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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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THE HOME CIRCLE [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

THE HOME CIRCLE BY OUR LADY EDITORS.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Be Just Before You're Generous. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Be Just Before You're Generous. NELL VAN I'm glad I'm not a girl," said Willy one morning, " I wouldn't bo a girl for anything; they are such babies ami cry so easy." His sister May had gone to her room to give full vent to her feelings, saying as she went, " I wish boys were not so mean; I'm glad jP*M not a boy. anyway." It was plain there had boon some alterea- j tion in the dining-room, and mamma entering just at this time, resolved to ascertain the facts of the case. It was always bar fashion to enquire into any difficulty that occurred between the children, and thereby gain an opportunity of teaching them a lesson. Calling Willy to her she asked why he had expressed himself in such a manner, and fox what reason his sister had gone from him in tears. Was it because Willy had treated her unkindly ? and was it manly to cause a girl to cry, and compare her to a baby ? The facts of the case were these. Willy had borrowed his sister's slate-pencil, which was a nice long one, and by a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

YOUNG FOLKS' COLUMN.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Talk with the Boys.- No. 2. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Talk with the Boys.- No. 2. [Written f«r tbe Pkkss.] In my last I spoke of studying leaves. Study moans earnest thinking upon some subject, with a resolute purpose to understand all about it. If you merely turn over the leaver of your book, looking carelessly at them part of the time, it is not study. STotl may do your hardest study while you are not looking at your book at all, or even while your eyes aro shut. In the same way, merely looking at the leaves of trees and plants, or even admiring them, may be no proof of study. Study is an earnest effort of mind, holding the thoughts to one subject, till you find out something about it. Did you ever in this way study leaves of trees? What are leaves? Why aro they ? What good do they dof Would not tho tree grow just us well if the leaves were all carefully picked oil' as fast as they were formed? Why not? Some of you may be able to answer these questions. Yon will allow mo to help those who can not. Leaves are the lungs of plants. As y...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
"Pay Your Debts." [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

"Pay Your Debts." Bobby was playing with his toys, when his father came in and sat down by him and said, "Come, Bobby, oomel now pay your debts." The little fellow climbed up on his father's knees, put his arms round his neck, laid his soft chook against his father's rough beard, and began kissing him with all his might. "Is that the wav little Bobby pays his debts "Yes," said his father. "All ho can do is to love his father; and see! ho loves mo just as hard ns ho can." His father clothes him, feeds him, cares for him, watches him by night and by day, works hard that Bobby and his mother may have a pleasant, happy home; and how can Bobby pay father for all his kindness and care? The little boy pays his dobts with love. That is a beautiful way. How good it is in God to give children this kind of monoy to pay their debts with! What wo hold closest wo commonly loso soonest, and that proves least safo which is most dear.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
DOMESTIC ECONOMY. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

DOMESTIC ECONOMY.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Fish as Food. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Fish as Food. Fish meat affords bettor food for students and literary men than for those engaged in active or laborious manual labor. The common whito-moated, slow-moving fish, such as cod, haddock, etc., contain about the same quantity of nitrates as beef or mutton, but more of the phosphates. The more active fish, sixch as trout, shad, etc., contain larger quantities of both nitrates and phosphates than beef or mutton —and this excess is just in proportion to the natural activity of the fish. Nitrates and phosphates furnish food for the musclo and brain and give activity to the body and mind. Hence such food should be chosen for invalids and convalescents. Such fish, however, should be aten with jiotatoes, or some farinaclous food to furnish the requisite carbonates, in which they aro deficient. There is a class of fishos, such as salmon, halibut, mackerel, etc., which are sometimes called oily fishes, which contain a large amount of carbonates, in the form of fat, and which are n...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Vinegar. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Vinegar. What is a Good Article, and How to Use it. Vinegar is sometimes tho only spice, the only condiment of the poor, aad for the sake of humanity, the trade as well as the governmont should do all in their j>ower to procure for us good vinegar, made of wine. There should be no tax or duty on wine vinegar, and no other should be used, especially in a Stato whore the vine flourishes as it does in California. For the rich too, and the epicure it is an important mutter to have good vinegar. Next to good oil, it is tho principal constituent of a good islad. It is also indispensable in preparing sweet preserves, which should be more extensively used than they generally are. The Fruit and Wine Reporter in speaking of this condiment says: Good vinegar must be of alight yellow color, it must show a high degree of acidity without any empyreuinatic flavor. It must have an agreeable odor, easily recognizable as that of acetic ether. The genuine wine vinegar, will not produce the ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
What Shall We Eat? [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

What Shall We Eat? Here are some of the common articles of food, showing tho amount of nutriment contained and the time required for digestion : Time of digestion. Am't of Nut'mt. Applesra.v 1 h 50 m 10 ct. Beans boiled 9 b 30 in 87 pr. ct. Beet roasted 3 h 50 ni 2(i pr. ct. Bread baked a h 30 in 80 pr. ct. Butter 3 Ix3o in yupr. ct. Cabbages boiled 1 h 30 in 7 pr. ct. Cucumbers raw 2 pr. ct. Fish boiled 2hoom 20 pr. ct. Milk fresh 2 b 10m 7 pr. ct. Mutton roasted 8 b 12 in 30 pr. ct. I'ork roasted 3 b 15 m 24 pr. ct. Poultry roasted 8b 45 in 27 pr. ct. Potatoes boiled. 2 h 30 m 12 pr. ct. Kite boiled 1 h 00 ni 87 pr. ct. Sugar 8 h 80 in 'M pr. ct. Turnip*boiled 9bßom 4 pr. ct. Veal roasted 4 h 01) m 25 pr. ct. Venison boiled 1 h 30 ni 25 pr. ct. Potato Flouk.—Few persons in the United States aro aware of the demand for farina, or potato ilour, and of the almost unlimited extent of the market that can be found for this product, which is simply the dry, evaporated pulp of the ordinar...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
How To Eat. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

How To Eat. An English magazine has brought to light a "manual on social etiquette," which was promulgated many years ago. We give an extract or two: "Gentlowomen, tho first thing you are to observe is, to keep your back straight, and do not lean your elbows on the table. Discover not by any ravenous gesture your angry appetite, nor fix your eyes too greedily on the meat before you as if you would devour more that way than your throat can swallow." In another page: "Do not eat spoonmeat so hot that the tears stand in your eyes, or that thereby you betray your intolerable greediness. Do not bite your bread, but cut or break it, and keep not your knife always in your hand, for that is as unseemly as a gentlewoman avlio pretended to have as little a stomach as she had a mouth, and, therefore, would not swallow her peas by spoonfuls, but took them one by one, and cut them in two before she could eat them." Gentlewomen are further instructed: "Fill not your niouth so full, that your chee...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Domestic Receipts. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Domestic Receipts. German Biscuits. —Beat the butter to a cream, and mix in the flour and the cream and the well beaten eggs, to form a nice, light dough; mix all well before kneading it; roll it in thin, long, narrow strips, flavor to taste, and bake on a tin in a quick oven. Ribbon Biscuit. —Mix butter, sugar, eggs, milk and nutmeg together, cut in ribbon shape, bake in a moderate oven. Plain Sugar Biscuit. Dissolve the butter in the milk warm, stir it into the flour to make a firm paste, roll it out thin, and cut it with a tumbler, prick each biscuit and bake in a hot oven. A Luncheon Cake.—One pound of flour, four ounces of butter, six ounces of moist sugar, quarter of a pound of currants, quarter of a pound of stoned raisins, spices and candied peel to the taste; a teaspoonf ul of carbonate of soda, mixed in half a pint of cold milk, all to be mixed together into a paste; then put into an oven without being set to rise. It will take an hour and a half to bake. Wash fob Cleansin...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Mechanical Hints. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Mechanical Hints. To Unite Water-Pipe.—An excellent material for uniting water-pipes is prejmred by combining four parts of good Portland cement and one part of unslacked lime, mixed together in small portions in a stout mortar, adding enough water to permit it to be reduced to a soft paste. Pipes thus united have been in use more than six years without any leak. A Cement to Stop Flaws or Ckacks in Wood of any Kind.—Put any quantity of fine sawdust of the same kind of wood into an earthern pan, and pour boiling water on it; stir it well, and let it remain a week or ten days, occasionally stirring it, then boil it for sometime, and it will bo of consistence of pulp or paste; put it into a coarse cloth, and squeeze all the moisture from it. Keep for use, and when wanted, mix a sufficient quantity of thin glue to make it into a paste; rub it well into the cracks, or holes in your work with it. When quite hard and dry, clean the work off, and, if carefully done, you will scarcely discer...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
LIFE THOUGHTS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

LIFE THOUGHTS. He who has not forgiven an enemy, has never yet tasted one of the most sublime enjoyments of life. Habit is a cable. We weave threads of it every day, and at last we cannot break it. He has hard work who has nothing to do. BEAtJTiFuii is that benevolence which works silently and in the shade. Those who would go to Heaven when they die must begin Heaven while they live. It is folly to expect to break off a habit in a day which may have been gathering strength in you for years. Masters op Victoby.—The nerve that never relaxes, the eye,which never blanches, the thought which never wanders; these are the masters of victory. If we were only half as lenient to the living as we are to the memory of the dead, how much happiness might we render them and how much remorse might be spared, when the grave has closed over them.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Industry. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Industry. Man must have occupation, or be miserable. Toil is the price of sleep and appetite, of health and enjoyment. The very necessity -which overcomes our natural sloth is a blessing. The whole world does not contain h brier or thorn which divine mercy could have spared. We are happier with the sterility,which we can overcome by industry, than we could have been with spontaneous plenty and unbounded profusion. The body and the mind are improved by the toil that fatigues them. The toil is a thousand times rewarded by the pleasure which it bestows. Its enjoyments are peculiar. No wealth can purchase them, no indolence can taste them. They flow from the exertions which they repay. What is a Man? —No man is a man till he is tried; till he has passed through the ordeal—through deep water and scorching fires. A man surrounded by comforts, friends and relations, food and raiment; whose barns are filled with plenty, and whose presses gush out with new wines; who eats his fill, sits and ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
FLORICULTURE. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

FLORICULTURE.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Fuchsia. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Fuchsia. The fuchsia derives its name from the German botanist, " Fuchs." The first plant [Fuchsia triphylla) was introduced into Europe by Plumier, who took it there from America in the seventeenth century. It is usually found growing on lulls throughout the forests of Mexico, Peru and Chili. Along the coast range of California the fuchsia can be cultivated to perfectionj it thrives best in moist and partly shaded localities. In San Francisco and its vicinity, the Fuchsia seems to be at home, and no plant is cultivated here with greater smvess, both out of doors as well as under glass. In summer and in winter it continues to develop its bright little " ear-drops" (as some people call them) and it is remarkable that the same degree of cold which we had here last winter, would have killed those plants if exposed to the open air in New York or Boston, but had not the slightest effect on our plants; in fact, in I many localities they continued to bloom as freely as in May/ Under su...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
[From Blackwood's Magazine for April.] The Descent of Man. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

[From Blackwood's Magazine for April.] The Descent of Man. (Darwin Sptakt.) "Man oomea from ■ Mammal that lived up a tree, Vud a great coat of hair on hll outside had he, Very much like the Dreadnaughts wo frequently seeWblcb uoboily can deny. »He hud points to hll eara, and ■ tail tohia rinni>, To assist him with ease through the branches to jumpIn some cases quite long, uud in some a mere itump Which nobody can deny. ' "This mammal, abstaining from mischevoui pranka, Wai tho't worthy in time to be be.raHed from the ranks, ' And with ■omeunaU ado came to ttand on two shanks— Whioh nobody can deny. "Thusplanted, his courso he soprudently iteered, That hi- hand soon improved and his intellect cleared; Then his forehead enlarged and his tail disappeared— Whioh nobody can deny. "Tisii't to settle when Man became Man; When the afonkey-type itopped and thu Human began; But some very queer thing! wore involved in theplan— Which nobody can deny. "Woman plainly had beard! and big...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

A Thompson Koai> Steamer, from the factory of D. D. "Williamson, Patterson, N. J. (office at New York) , will bo in Stockton about tho 10th inst. Another will bo at Salt Lako City, about tho Bth, having been ordered by tho Youngs. The manufacturers aro receiving very heavy orders for this engino, for use in all parts of tho country. Eakly fcomatoei can most readily bo obtained by tying a few plants to stakes and trimming them to one stalk. When four or five clusters are formed, pinch off the top and side shoots.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
HUMOROUS. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

HUMOROUS. Call on THE Ma< it ink. —A deacon in Illinois objected to the organ purchased by his church, and when called upon to dose the service with prayer, said: "Call on the machine. If it can sing the glory of God, it can pray, too. Call on the machine!" Livid Explanation.—A lecturer undertook to explain to a village audience tho word phenomenon, " May be you don't know know what a phenomenon is. Well, I will tell you; you have seen a cow, no doubt. Well, a cow is not a phenomenon. You have seen an apple tree. Well, an apple tree is not a phenomenon. Hut when you see a cow go up the tree to pick apples, it is a phenomenon." "])o you like fish-balls, Mr. Wiggins. Mr. Wiggins, hesitating: "I really don't know, Miss Robinson; 1 never attended one." A LAD in Hartford, whose fifth birthday occurred last week, asked of his parents if the schools would keep on that day, adding: "They didn't on Washington's birthday.' 1 A BOSTON woman gave loud utterance in a picture gallery t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
CITY MARKET REPORT. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

CITY MARKET REPORT.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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