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Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

Farm Bureau Vol. 54, No. 9 Tobacco may produce enzyme to treat disease By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor BLACKSBURG—If smoking is ever outlawed, tobacco may still be needed as a means for producing medicines to treat diseases. Tobacco grows foreign proteins so easily that it is being used to produce a human enzyme. If all goes well, tobacco plants could produce an inexpensive form of the world's most expensive drug, Ceredase. Researchers at Crop Tech Development Corporation in Blacksburg are using tobacco for studies on genetic engineering. They have determined that tobacco is the best plant to use for genetic engineering to produce a human enzyme, gl ucocerebrosidase. Crop Tech researchers have engineered tobacco plants to produce this enzyme, which is lacking in people who have Gaucher disease, said Dr. Carole Cramer, a researcher at Crop Tech. "We've converted the tobacco plant into a protein-making machine," Cramer said. "When we tell it, it will put all of its energy into ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

2 PAn/arAeeiAnal ■ « _ _ . .. ... » # . . congressional biqgs isik wiu Tar iers Taoo™TO~Taoe m - ** v - y ■' EH# CDir 111 l I CD ?C-- *"% «o#Vt Iwßi I «*<*'•«*&• » Mafff ftf f> r ■ *ytf \j wOi&Oj _ >, | ' " .^hw Congressional aides took in the aroma of a tobacco warehouse and toured a tree farm devalued by environmental regulations. As the Aug. 21-22 tour wound down, aides said this face-to-fece contact with formers helps aides when they advise members of Congress on farm policies. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation sponsors the Congressional agricultural aides tour bi-annuafly. Aides on the bus tour represented the offices of U.S. Sen. Charles S. Robb, D-Va.; U.S. Sen. John Warner, R-Va.; U.S. Rep. LF. Payne, D-sth; U.S. Rep. Robert C. Scott, D-3rd; and U.S. Rep. James Moran, D-Bth. They rode a bus along a narrow, winding dirt road through the Lunenburg County tree farm of T.R. Wilkinson. The U.SL Department of Agriculture N...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Pesticide use on farms not shortening American lifespans Americans born in 1920 could expect to live to the ripe old age of 54.1 years. By 1940, that figure had grown to an average of 62.9. And U.S. citizens born today have a life expectancy of more than 75. Great strides have been made in the last 50 years because of medical breakthroughs, improved food products and an emphasis on healthier lifestyles. Today, Americans who eat right, exercise and control their stress levels have an excellent chance of enjoying a very long productive existence. Yet, there are still extremists who believe consumers are at risk from our nation's affordable, abundant food supply. Many still blame farmers who spray pesticides on crops. They link the practice to high rates of cancer. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation, which represents 35,000 farmers in the state, says that American food is the safest, most wholesome it has ever been in our history. Scientific studies and numerical data ba...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

4 Buyanew DodipTtek andpickup a ton of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU e MEMBERS. As if our Magnum® engine series, overall the most powerful line of truck engines on the planet, wasn't incentive enough for Farm Bureau members to buy a Dodge, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1996 5.9 L Magnum gas and Cummins diesel Ram regular cab pickups, plus select 1996 mid-size Dakota pickups. The offer includes all 1996 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge offer. * All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. IX W g » A ft ii Hn 1 ''i ' |: *This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 9/30/96, and may not be used in combination with any other Chrysler Corporation certificate program or certain other special program...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Cattle prices may not climb again until 1997 or 1998 By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor An improvement in beef products might be one way to fight the low price cycle that has cattle producers wringing their hands. For two consecutive years, cattle prices have fallen, and they probably won't start rising again until 1997 or 1998 when fullscale herd liquidation begins, said Spencer Neale, assistant director of the Commodity/Marketing Department of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. Traditionally, cattle numbers and prices are cyclical. Record high levels of beef, poultry and pork are in the market Yet per capita beef consumption in the United States has dropped over the past few years as consumers bought more poultry, Neale noted. Feeder cattle prices are running 23 to 27 percent below 1993 prices. A Southwest Virginia producer recently had to sell a trailer load of cattle for $9,800 less than he got last year. Meanwhile, the beef industry is out of touch with the ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

6 Four VFBF board members seeking re-election Nov. 30 WILLIAMSBURG—Four members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Board of Directors will be up for re-elec-tion here at the 70th Annual Convention Nov. 27-30. At press time, all four incumbents were running unopposed. District 3 Director William P. Freeman, District 6 Director John M. Richman, District 9 Director Robert E. Speas and District 12 Director S. Spottswood Taliaferro are seeking re-election. Potential candidates can file until Tuesday, Nov. 28 during the voting delegates' caucus. Nominations will be on the following day. VFBF voting delegates will elect four directors during the general session on Thursday, Nov. 30. The following are brief backgrounds on the current directors: DISTRICT 3 William P. Freeman joined the Farm Bureau in 1979 and was elected to the VFBF board in December 1988. He served as chairman of the county legislative advisory committee for four years, chairman of the county resolutions committee for e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 I Virginia Farm Bureau Federation ▼ 70th Annual Convention T Nov. 27-30 T Williamsburg Marriott ▼ Special Pullout Section Property rights advocate to address convention By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WILLIAMSBURG —A former U.S. Marine captain is fighting the "radicals of the '60s" as they try to take away the rights of property owners. Youll have a chance to hear from this soldier-turned-lawyer at noon on Wednesday, Nov. 29 at the 1995 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Annual Convention at the Williamsburg Marriott William Perry Pendley is president and chief legal officer of Mountain States Legal Foundation, a conservative, non-profit, public interest legal center in Denver. "For 2 1/2 decades, environmental groups have enjoyed unparalleled success in Congress and before federal courts," Pendley said. "Now their leaders are in positions of power and authority at the highest levels in Washington, D.C. Yet there is a growing backlash as Americans respond to the ex...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

C-2 Bp * 4AI Bk.\ M*"* ■ '*• ••*'- •■ 1 ■ ' I ' ?ote flCaaS j^^k BBS : B jfewiWWlWl HVw#*--' 5 '- "- mm a u ifc BH i ■ JBflS^, n m Life-saving gadgets Virginia Farm Bureau Safety Coordinator Bruce Stone chats with a Farm Bureau member at the safety booth at the 1994 Annual Convention. Private industry to steer research in right direction in future (Continued from Page C-1) U.S. Rep. L.F. Payne, D-sth, will speak on "The Final Harvest for Farm Payments?" Hie nation's agriculture polity "will undergo significant change in the coming months and years," Payne said. "The combination of fiscal pressures in government, environmental concerns, and mount- l^ll^ Payne ing competitive pressures from abroad will require the farm sector to develop new and innovative ways of doing business. "The Farm Bureau and its thousands of members in Virginia and throughout the nation will be at the forefront of this change," Payne added. "I look forward Environmental official says excessive regulations hamp...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Williamsburg boasts history, shopping, restaurants By REBECCA COLNAR VFBF Communications Specialist WILLIAMSBURG—This town offers many attractions to convention goers, from an 18th-century village to a variety of shops and restaurants. Best known for its history, the town was the colonial capital ofVirginia until 1780. A visit wouldn't be complete without a tour of Colonial Williamsburg, America's foremost outdoor living history museum. The town's historic area has 500 buildings, 88 of which are original structures. The others have been carefully reconstructed. They include public buildings, trade sites, homes and stores. Some buildings are along the mile-long Peanuts galore You'll find these peanuts among the arts and crafts tables in the cottage industry exhibit hall at the Annual Convention. The peanuts are grown, roasted and packaged by Farm Bureau members Lindsey and Scott Vincent of Prince George County, Va. Their peanuts have sold in all 50 states and overseas. ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

C-4 A massage provides relaxation and removes poisons from the body By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor WILLIAMSBURG—Are your back muscles hurting? Do you have poor circulation? Does your body retain too much fluid? If so, relief is on the way. Massage therapists will be available to give therapeutic massages inside the Williamsburg Marriott during the Annual Convention, said Richard Sells, president of American Spirit Institute. ASI will have massage therapists at the convention. Clients will sit fully clothed in chairs that allow them to lean forward and relax during the massages, which are sponsored by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation and available free of charge to Farm Bureau members. The massage will last 10 to 15 minutes and the therapist will work on the neck, back and shoulders. This helps reduce stress and tension and the chance of getting a headache. A massage provides relaxation throughout the body, and especially in the extremities. It is particularly beneficial f...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Dwarf conifer trees solve big landscaping problems Evergreens form the backbone of many landscapes. But conifer trees, such as spruces and firs, frequently take over a yard as they age. Large shrubs, such as Pfitzer junipers, often crowd walkways and block windows as they mature. A common mistake in home landscaping is selecting trees and shrubs that eventually grow too large for the location. Many homeowners try to keep vigorous plants in bounds by severe restrictive pruning. The end result, however, is usually rather artificial looking specimens, instead of plants that blend with the rest of the landscape. Look to dwarf conifers as a way to include the year-round interest of evergreens, while keeping landscape elements in proportion. These elegant trees and shrubs fit small yards and gardens. They are ideal for foundation plantings or as features in rock gardens and low borders. Some are The amazing walk-behind brush cutter! The DR® FIELD and BRUSH MOWER CLEARS &...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

8 Homemade bean soup makes a healthy holiday gift Treat busy friends and relatives to a delicious homemade gift brimming with oldfashioned goodness this holiday season. Mason jars filled with Hearty Bean Soup Mix are the start of a delicious meal sure to take the chill off any winter evening. Unlike most holiday treats, this nutri- tious gift requires no New Year's resolutions - if s actually good for you. The blend of beans, peas, vegetables and spices is packed with protein and fiber with less than 200 calories and a gram of fat per cup. Beans are one of the most nutritious foods you can eat, yet most people don't take advantage of their goodness on a regular basis due to a lack of cooking time or recipes for preparing them This gift serves double duty because most of the preparation is already done and the recipe card that's included can be used over and over again. The colorful blend of beans are layered in a Mason jar and can be presented in a gift bag with a loaf of hearty bre...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Golden opportunity for wheat growers RICHMOND—Wheat could become the crop of choice for Virginia farmers interested in higher profits in years to come, according to Dr. Dan Brann, Virginia Cooperative Extension small grains specialist. There are a number of farmers that have implemented best management practices in growing wheat, and they are achieving yields of 75 bushels per acre or better, Brann said. Virginia wheat yields in the last decade have increased from the national average of about 35 bushels per acre to a consistent 55 bushels per acre. Some of Virginia's best wheat farmers can do far better, Brann said. At the current forward contracting ARCH STEEL BUILDINGS Buy U.S.A. made. Keep your hard-earned money in America. Low cost. Simple, fast construction (no heavy equipment needed). All steel —maintenance free. * 20 YEAR WARRANTY * PRICES SLASHED *on inventory in stock 25 X 30 40 X 62 50 X 200 30X40 40X 100 60X140 Some other sizes available American ■■■■■■ Ste...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

10 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. > Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadlin...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

November 1995 Former field man goes back to his roots in peanut business By GREG HICKS VFBF Director of Communications SKIPPERS—Lindsey Vincent and his wife Scott started their family business like many aspiring entrepreneurs—in the confines of their household kitchen. But the actual work centered around the stove top—not the kitchen table, as many home businesses do. The Vincents began the Good Earth Peanut Co. in 1989, and actually began by cooking peanuts on a semi-suburban kitchen stove in Prince George County. "We started it in our house with flying pans," Vincent recalled with a laugh during a recent visit to the family operation. Located in beautiful "downtown" Skippers, the business is at a Greensville County crossroads four miles from the North Carolina border. This is near Vincent's boyhood home where he was raised on the peanut farm. While the Good Earth Peanut Co. has become a major player in Virginia's competitive gourmet peanut business, the Vincents' operation—which i...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 November 1995

I V^^SHjflß^Hßflßfl I WmM I || I | I I II if 111 r| | IB I 1 1 tri 111 ■■J '111 ISLHIHH! SLpwLwJfeW^ Vol. 54, No. 9 THE VOICE OF VIRGINIA S AGRICULTURAL PRODUCERS November 1995 % J|giP viflP? .flß^ — —•--• W mf % I i MH 111 1 H H HB^Hn ft ""' ? 1 HH r V 3;" 1 •:, -- ||! - SB BH| gj^K I- i - ~■. -.» $ - t&.,;' lj|| I, *. VQgTt i J®s % ERIC MILLER/FBN Tobacco harvest time Tobacco farmer Billy Coffee (green cap) takes time from his busy schedule to show off his tobacco harvesting machine during a visit from Congressional aides and staff members of the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. See story on Page 2 And You Can Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

Farm Bureau Vol. 54, No. 10 Pesticide records ward off trouble for farmers By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor If someone blames a farmer for groundwater contamination, the farmer could avoid litigation and fines by showing records of his or her pesticide use. Before loaning money for a farm purchase, some banks require a recent history of the land. This must include a record of pesticides used on the farm, especially those on the federal government's restricted-use list. These are benefits of the pesticide recordkeeping requirements of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, said Bonnie Poli, chief of the Pesticide Records Branch of the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service in Manassas. State inspectors are visiting com-puter-selected farms across Virginia to see if farmers are keeping proper records, said Marvin Lawson, program manager of the Office of Pesticide Services in the Virginia Department of Ag- riculture and Consumer Services. The USDA provides some funding for the inspec...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

2 ■ ail nl ■ -£f\ t 9 '" f *f*>«|rlf APIe 1 ;, , % . 4 IfF It S HH - ->M $ktmL*Ji Lu ' Jul *VHMHE Poking fun at people Tennessee actress Judy Duke plays Mattie Gooch, an outspoken Minnie Pear! type, at the evening banquet on Nov. 29 at the convention. She embarrassed men at (tie banquet by kissing them on smi fo?s>head with red Up* sack, y m PPF Ppp I 1 Youth leader wins Farm Bureau Woman of the Year WILLIAMSBURG—She mends fences, helps deliver calves and inspires young people to became veterinarians. Ann Lamb also talks to state lawmakers about the importance of agriculture. These are a few of the many reasons the Warren County woman is the 1995 Virginia Farm Bureau Federation Farm Woman of the Year. She received the honorable designation on Nov. 28 during the VFBF's 70th Annual Convention in Williamsburg. The annual award spotlights a farm woman whose achievements mark the importance of women to their family farms and the agriculture industry. She ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

December 1995/ January 1996 Ag research, government regulations top list of '96 issues A year's worth of Farm Bureau grass roots policy development will soon be unveiled at the 1996 General Assembly. There are a number of issues we'll be fighting for once again in the General Assembly, but there seems to be a recurring theme echoing through the fields, the barns and the county meetings: "Protect us from the government, restore funding for ag research and preserve our land use program." County leaders have also wisely chosen to seek an alternative to replace real estate taxes and are continuing to push for reduced health care costs and lower workers' compensation rates. Here are some of our top issues for 1996: Agricultural research funding Virginia is one of the most diverse agricultural states in America. Its many soils and climates make the Old Dominion a top producer of such commodities as peanuts, tobacco, hay and soybeans. It is also a major poultry, beef and dairy state. But t...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 December 1995

4 ~. OS ED Flood-stricken areas need hay Many bales of hay like this one were destroyed by the June flood in 17 Virginia counties. Madison County Cooperative Extension Agent Brad Jarvis is coordinating a program to donate hay to farmers Hi need. Money is needed to cover the cost of hauling 320 donated bales. The Virginia Farm Bureau Federation has set up a "hay fund" to offset hauling costs. You may write a check to the Virginia Farm Bureau. Write "hay fund" on the check and envelope and send It to P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. VFBF Annual Convention delegates recommended in November that the VFBF set up such funds to help farmers after disasters. For more Information, call Jarvis at 40 948 6881 or VFBF Safetv Coordinator Bruce Stone at 804-784-1681. STARS & STRIPES Forever! Mi erica...The Proud & The Mighty! 3 proud to wear OLD GLORY... |ue Americana collectable... the ty sport cap that powerfully exses to the world your feelings ut flag and country. E...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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