Jordan and inquired of every man who essayed to pass if he were an Ephraimite; if the answer was in the negative, 'he-was further required to pronounce the word "shibboleth," which means "an 6ar of corn." The Ephraimites, -by a pecu liarity of- their speech, mispronounced the word and said "sibboleth;" on the occasion referred to this peculiarity -led to theif detection and death. At the present day, if any one would be considered broad-minded and worthy df regardhe must adopt the fashionable shibboleth. The catchword of our times is "Liberty." If he cannotutter this Word in the popular sense he is called a fossil, an obscurantist, and a sup porter of Papal pretensions! Yet liberty is a glori...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

(7 The Inoian Advocaie. 43 "'supposed totapply'only to religion. If' a man 'should apply it 'to (forms of i government heis tailed not an apostle of liberty, bul: an anarchist; iff he chodsei to! think that his neighbor has jimore wealth than he has a rightrto, and so thinking proceed -to help, himself on the plea ofxliberty, it will not avail him withf themagistrate. In short, Lilejty must not have its own nvay in the -world or in the service of Mammon; but such 'privilege is hers by right in the world of religion! This is not over-stated, for the following description of Liberty appeared '..in the Spectator of February 16, igoi: 'True liberty consists inthe right to think as one pleasesto holdiwhat opinions one Ahkes, and ito convince others, if one can, of those opinions. iIt involves the right to hold opinions which other people hold tb be wrong, as well as those which they hold to be good. Action, of course, is another matter. Actions cannot be as ' free as thoughts, or the wor...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

TJWWWWVlH2r5w "V T"" CTTW" 44 The Indian Advocatc. I: fe' bIS I n lldLSJ .".;': Christian at all. At best he can but proclaim the essentials of believing in the existence of God and the binding nature of the dictates of natural religion. Even the pagan philoso phers of Greece and of Rome got as far as this. It would seem, then, that the acceptance of essentials, in the sense advocated by the sect, is equivalent to rejecting revelation. I hesitate to say that the sects and the Church of England are loyal to the Bible, even by profession, in these days of Higher Criticism. But if we grant that they do so profess, it is a gross inconsistency on the part of the sects to leave every man to his own fads and fancies on the plea of adhering to vague essentials4, and equally so for the English Church to do the same under the plea of comprehensiveness. St. Paul held a far different doctrine when he wrote: "I wonder that you are so soon removed from him that called you into the grace of Christ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

w-JVJT! rprpocT Thk Indian Advocate. 45 is the judgment of the mind of the course taken or to be taken. No man is born with a ready stock of knowledge on any subject whatever; he has to learn all that he knows; his learning is acquired with pain and difficulty. For him, as for all,-the path of knowledge is strewn with many pitfalls, and the seeker often slips. He holds a view for a period and abandons it in favor of one which, as he believes, is more true. His notions of science and art, if any, are seldom fixed and unalterable; they grow, and are subject to weeding as well as addition. Knowledge and the recognition of truth by the intellect guide a man's actions in all his ways. With partial truth he will adopt one mode of action; with fuller truth he will adopt another. Now, if conscience is but the intellect considering knowl edge in a certain order, it, too, must vary in proportion to the knowledge it contemplates. But just as the mechanic seeks guidance in his trade, so must th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

'ttp'wt$tp'r 46 The Indian Advocate ffi ft", 5 a, w without guidance; therefore conscience must be guided. This guidance is found in the Church which Christ founded and 'bade all His followers to hear. By undoing the work of -sin, ' Christ "did not thereby make the consciences of those who be lieve in Him infallible; but in His wisdom He knew the neces sity of an infallible guide to direct men in that most difficult work they have to do, the working out of their salvation. He therefore appointed an infallible teacher whom we call the Pope. Those who set aside this teacher are forced to seek another; they set up 'their own little Vatican on the hill of pride; they make themselves popes under the title of con science; in effect they hold that man is the measure of 1 God. Thus of the major part of our countrymen outside of theOne Told,, it is no freak of fancy, but simple fact, tot say that every man is his own pope. St. Andrew's Magazine. ' x 'One of the miseries of our day is the ten...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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