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Elephind.com contains 2,658 items from Tomahawk, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 23 May 1918

NewsoftheState Condensed for Busy Folks Warren.The Red River Valley Stock Breeders association will meet here on June 13. 1 Red Wing.Mayor Peter A. Nelson reappointed Andrew G. Jackson, chief sof police, and the present staff of po lice officers. Brainerd.The district court grand jury returned an indictment against Di\ Albert Bremken of Pine River, al leging1 sedition. St. Peter.A military funeral was held Sunday for Francis Davis, the first youth from this county. Serv ices were held in the Armory. Pine City.Arthur Moilanen, a Finn, was arrested near Finlayson as a de serter and was taken to St. Paul and will be inducted into the army. Warren.F. E. King has arrived here from France, having been hon orably discharged from the TJ. S. mili tary forces on account of weak eyes. Princeton.Sunday evening Rev. Joseph Willenbrink delivered, the bac calaureate sermon to the graduating class of Princeton high school in the Armory. Sandstone.S. A. Colliver, who has been in charge of the agricu...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 23 May 1918

ll!:i i 1 v.i' Political Announcements. Inserted and paid for by the person named in each announcement at our regular rates. FOR COUNTY TREASURER. To the Voters of Becker County: I hereby announce myself as a can didate for the nomination and elec tion as county treasurer of Becker county. I will appreciate your vote and support at the polls, both in June and November. J. M. CONN ELL. Bichwood, Minn., Aprils, 1918. FO COUNT ATTORNE To the Voters of Becker County: I hereby announce that I am a can didate for re-election to the office of County Attorney for Becker County. Your tfood will and support will be appreciated. Your truly, HKXKY N. EN SON. Dated April 29th, 1918. E. J. BESTICK. FOR COUNTY AUDITOR. I hereby announce myself as a can didate for the office ot County A uditor of Becker County, and respectfully solicit your support during the com ing campaign. E. J. BESTICK. Detroit, Minn., April 18, 1918. A. O. SLETVOLD. FOR COUNTY ATTORNEY. To the Voters of Becker County. I hereb...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

ffyuS ,C A/pJ^'^'1^-ti.: Justice and Fair Dealing for eyery Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. 1 si. 4 CmX Vol. XVI. THE TOMAHAWK. 60S N. BEAULIEU, Founder. Edited by THE TOMAHAWK PUB. CO, White Earth Agency, Minnesota. Entered at the Postofflce at White Earth, Minn., aa mail matter ot the second class. SUBSCRIPTION: S1. il PER TEAR I I ADIAICl In 1907 the White Earth town site was laid out and approved the townsite board consisted of.Charles G. Sturtevant, John Leecy and the then Indian agent, Simon Michelet. Commissioner Beupp, who, by the way, was one of the most in telligent and democratic officials that ever presided in the office of Commissioner of Indian affairs, in 1907, strongly opposed t'.ie con tinuance of the boarding school, so-called, designating it an "edu cational alms-house," the existence of which and its questional, effect on the Indians are alien to the spirit of American life," and that he *'hoped the day was not far distant when such would be re place...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

1 I :Mi 1 'WORK OR FIGHT' IS ORDER GIVEN General Crowder Issues New Regulations Effective July 1, to Coordinate War industries. AFFECTS DRAFTED MEN Those Already Registered Included In New Order Store Clerks, Wait ers, Bartenders, Elevator Operat ors and Others Are Included. i Washington, May 25.Under a drastic amendment to the selective service, regulations every man of draft age must work or fight, Provost Mar shal General E. H. Crowder an nounced. Not only idlers, but all draft regis trants engaged in what are held to be nonessential occupations are to be haled before local draft boards and given the choice of a new job or the urmy. Gamblers, racetrack and bucketshop attendants and fortune tellers head the list. But those who will be reach ed by the new regulation also include clerks in stores, domestics, waiters and'bartenders, theatre ushers and at tendants, passenger elevator operat ors and other attendants. Professional baseball players also may be affected by the order. Defe...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

Poinsettia's Pickpocket By IMES MACDONALD (Copyright, 1918, by the McClure Newspa per Syndicate.) With perhaps a dozen or fifteen oth ers, Duuton sought shelter from the sudden downpour in the entrance of a building on Broadway. The entrance was not large and it was filled to co pacity, but Dunton had not noticed his fellow refugees particularly until he fe* a hand on his arm and a strange low voice addressed him confidentially. I hate publicity! So if you will just be kind enough to return my purse, I shall Ignore the fact that you took it." With a hot feeling of surprised an ger Dunton looked down into a calm pair of gray eyes. Instinctively he slipped both hands Into the pockets of his light overcoat, and to his con sternation the fingers of his .right hand closed over a strange folded purse. "Butbut," he protested, withdraw ing the purse slowly from his pocket, "I didn't take your purse! Really ,1 don't know how It got there!" "Please don't try to explain,"" she said stiffly. Th...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

i?T IIP IP 'WORK HI it i| I 4fo i O a is on General Crowder Issues New Regulations Effective July 1, to Coordinate War Industries. AFFECTS DRAFTED MEN Those Already Registered Included In New Order Store Clerks, Wait ers, Bartenders, Elevator Operat ors and Others Are Included. I Washington, May 25.Under a drastic amendment to the selective service regulations every man of draft age must work or fight, Provost Mar shal General E. H. Crowder an nounced. Not only idlers, but all draft regis trants engaged in what are held to be nonessential occupations are to be haled before local draft boards and given the choice of a new job or the rmy. Gamblers, racetrack and bucketshop attendants and fortune tellers head the list. But those who will be reach ed by the new regulation also Include clerks in stores, domestics, waiters and bartender.s, theatre ushers and at tendants, passenger elevator operat ors and other attendants. Professional baseball players also may be affected by the order. De...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

Poinsettia's Pickpocket By IMBS MACDONALD iVrtttiffl&SQ&l (Copyright, 1918, by the McClure Newspa per Syndicate.) With perhaps a dozen or fifteen oth ers, Duuton sought shelter from the sadden downpour in the entrance of a building on Broadway. The entrance was not large and it was filled to co pacity, but Dunton had not noticed his fellow refugees particularly until he feit a hand on his arm and a strange low voice addressed him" confidentially. **I hate publicity! So if you will just be kind enough to return my purse, I shall ignore the fact that you took it." With a hot feeling of surprised an ger Dunton looked down into a calm pair of gray eyes. Instinctively he slipped both hands into the pockets of his light overcoat, and to his con sternation the fingers of his .right hand closed over a strange folded purse. "Butbut," he protested, withdraw ing the purse slowly from his pocket, "I didn't take your purse! Really ,1 don't know how It got there!" "Please don't try to exp...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

-^i r.i--... r- Si I Right Use of the Flag It Should Never Be Permitted to Touch the Ground, Nor Draped as a Decoration In these days when every household should have a flag, and should fly it upon every occasion offered, its correct use should be known to all. The following, from the National Geographic Magazine, tells the proper usage succinctly "While there is no federal law in force pertaining to the manner of dis- playing, hanging, or saluting the United States flag, or prescribing any cere- monies that should be observed, there are mauy regulations and usages of national force bearing on the subject. "In raising the flag it should never be rolled up and hoisted to the top of the staff before unfurling. Instead, the fly should be free during the act of hoisting, which should be done quickly. It should be taken in slowly and with dignity. It should not be allowed to touch the ground on shore, nor. should it be permitted to trail in the dust. It should not be hung where it can be...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

Stand Stockily Behind Boys "Over There" in Every Word and Action By ABBIE FARWELL BROWN of the Vgate. Wliat are you about, while they are over there lighting for us? Enjoying yourself? Earning your living stodgily"business as usual Making capital as fast as possible out of the safety they are buy- ing with their blood Taking advantage of the crisis which they meet with the offer of their young lives, to demand higher wages, shorter hours, luxu- ries, privileges which they have renounced in order to fight for you That's not patriotism! That's not even fair! That's hoggishness! In these big days, when one has got to live big, I don't know which is "the smallest no-account trashyou selfish woman, thinking only of amuse- ment you selfish capitalist, thinking only of a business chance you selfish laborer, thinking only of the opportunity to squeeze your employer. You are all squeezing your country.. You are all traitors to our boys out there! You are all side-stepping your duty. You are ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

II. S.IN WAR TO THE LIMIT, SAYS WILSON President Opens Red Cross Cam paign With Speech at New York. FOR ARMY OF 5,000,000 UP Cxeeutiv Asserts America Will Con tinue to Send Troops to France Until Germany Is Defeated Asserts Huns' Peace Talk Is Dishonest. New York, May 20.President Wil on in his speech on Saturday open ing the Red Cross drive for a second $100,000,000 war fund, announced that the .purpose of the United States is to set no limits on its ^efforts to win the war. "1 have heard gentlemen recently say," said he, "that we must ge. 5,- 000,000 men ready. Why limit it to 5,000,000? I have asked congress to came no limit, because congress in tends, I am sure, as we ill intend, that evsry ship that can carry men or sup plies shall go laden upon every voy age with every man aud every supply he can carry." The United States, the president de clared, will not be diverted from its purpose of winning the war by insin cere approaches ou the subject of peace. Dwelling on the duty of ...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

Nearlu 1,000,000 Soldiers Who Served in Federal ArmuWereUnder 16 Years of Aoe "And here is another very little chap who gained his medal, Orion P. Howe, born December 29, 1848. He enlisted early in the war and was wounded at Vicksburg and three times at Dallas, Ga. His rec ord is a brilliant one* and General Sherman tells the story in a letter of August 8, 1863: 'Headquarters Fifteenth Army Corps, Camp on Black River, August 8, 1863. 'Hon. E. Stanton, Secretary of War. "'Sir: I take the liberty of asking, through you, that something be done for a lad named Orion P. Howe of Waukegan, DL, who belongs to the Fifty flfth Illinois, but at present is home wounded. I think he is too young for West Point, but would be the very thing for a midshipman. When the as sault at Vicksburg was at its height, on the 19th of May, and I was in front near the road, which formed my line of attack, this young lad came up to me, wounded and bleeding, with a good, healthy boy's cry: "General Sherman, send s...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 30 May 1918

i,'*" fi 13 &' Political Announcements. Inserted and paid for by the person named in each announcement at our regular rates. FOR COUNTT TREASURER. To the Voters of Becker Count3'': I hereby announce myself as a can didate for the nomination and elec tion as county treasurer of Becker county. I will appreciate your vote and support at the polls, both in June and November. J. M. CONN ELL. Richwood, Minn., Aprils, 1918. FOR COUNTT ATTORNEY To the Voters of Becker County: I hereby announce that I am a can didate for re-election to the office of County Attorney for Becker County. Your good will and support will be appreciated. Your truly, HENRY N. JENSON. Dated April 29th, 1918. E. J. BESTICK. FOR COUNTY AUDITOR. I hereby announce myself as a can didate for the office ot County A uditor of Becker County, and respectfully solicit your support during the com ing campaign. E. J. BESTICK. Detroit, Minn., April 18, 1918. A. O. SLETVOLD. FOR COUNTT ATTORNEY. To the Voters of Becker County....

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

1 Vol. XVI. Justice and Fair Dealing for every Indian who desires to become a good Citizen. THE TOMAHAWK. SUS H.JEAULIEU, Founder. Edited by THE TOMAHAWK PUB. CO, White Earth Agency, Minnesota. Entered at the Postofflce at White Earth, Minn., aa mail matter ot the tcond class. SmiMIPTIOI: 11.60 PER TEAR II ADUICl The Government buildings, built with Indian money, have their rodfs painted red. A similar color decks some of the clothes lines in the vicinity of agency employees cottages on occasions during week days, its not red paint however but red woolen blankets bought and paid for with Indian money and bearing the significant initials on their center U. S. I. D. And it is questionable whether these goods were properly condemned or rather confiscated. On or about December 17th, 1917, the village water system stand pipe was frozen and, as a matter of conrse, the pipes were busted. Previous to this time tlie tank, which leaked very badly, was being employed to supply the villago with...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

FORGE OF BLOW NOTJfFJSPENT But British and French are Of fering Stiffer Resistance to German Advance. COMBAT STILL RAGES Teutons Are Moving Their Forces in Fan Shaped Figure, Fighting Hard est on Flanks at Extreme Front of Their Line. London, May 31.The British and Wench'armies are slowly bfct hurely halting the plunge of the German crown prince's forces. While the momentum of the Ger man masses has not yet spent itself there has been a notable slackening In its advance. The chief efforts of the Germans now seem to be devoted to the widening of the gap they have torn in the positions of the Allies be tuieen Pinon and Brimont. This work seems to be, progressing slowly against the desperate resistance ol the Allied forces. The French having fallen back from the limits of the city of Soissons have stood their ground against the attacks Of the enemy, and the German official Statement fails to show'material ad vances there during the day's fight ing. The French are here fighting on fa mi...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

-'I i I i Lfi rgssa^s^sws^wttMSjsssscsc^: The Life Work of Nancy (Copyright, 1918, by the McClure Newspa per Syndicate.) After seven years everything looked Strange to Wilkinson. Spaces were smaller, distancesdeemed shorter. The town had changed but littleand Dan Wilkinson had changed a great deal. Perhaps that is why this home-coming was somewhat of a disappointment. He strolled down Main street," turned -west* on Washington and walked on Mown the hill to the old home where his welcome Was a royal one. But still It all seemed strange and unlike what he had expected. He had come home neither famous nor richneither a failure nor poor, but entirely conscious of the success that was beginning to-be his although quite unconscious of the fact that the breadth of mind and body that had come to him had improved him vastly. His aunt could hardly believe her eyes. He was so manly and yet soso gen tle that she wanted to hug him when -ever he came near. Such a frank, twinkling boy-man, that he...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

Aroducln Baseball "Aces" Magnets When En Route and Help to Keep Turnstile Spinning The ball club that has to worry along without a playing "ace" is aback num ber as a drawing card on the road. The outstanding stars are the "aces" In the big show, for their names are kept before the public, and the fans go out to see them perform. Without them In the lineups of big league clubs HOW CORN IS UTILIZED Tyrus Raymond Cobb, Numerous Product! Are Manufactured From the Raw Material In food production per acre, corn excels all other staple crops. In pounds of protein produced per acre .t is exceeded only by soy beans and beans, says the United States department of agriculture. The great stock feeding and dairy industries of 'he couotry are based largely upon the corn crop, as are also Important manufacturing industries, such as starch, glucose, corn oil, and related products, various food products, and alcoholic beverages. Corn is the great feed crop of the nation. Fed with legumes and grasse...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

Baseball Should Be Encouraged in Times of War, Says John Tener By JOHN K. TENER. Pierident of National League Baseball, in common -with all other outdoor Bports, in my opinion, should be encouraged in times of war as well as in times of peace. Baseball really had its origin during the Civil war, when soldiers in that great conflict benefited themselves physically and in spirit by engaging in this then new game. This was true with the soldiers in our war with Spain, as it is true with our brave boys today who have enlisted under the colors and are either in the camps here or at the front in France. Prom the very inception of the present war England has realized that to keep her soldiers fit they must be given opportunity to indulge in their favorite sports, and by government appropriation that country has used a large sum of money for the purchase of athletic para- phernalia for use of the athletes of her army. President Wilson has given every encouragement to and in fact haa urged t...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

CONGRESS A TAX LAW IS REQUIRED MEW WAR REVENUE LEGISLA- TION IS ASKED BEFORE SES- SION ADJOURNS. DUTY IS STARK AND NAKED 'Wilson Insists Winning of War Dom inates Every Other Consideration Taxation Will Be Great Aid in Crushing Profiteering. Washington, May 28.President Wilson personally took charge of the war tax legislation tangle and appear ing unexpectedly before a joint session of congress, declared it was necessary to proceed immediately with new war tax laws. He spoke as follows: The President's Message. Gentlemen of the congress: It is with unaffected reluctance that I come to ask you to prolong your ses sion long enough to provide more ade quate resources for the treasury for the conduct of the war. I have reason to appreciate as fully as you do how mrduous the session has been. Your labors have been severe and protract ed. You have passed a Ions? series of measures which required the debate Of many doubtful questions of judg ment and many exceedingly difficult questions of...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

News of the State Condensed for Busy Folks St. Hilare.Pennington county farmers attended one of the. biggest picnics of the year here. S Bemidji.Mistaking a can of gaso line for kerosene resulted in sending Anton Laurent/ to the hospital. Crookston.Dr. H. W. Daniels has returned from St. Paul where he en listed in the medical corps. Dr. Dan iels expects to be called July 1 and probably leave for France before August. Middle River.There were some questions about the ownership of a x-$5 bill found on the street- here. In traffic has been closed for all, ve hicles. Street'car service on the East side has been discontinued until the necessary repairs are completed. Belle Plain.Viola Tolzman of this place, seven years old, found two dynamite caps while playing in the woodshed and proceeded to Investi gate,, with the -esult that two of her fingers were shot on*. Her father had placed several of them on the rafters twelve years ago and had forgotten about them, and it is supposed that mice...

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The Tomahawk. — 6 June 1918

I i Jfi I' I i, 5 i S I I I. i i it 4v a Iff .v i i

Publication Title: Tomahawk, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Minnesota, United States
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