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Title: Bismarck Tribune Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,300 items from Bismarck Tribune, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

A VALLEY OF DEATH The Land of Sugar Cane and Corn a Wide, Still Waste of Water. A Gin House Swept Away by the Great Flood, and 120 Per­ sons Browned. An Inoffensive Traveler Falls a Victim to the Delusion of a Crank. R. TT Merrick, a Prominent Democrat, Takes a Hand in the Star Route Prosecution. The Big Over/lout. NEW OBLBAIHI March 90.—The Times Democrat's Troy Landing special savs a boat went down on Catahonta lake with 106 head of cattle. The water continues to rise at the rate of 3% inches per day, and the hills of Catahonta parish are covered with destitute .people. At Lindell's place on Black river a man named McAdams asked to be taken aboard of a passing boat with his family, and some stock, as the water threatened the destruction of his buildings, but on finding there was no room for his stock he declined to embark. As the boat left the huge waves raised by the wind were shaking the house to its foundations. The Times-Democrat's •steamer has entered Black river and is steam...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

CLARK'S FOBK HBSB8 Gen. Brisbin, in ft:Mif^.$!&£ to the New York Herald says: "I lately read in the Herald quite along telegram, describing the Clark's Fork mines of Montana, and announcing "new and valuable discoveries. These ues have kmgf been khown to me, and I am glad to see the Herald leading the way in making them known to the world. As long ago as 1876,! Whteh.1 ifeommanded the military forces at Fort JEUis, M. T., infor­ mation of the exceeding richness of Clark's Fork in precious metals -was. con­ veyed to me by hunters, guides and' pros pectors. I was The Great Republic Ledge exteiyjs 1,500 feet along the vein of ore and 300 each side from the vein. The vein rons in a north­ westerly direction, and is situated in the Blackmore district, cn the south sida of Soda Butte creek, and distent from, the creek about one mile. The ore is argentiferous galena, with carbonates, and can be easily worked. The vein can be plainly seen run­ ning along the side of the mountain. It has...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

STUPENDOUS SCHEIE. PURCHASE BY H. CLARK& OO.y OF 60,000 ACRES OF LANm The Townsite of Coulson Platted and the Point to Be Made the Metropolis of the Yellow­ stone Valley. A Genuine m. From time io time this TRIBUNE has taken occasion to publish considerable news re garding the Yellowstone Valley, Clark's Fork and the Maginnis country, in Montane, into which the North Pacific railroad is now making its way. For some time the new town of Coulson has been talked of as the coming metropolis of that whole j'country, and now that fact is assured. Mr. Herman Clark, well-known as ode of the mdst ener geticvand extensive contractors on the North Pacific, arrived in Bismarck last evening. He and his New York associates, all large capitalists, have purchase 1 the whole valley of the Yellowstone tributary to the townsite of Coulson, as well as the townsite itself. This huge tract of land comprises 60,000 acres of railroad land, or a strip five miles wide and thirty miles long. The plan is t...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

She giamattk iSrifafflt. JKWKLL. T^KDAILY TBIBUHB.. Wt^tftecityittwenty-five cents par week, or $1 per month. SUBSCBIMON KATSS. 1ne month .postage paid........... ibree months, postage, paid..... |U* One year, .& 1.00 .. 3.00 .. 5.00 .. iaoo THIS WEEKLY TRIBUNE. of the Eight pages, containing a summary news ot the week, both foreign and local, fub lished erery Friday, sent, postage paid, to any address for $2.50, RATES OF ADVEBTISING. ... pllLT. TRANSIENTDisplay, #1.00 per inch first in­ sertion: 50 cents for second, and 28 cents for each subsequent insertion. Ykably:—$5.00 per inch first month $340 per month thereafter. Professional Cards, (three lines or less), $4.00 first month month thereafter $1.00 $15 per per year. MISCELLANIX)U8: Special announcements, either foreign or local, set in solid nonpariel type and measured 12 lines to the inch, will be charged at the rate of 10 cents per line first Insertion, or 40 cents for one week, without change. Write-ups in minion type. 1...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

mmmm The Hews ui Incident* «f tke Week. The river department of the Tannin, bar ring the faoetioas paragraphs which are fre­ quently crowded in daring these dull ioe bound days to season the dry matter of fact paragraphs, is presumed to be reliable, and whenever the reliability of the news in this department is questioned, special efforts are mwria to ascertain the bottom facts in the matter in dispute. Wednesday morning the TBEBBNE stated that the several steamers at the Bismarck levee, excepting the Transfer No. 1, had not been cat oat since the last ofltdsnap. This brought W. J. DeGarmo, the gentleman in charge of the Dacotah, to the front with a letter denying the state­ ment. The communication was not printed because the TBIBUNE had implicit confidence in the source of its information. Yesterday a Teporter visited the boats in question to make a personal instigation, and he found the facts as PREVIOUS stated in the TBIBUNE to have been facta—the simple unembellished truth. The ...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

-#he Bis Flood. "VICKSBUBG, March 24.—The Sunflower river is from*wo to three feet higher than ever before known. People on the banks here for distribution at other points. Newton the people and stock are a plorable condition. A Boom for Inland Navigation. WASHINGTON, March 24.—A meeting was held to-night to consider the question of improvemement of the water ways of the country. The meeting was called to order by Senator Allison, and J. D. Dove of Chi­ cago was selected as permanent chairman. Speeches were made by Senators Allison, Windom, and Logan, Speaker Kiefer, Repre­ sentatives Roberts and Chalmers, and others. The general drift of the speeehes was favorable to the adoption of a comprehen­ sive system of improved water ways for the purpose of affording cheap transportation of the agricultural products of thet country, and resolutions in harmony with these views were adopted. "Curly BUI" Curls Up. Bill" dead i^pon the field. Kducation for the South. WASHINGTON, March 24.—The s...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

I vpa Hhi THE MAGINNIS REGION SOME COMMENTS BY ANEXPERr ENCED GOLD MINE BOOMER. The Locatio the Several 1 tricts in the New Mineral Country in Eastern Mon­ tana Territory. There is no use in trying to develop either an agricultural or a mineral region unless a racket is made about it To demonstrate this assertion, and to show, figuratively speaking, what big oaks from little aoorns grow, the writer would state that he was the first man to begin the agitation of gold in the Black Hills in 1872, as the files of the Sioux City Journal of that year will prove. He con­ tinued the boom until others fell in, and the excitement grew to such proportions that Gen. Hancock deemed'it his duty to warn the organization which had formed at Sioux City. This checked the agitation for a while, but the boom had gained too much volume, and the government yielded instead of the agitators. He materially helped the Barker boom through the columns of the Deadwood Times, and upon his arrival in Bismarck, th...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 31 March 1882

She fHamarcli Sribunt pooHing 'will be resumed in a day or two. Mn. J. G. Pitts has purchased the Glass property Fifth street. Mrs. Lucy Bailey will erect anew residenoe in the eastern part of the city. There is a movement on foot to gpt a large tract oMand south of here surveyed. Capt. W. Raymond will build a brick residence in Bismarck this summer which will be the finest northwest of St. Paul. The wild geese have become tired waiting Com. Maratta's arrival and were yesterday flying 1 west and crooked in this section. John Satterland, of Painted Woods, will put in some timothy and clover peed this year as an experiment. He believes it will do well. The Mouse river explorers are past due, but as the party are old time frontiersmen it is not thought that anything serious has be fallen them. Col. Thompson is east in the interest of the Bismarck, Mouse River, Turtle Mountain & Manitoba railroad. He will also direct emigration this way. J. A. Emmons knows of a three hundred acre wh...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

Spring of 1882. TEE CITT OF BISMARCK. THE METROPOLIS OF THE GREAT NORTHWEST. Its Superior Location and Its Peculiar Advantage Over Other Points for Becoming" a Great Com­ mercial Centre. No one, who will glance at the lii-tory of St. Paul, Kansas City, Omaha and other cities in the great West, can fail to see that Bismarck is sure to become their equal in commercial importance and wealth, and a great distributing point and railroad centre. Situated as it is, on the Missouri river at the crossing of the North Pacific, one of the greatest transcontinetal railroads in the world, reaching from the great lakes to the Pacific ocean, and running through a coun­ try proven to be the best for grain growing and grazing in the world, as the No. 1 Hard wheat of Dakota and the juicy beef of Mon­ tana have already a reputation that cannot be excelled. It is certain that a city must be built at some point midway on such a thor­ oughfare, and how natural and sure it is to be built at the crossing o...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

10ft' $ 9 a & r^Er r^t Ifeorsythesj ButteS $ ck&„ I JCutnose* Butte I O W I A ioe los 104 103 102 jtff —... I J3?! fe -V!%iKV I:'L, Reterring to the Bismarck land district map, beginning on the eastern boundary •with tlie range numbered sixty-seven, the would-be settler is advised that there are only half a dozen claims taken in that range, and they are on the railroad in township 139. James Dunn is the only nan who is doing anything worth men­ tioning in the fanning line, and he, be­ ginning as a sect on man on the railroad,. Mas worked himself up to a very happy competency. He has over a hundred aores under the plow. Tuerc is plenty of good railroad land yet, unsold at $3 and per acre, and those lands held by spec­ ulators can be readily purchased at $4 per acre on time. In range sixty-eight there are six claims taken about Midway by railroad hands, but very little work done on them. In range sixty-nine nothing is taken. In range seventy only one tree claim is taken, at Cr...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

Bismarck into the Mouse riv -r country, and still another northwest into the Sa schatchcwan region. Both of these lines •will be built by the North Pacific. Still another line is projected from Winnipeg to Bismarck, and another from Bismarck to the Black Hills. The latter is also likely to be eonst-ucted under the aus­ pices of the North Pacific. A line is be­ ing built north from Jamestown to Devil's Lake another from Grand Forks to Devil's Lake, and still another west from Breckenridge to Fort Yates. This line will build blanches connecting with the North Pacific at Bismarck, and two or three other points between Fargo and Bismarck. A branch is being built down the Red river lroui Fargo another thirty miles from Casselton. Tne couniry is being literally gridironed by railroads, "because of the magic word, "wheat." RIVER NAVIGATION The Missouri river is navigable for 1,200 miles aoove Bismarck to. Fort Ben­ ton for boats having a capacity of 350 to 750 tons. The Yellowstone, which ...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

iismarck Srilmne. BY LOUNSBERRY & JEWELL. THE DAILY TRIBUNE. Published every morning, except Monday, at 41 Main-st, Bismarck, North Dakota, is delivered by carrier to all parts or the city. at$l per month: six months to any address, postage paid. So: one vear, $10. The only newspaper northwest ot St. "Paul giving full associated press despatches. THE WEEKLY TBIBUXE. Eight pages, containing a summary of the news of the week, both foreign and local, published every Friday, sent, postage paid, to any address one year, §2.50 six months, §1.50. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EDITION. WHERE TO FIND A HOMESTEAD. I11 the Bismarck, Dakota, land district, there is now the best opportunity in the United States for the selection of home­ stead, pre-emption or tree culture claims, under the public land laws. The district is larger than the state ot New York and it contains many million acres of public land absolutely free to any who will come and take. The Missouri river passes on it* wind­ ing course ...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

POINTS FOB LAND HUNTERS STATIONS EAST, WEST, NORTH AND SOUTH OF BISMARCK. Steele, Crystal Springs, Tappen, Daw­ son, Mandaii, Bly's Mine, Curlew, Kurtz, Dickinson, and Other Important Points. Alsop is the last station east on the N. P. R. R. within this land district. The only farm­ er there is James Dunn, a foimer railroad hand, who has 100 acres under the plow, good buildings, and money to draw on. The land about him is all vacant excepting a claim or two. The soil he says is rich, and the coun­ try well adapted to general farming. A Wis­ consin colony is figuring on a location at Alsop. MIDWAY. This is a station nearly on the line between Kidder and Stutsman counties. Two or three trackmen have taken claims there the past season, but no farming has been done. There is a good show for a prosperous settle­ ment about this station. It has not been ex­ amined yet by prospectors. STEELE. This is the name of the county seat of Kidder county, and derives its name from the famous Steele ...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

PBICES AT BIS1ABCK. IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR THE SETTLER'S BENEFIT. Prices of Lots, Lands, Provisions, Farm Machinery, Stock, Fuel, Break­ ing", Etc.—W ages, and Rate of Taxation. Many may suppose that Bismarck, be­ ing located such a distance west, the prices of provisions, clothing, etc., are high, bat such is not the case. The mer­ chants of Bismarck have the advantage of rail and river competition, and their freight is laid down here nearly as cheap as it is Fargo, 200 miles east and much cheaper than at Jamestown, 100 miles east. This being so, they are prepared to eell goods at reasonable figures, and set­ tlers will find upon arriving here, as good and well selected stocks, and nearly as low figures as they have been accustomed to see. The farmer finds ready market for his produce at the various stores and hotels of Bismarck, and receives good prices therefor. WOOD lias to be hauled from the Missouri river, as a rule. Dry woods sells in Bismarck at $5 per cord. Lignite coal,...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

BURLEIGH S BONANZA. A REVIEW OF THE CEREAL CROP OF THE COUNTY. Detailed Statement of the Enormous Yield and What the Farmers Say About the Land in this Vicinity. In this statement we have been com­ pelled to rely largely on the threshers, books. They are correct as to the amount threshed, but they do not give the yield per acre. John Quinlan had six acres of wheat and forty acres of oats. The yield of wheat was 31% bushels per acre oats, 71 bushels. The wheat was extra No. 1. Eighty-seven bushels of it weighed 111 pounds, an increase of over 25 per cent, above the standard. The oats weighed forty pounds to the bushel, an increase of 25 per cent. Thomas Van Elten, on an adjoining farm, 31 bushels of wheat per acre 69% of oats, aud 40 bushels of barley. C. A. Lounsberry had 225 bushels ot wheat from 11 acres, and Lovett Gill's farm, worked by Alex. Cameron, from 90 acres of wheat gave an average of 28 bushels per acre. Norman Falconer had 50 acres of oats, and 25 of wheat, THE AVERAGE...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

Bismarck Sritronc. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EDITION. THIS edirion of the BISMARCK TRIBUNE is published under the auspices of the Bismarck Chamber of Commerce, being in charge oi the «ommittee on immigration. We have endeav­ ored to laitlifully present the resources and ad­ vantages of Bismarck and the surrounding country for the purpose of inviting immigration and capital to our midst. J. K. WETHKRBV, C. K. WILLIAMS, M. H. JEWELL, F. J. CALL, WJI. S. BEXNETT, Committee. SEND to.J. A. Rea, Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce for a copy of this issue, and other information regarding this country. FACTS FOR SETTLERS. THE Bismarck greenhouses afford vegeta­ bles and flowers at all seasons. AN investment in Bismarck is liable to in­ crease from 100 to 1,000 per cent, in the next year. THERE were more miles of railroad built in Dakota in 1880 than in any other state or ter­ ritory in the Union, and in 1881 it stood third on the list. Investments, whether in trade, in banking or in real estate...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

VOL. IX. HIS "JIG IS UP." Alter His Long: Career of Peril, Jesse James is Shot to Death Like a Dog. 1 Murder of the Noted Bandit by the Hand of a Mercenary Coward. •The Slayer a Mere Stripling, Who Doubtless Will Get the $50,000 Eeward. Thrilling: Incident at the Inquest on the Body of the Late Jesse James. Jesse James Killed. Si. Loins, April 3.—Information is just re oeivedhere that Jesse Jaines, the notorious train robber, was killed to-day at or near St Joseph, Mo. Particulars will be forwarded as soon as received. THE BEPOBT OONFIBMKD. ST. LOUIS, April 3.—A brief dispateh from St. Joseph says Charles and Robert Ford, who at one time belonged to the James gang, and were engbged in the Winston and Bine Cnt train robberies, have been in St. Joseph fora week for the purpose of arrest­ ing Jesse James, but being afraid, as is alleged, to make the attempt, shot him down at Thirteenth and Lafayette streets and then surrendered to the authorities, and were lodged in jail. There is trem...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

gjje ^ismorckSributtt A CHlAVp (JBBMIOS. The altitude of the sidewalks inMandan is becoming a question of generel public interest, and is already dividing the citi­ zens of-that place. The Pioneer man who 'wants the walks so as they can be gained only by the use of a ladder or a balloon, Jhas been indulging in some adverse criti­ cism. He so far torgot himself as to bear down on A. W. Hoyt, becaukethat gentle­ men advocated the construction of the walks beneath low water mark. He con­ tinued his attacks upon Mr. Hoyt until •C. Edgar, Haupt, the Mandan. banker, tell it his duly to defend that gentleman in a communication which WHS the Pioneer of the 30th. In-the second paragraph of his letter Mr. Haupt refers to Mandan'a standing nightmno as fol­ lows: The flood of 1881 was unquestionably an extraordinary occurrence caused by an ice gorge, and may, in fact, probably will never happen again. At least the condi­ tions will be permanently affected by the construction of the bridge, the ...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

MORE FATERT WAR SUITS BROUGHT AGAINST APPLE­ BY ETAL. The McCormicks and Their Combina­ tion Claim to Own all Auto­ matic Twine Binder Patents. [Fargo Argus. March 28.] There has been considerable talk for a day or two past among the machinery men and their customers in regard to the recent action of the McCormick folks and N. C. Thompson and Helen A. Gorham, of Rockford, Illinois, who, it seems, have combined together under an old "patent of one Gorham who is said to be the first inventor of the twine binder. THAT APPLEBY'S TWINE BINDER, so-called, which is being used on other machines, which is an infringement on the original Gorham patent, and that this ifTTnois combination has brought suit against all manufacturers using twine binders, to compel them to pay a royally or discontinue the use of the so-called Appleby twine binder or anything simi­ lar thereto in the future, alleging the same to be an infringement on ibe origi­ nal Gorham patent. C. H. McCormick is the well known fi...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Bismarck tribune. — 7 April 1882

BY LOUN8BERRY A JE^IU. THE DAILY TKIBUNlk Published every morning, except'Monday, at Bismarck, Dakota, to delivered by carrier to all jrarts of the city at twenty-five cents per week, or fl per month. SUBSCRIPTION BATES. One month .postage paid.... ...&...$ 1.00 .three months jspstage paid 3.00 KiT O.W One year, 10.00 THK WEEKLY TRIBUNE. Bight pages, containing a summary of the news et the week, both foreign and local, pub­ lished erery Friday, sent, postage paid, to any address for $2.50, BATES OF ADVERTISING, I DAILY. rTitANSIENT:—Display, $1.00 per inch first in­ sertion: 60 cents for second, and 25 cents for each subsequent insertion. YEARLY:—35.00 per inch first month $340 per month thereafter. Professional Cards, (three lines or less), $4.00 first month $1.00 per month thereafter $15 p^er year. MISCELLANEOUS Special announcements, either foreign or local, set in solid nonpariel type and measured 12 lines to the inch, will be charged at the rate of 10 cents per line first I...

Publication Title: Bismarck Tribune
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: North Dakota, United States
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