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Elephind.com contains 116,947 items from Recorder, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Trees for Future Generations [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Trees for Future Generations Sometimes it is said that in certain European countries the law compels the planting of a tree for every tree cut down, and it is urged that such a law should be enacted in different provinces of Canada. The expression, however, is only metaphorical. What European countries do provide, is that for every acre of forest cut down, in certain areas unsuitable for agriculture, another crop of trees must be started by either natural or artificial methods of regeneration on that area. When forest trees are planted, the trhgs ht«j act, say 2,000 to the acre, aiiJ When tney are xmrveVied,'GO or 70 years later, they stand from 150 to to 200 to the acre. If they had been planted 200 to the acre they would have grown short and full of limbs from the ground up, and would be useless for lumber. Planted thickly they reach upward for the light, making long, clean trunks. The trees which never reach maturity are thinned out either naturally or with the ax, after they hav...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Magnesium In Alloys. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Magnesium In Alloys. Magnesium in massive form, as sticks or rods, is used to deoxidize other metals in foundries and Is a constituent of alloys. More magnesium is now used as a deoxidizer or scavenger in metallurgy than for any other purpose, but its employment in alloys Is increasing and may eventually become the largest one. An alloy of magnesium and aluminum is used in making castings for aircraft engines and parts of airplanes. The skeleton of the British airship R-34, the first dirigible to cx*oss the Atlantic, Is an alloy of aluminum and magnesium, and the yacht Resolute, the defender of the America’s cup in the races in July, 1920, as well as the alternative defender the Vanite, carried gaffs made of this alloy.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Bi i I ions Go to Waste. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Bi i I ions Go to Waste. Three billion dollars waste a year due to smoke! This Is one of the tributes America pays to the economic vice of thriftlessness, at least this prodigious sum is so specified by a leading statistician who states that the benzol, tar, ammonia and gas which yearly float away in the air is conservatively worth $1,000,000,000, while the consequent damage to property, health and comfort is placed at twice that amount.—Boston Transcript,

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Ambulance for Sheei». [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Ambulance for Sheei». A motor ambulance especially designed for the care of sheep, and containing ten pens, five on each side, is an unusual but highly valuable adjunct to an enormous sheep ranch in Alberta, Canada. During the past season some 7,000 lambs were born on the ranch and the busy ambulance was the means of saving the lives of hundreds of them. —Popular Mechanics Magazine.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Tears Brighten the Eyes. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Tears Brighten the Eyes. There is a very widespread belief that the process of crying tends to weaken the eyes and rob them of brightness. Actually, the truth lies in the opposite direction, according to an oculist. The shedding of tears (provided that the weeping Is not overdone) Is one of the greatest aids to softness and brightness of the eyes. The explanation is this: The eyes need a bath just as our bodies do. There is a certain quality in the “tear liquid” which does not exist in water, and that Is why a tear bath is of much greater value than a mere bathing with cold or warm water. There is a possibility that one of the reasons for the superiority of feminine eyes in point of limpidity and brightness over the male optics is the tendency of the gentler sex to Indulge in more or less frequent outbreaks of tears. The moral is that If you want to have what novelists call “eyes like the flshpools of Heshoon,” give the eyes a tear bath at least once a week.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Wants a Free Trip. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Wants a Free Trip. Railroads require that when a body is shipped to any point the undertaker shall purchase two full tickets, but it Is optional whether any one accompany the body. The following unique proposal was sent to a New York undertaker recently : “Within the next five weeks I am due at Santa Fe, N. M., and as I understand there are times when the near relatives of one who has passed Into hazy oblivion cannot come to New York to take charge of same, I hereby hold myself open at any time within the above named period to accompany said oblivious party to any point in the West or Southwest as a matter of covering my transportation in exchange for said services.”

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
NOT ALUfiCIOUS Hunter Revised Opinion of Bad- Tempered Mule. Strange Desire for Offspring Pressed the Springs of That “One Touch of Nature." [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

NOT ALUfiCIOUS Hunter Revised Opinion of BadTempered Mule. Strange Desire for Offspring Pressed the Springs of That “One Touch of Nature." When I was first In Africa I used to ride a mule. In some ways these animals are better suited to the country than ponies—they are tougher and do not contract horse sickness as easily, writes Llewelyn Powers in the New York Evening Post. , The particular mule which I rode was distinguished by having the most vicious temper of any animal I have ever known. It was quite impossible to saddle it unless I put a twitch on Its nose. I had to carry one on the .end of my kiboko all the time, i As soon as ever It saw me approach with the saddle It would give a series of the most horrible squealing screams and begin kicking and kicking like the very devil. Sometimes it would be In so villainous a mood that, besides the twitch, 1 would have to get a boy to hold up one of Its ,front legs. However, it would give ,rae no more trouble when I was once in the sadd...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
New Sports for France, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

New Sports for France, Thrilling, to say the least. If not very sanguinary, is the latest sport taken up by the sporting element of France, when they pit two cocks together, not to see which will kill, but to see which will outcrow the other in given time. A cock according to the figures of the sport, will crow on an average of 60 times per hour, but when trained for competition will go well over the hundred mark In an hour, which is the time, set for the contests. Competing birds are shut up In a low dark coop and fed on millet and chopped beef well saturated with wine and beer. The lowness of the roof of the coop will keep the cock from stretching his neck to crow and when he is released for the contest he will be all ready to make up for lost time. Matches are made for side bets and huge sums of money are wagered on the results of such a contest.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SUNK BANK’S MONEY IN WELL How Gold Belonging to Georgia Financial institution Was Kept Out of Sherman's Hands. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

SUNK BANK’S MONEY IN WELL How Gold Belonging to Georgia Financial institution Was Kept Out of Sherman's Hands. How the money of the State Bank of Georgia was successfully hidden during Sherman’s march to the sea, and how the entire sum, which was between $150,000 and $200,000, was returned to the bank virtually intact, makes a strange story. An old subscriber sends us the tale. On the evening of November 28, 1864, Wallace Gumming, cashier of the Bank at Savannah, was ordered to take the money out of danger, for Sherman was approaching the city. Cumming’s wife, who subsequently wrote the story of the adventure for her grandchildren, accompanied him on a special train that was hurrying to cross the Altamaha river before the southern troops cut the bridge. The gold was packed In nail kegs. At Thomasvllle they hired an empty store and placed the kegs of gold there. Jerry, one of Cururaing’s servants, took turns with a man named Ross in guarding the store at night. Later they transported...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Hard Fate of Brilliant Woman. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Hard Fate of Brilliant Woman. French newspapers are making terrible of the poverty in which many of the greatest French savants are found to live. The first woman doctor to practice medicine in France, Mme. Madeleine Bres, has just been discovered by the newspapers living in extreme poverty and completely blind. She is 82 years old. Mme. Bres was a poor man’s child, and when a child was employed in the hospital conducted by the Sisters of Charity at Nlmes. When she was 15 years old she married a bus conductor, who was jealous of her attainments. After marriage she took lessons in Latin and gained her degree at 28. Later, by special intervention of the Empress Eugenie, she was enabled to attend examinations in medicine and study under the most noted French physicians. After practicing for 50 years, however, her sight failed and for some years she had lived on the verge of starvation, refusing the invitation of the public charity authorities to enter the paupers’ home.—London Herald.<...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Not Needed [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Not Needed A certain Democratic candidate for a state office In the last election tells a story on himself, and he evidently appreciates the humor in it, now. “I w T as billed for a speech at a county seat,” his story goes, “and the Republican county chairman saw my announcement. He immediately wired to his state speakers’ committee: 'Send one of the best speakers you have for Thursday night. So-and-So is to speak here the night before.’ “I went to the tow r n and made my speech. The next day the Republican county chairman wired his speakers’ bureau: ‘Cancel all arrangements for meeting tonight. It is not needed now.’ ” —lndianapolis News.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Giant Gas Tank Being Built. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Giant Gas Tank Being Built. The second largest gas holder in the world Is under construction in Baltimore. When fully inflated the gas tank will stand 22S feet high and will have a capacity of 10,000,000 cubic feet of gas.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
United States’ Nava! Strength. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

United States’ Nava! Strength. Either of the two American fleets, the Atlantic or the Pacific, is far greater than the famous fleet of the United States which sailed around the world in 1907-1908, says the Argonaut. .

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
M m JEALOUS Kabyles’ Version of Tragedy in the Garden of Eden. Serpent Said to Have Used Mirror to Induce Woman to Partake of Forbidden Fruit. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

M m JEALOUS Kabyles’ Version of Tragedy in the Garden of Eden. Serpent Said to Have Used Mirror to Induce Woman to Partake of Forbidden Fruit. The Kabyles of northern Africa are an independent people—as mountain climbers are apt to be. They are not Arabs, and are far superior in honesty and integrity to the Arabs of Algeria. Kabyle women go unveiled and enjoy considerable freedom. The people as a whole are said to be descended from north European races, perhaps remotely the same from which came the ancestors of our own Pilgrim Fathers. They are white, fresh-skinned folk, often blonde. At one time they were Christians. Now, although they are nominally Mohammedans, they still retain many Christian customs, and their legends abound in curious distortions of Bible tales. They have a peculiar version as to how Eve came to eat the apple. The serpent asked Eve if she knew the real reason why the fruit of the apple tree had been forbidden her. She was all curiosity at once. “Because,” expla...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
First Phonograph Disk. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

First Phonograph Disk. The first phonographic disk is still In existence, in the Smithsonian Institution at Washington. It was made in 1887, by Emil Berliner, and the first song sung on a phonographic disk was “The Sweetest Story Ever Told.” The original disk that Berliner experimented with is of glass. A coat of soot was rubbed over the surface. The revolution of the machine caused the needle to scratch the sound into the glass, and thus make lines. Thus the voice of a person singing into the horn wag recorded. From it a zinc disk was then made, and a copper matrix was the next step. From the matrix all records were cast. Thirtyfour years ago all finished records were of rubber. Today the finished record is made of various chemical compositions, with a good proportion of rubber. There were five steps in casting the first disks, whereas today only three steps are necessary. First, there is the wax disk, which records the voice. Then the matrix is cast, and finally the complete recor...

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
To Increase Goats' Milk. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

To Increase Goats' Milk. Milk goat experiments in grading up from native and grade Toggenburg and Saanen does with purbred Swiss bucks, begun in 1911, were continued last year by the United States Department of Agriculture, at the govern ment experimental farm at Beltsville. Md. The flock comprises 20 does and eight kids of one-half, three-fourths, seven-eighths and fifteen-sixteenths blood. The average dally milk yield per doe in 1919 w T as 3.92 pounds, an increase of 2.42 pounds over the yield of the ten selected native does which formed the foundation stock of the herd. The highest milk yield for an Individual doe in one day is 8.6 pounds. For 1919 the flock showed an average of 3.7 per cent butterfat.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Never Waste, [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Never Waste, Caution against wastefulness as practiced by many persons is apt to show itself regardless of time or place. Pedestrians attempting to round one of the busiest downtown street corners in Indianapolis recently found their path blocked by a little shawl-clad woman whose very dress and manner bespoke thrift. She was picking up a pin.

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Crusoe’s Island to Be Park. [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

Crusoe’s Island to Be Park. The island of Juan Fernandez, situated off the coast of Chile and popularly supposed to be Robinson Crusoe’s island, Is to be converted Into a national park and tourist resort by the Chilean government

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
REWARD [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

REWARD I will pay $lO.OO to any one finding and returning the 32 by 4 Goodyear tire on rim taken from my garage Sunday night. I will also pay $50.00 for evidence that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the party or parties that entered my garage and stole the above tire and several keys and light bulbs from cars. Monterey Garage &amp;amp; Light Co. C. M. Lunsford

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
SPRING AGAIN [Newspaper Article] — The Recorder — 29 April 1921

SPRING AGAIN

Publication Title: Recorder, The
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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