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Elephind.com contains 937,800 items from Sunday Times, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Subiaco v. West Perth. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

These teams met on the Fremantle Oval     yesterday afternoon, 200 spectators being   present. Both teams were well represented. The play throughout was not of a high order, and although Suciaco played a better game than usual, the final winning comfortably.     The final scores were—   West Perth, 5.10 (40 points). Subiaco. 2.8 (20 points). Wildy, Gross, O'Brien, McNamara, and Cullen played well for the winners, while Bowes, Noonan, and Anning did good work for the losers. The goal-kickers for West Perth were McNamara (2), Hoskins (2), and Gonly. Noonan kicked both goals for Subiaco. Ward acted as umpire.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A BIG AUCTION SALE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

At the Mechanics' Institute next Satur- day night, at 8 o'clock, Messers. B.C. Wood and Co., in conjunction with Messrs. T. Tate and Co., of 113 Williams-street, will offer for public competition the residue of the famous Jubilee Estate at Woodlupine   station and the Woodlupine Park Estate at the rear, on very easy terms, in order to further encourage settlement in this already very progressive little suburb. The soil is good, and will produce almost anything in the way of vegetables and cereals; and excellent building and business sites are yet available from first hands, withall the un- earned increment thereon. A new public   hall and a general store were opened this week, and a railway station is on the estate. Buyers or people with spare cash will do well by turning their attention in this direction. Free train tickets on applica- tion.       Cakes of all kinds made to order at "The Alexandra," Barrack-street. &a...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
SAT UP IN HIS COFFIN. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

SAT UP IN HIS COFFIN. Alexander Scazeletta, an Italian in the county gaol, was being carried out in a coffin in Paterson, Ñew Jersey, after having been pronounced dead, when he sat upright in the coffin. The undertaker's assistants let the coffin drop and fled. Scazeletta had been called in the morning by the keeper but he did not respond. His cell was opened, and the man could not be aroused. The gaol officials sent for a physician. The doctor pronounced the man dead. Scazeletta was arrested at the Erie Depot for acting as though demented. For two days he talked incessantly in gaol, but later be ap- parently lost the power of speech. He has been discharged from gaol on the the recommendation of the county physician.   Go to Kelly and Company where you can get a good boot cheap.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
TRAVELLING UNDER THE SEA. WONDERFUL SUBMARINE GREYHOUND. DESIGNED TO TRAVEL FROM LODDON TO NEW YORK. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

TRAVELLING UNDER THE SEA. WONDERFUL SUBMARINE GREYHOUND. DESIGNED TO TRAVEL FROM LODDON TO NEW YORK. A MODEL of the most remark- able submarine vessel in the world has just been completed by the famous French designer of submarines, M. Goubet. The marvellous craft which he has perfected will cross the Atlantic, and will remain under water half the journey—3,000 miles. The new submarine is an improvement on a somewhat similar model made by M. Goubet as long ago as 1885. That model weighed one ton and a half. Gradually he has improved the type until he has now in his hands a per- fect boat, which will, he declares,   travel between London and New York below the surface of the water, and will be absolutely practicable and   manageable at all points. In a Goubet torpedo-boat tested last year in a lake at St. Ouen, outside Paris, the crew could hear anything going on within a mile. At a depth of 10yds. falling rain sounded clearly to them, and a nail dropping on...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
GATES OF DEATH. Prison Portals Under which the Doomed Pass. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

GATES OF DEATH.   Prison Portals Under which the Doomed Pass. PRISON gates through which the doomed persons have passed always fascinate. The grim portals beyond which hope gives way to black despair appeal ever to the popular imagina- tion. Foremost among prison gates in the whole world stands the Traitors' Gate in the grim old Tower of Lon- don, which has been successively a fortress, a palace, and a prison. This ancient and forbidding looking gate has opened to and The Traitons' Gate Tower of London. closed behind no less notable prisoners than Sir Thomas Moore, Queen Anne Boleyn, Lady Jane Grey,   Cromwell, Earl of Essex, Queen   Katharine Howard, Seymour, Duke   of Somerset, and James Duke of Mon- mouth—many of them to the scaffold and others to the dismal dungeons of the Tower, which the public are not permitted to see. Equally, if not more, grim-looking than the Traitors' Gate, is the entrance to Newgate (says the "Pictorial...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
TO LIBERATE TWO PRISONERS [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

TO LIBERATE TWO PRISONERS Two persons, in this case the per- former and one of the audience, are carefully tied, each having the wrists bound by a cord (A). Then another   cord two yards long is placed over the cords binding the wrists, connecting the two prisoners (B). The task is to liberate the prisoners without opening the knots or removing the cords around the wrists. This is not so very diffi- cult if you know how. The prisoner who wants to liberate himself shoves the cord that connects him with the other prisoner (B), with the help of the ball of the right hand, so high that the ring and little finger of the left hand can grab it, and put it over the ring finger of the right hand. Then the right finger puts it over the left hand, and a short pull will liberate the prisoner. Borrowers are informed elsewhere in our columns that the National Mutual life Association are prepared to lend money on improved rent-producing properties in Perth, Fremantle, and district. Th...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A MARVELLOUS INVENTION. NEW ELECTRIC WAND WITH CARBON POINT. SAID TD EASILY PIERCE THE STOUTEST STEEL [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

A MARVELLOUS INVENTION.     NEW ELECTRIC WAND WITH CARBON POINT. SAID TO EASILY PIERCE THE STOUTEST STEEL HAS the discovery of the marvel- lous carbon point, which melts chilled steel in a second, opened a new   and less dangerous avenue of plunder to the enterprising burgler? Safe- makers say No, and bank directors and   managers, safe deposit people, and   others say they are not afraid. According to more than one authority, the scientific special- ist in bank robbing has merely to select the face of the safe or vault he desires to enter, take a carbon point from his pocket, as he would a pencil or a cigar; and, with a few feet of wire, attach it to the nearest electric light bulb or circuit. For greater convenience he may come to the bank in an automobile, and utilise The Enterprising Burglar with his Electrical Carbon Point. its power to animate his miraculous carbon pencil. The circuit completed, he merely sketche...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
A WINE-GLASS THAT GAN. DANCE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

A WINE-GLASS THAT CAN DANCE. Take two wine-bottles of even size, and close them with corks in wedge- shape. Take two table-knives with heavy handles, and place them on the edges of the corks, as shown in figure, their points touching each other. On the points of the knives place a thin wine-glass, filled with so much water that it balances on the tips of the knives. Then carefully let a small metal ball or piece of money attached to a string down into the water without touching the bottom, and you will see the glass sway down, and then up again as soon as you remove the ball from the water. This experiment is best done with music, as the glass will appear to be dancing to the tune that is played. Mr. Arthur Short, of 509 Hay-street, has several city and country hotels and valuable   house property in the city and suburbs for disposal for cash or on easy terms. In- vestors should inspect his list. We have received a sample of "Doxo" from Mr. F. Ellis, of 237 William-stre...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
DECEPTIVE POSTS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

DECEPTIVE POSTS. Who can help believing that the left-hand post—or most distant one, if we regard the picture as a perspective drawing—is much the longest, and the right-hand, or nearest, post is much the shortest of the three. Yet measurement with rule or compass will sow that all three are of exactly the same length. The eye is deceived by the inclined lines, which represent the top and bottom of the wall, so in the corner diagram the short inclined lines deceive the eye and make the two equal hori- zontal lines appear unequal. The deception in the case of the posts is chiefly an effect of perspective.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
PING-PONG: Suggested Appropriate Costume. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

PING-PONG: Suggested Appropriate Costume. Visitors to Perth will find comfortable   quarters at the Cremorne Hotel W. A. Grenike, propreitor.  

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
AIR PRESSURE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

AIR PRESSURE.   Fill a glass almost full of water, and place your hand over it, the fingers forming a right angle, as shown in the lower figure.   By quickly stretching out the hand without removing the palm from the glass you will create an air-tight space under your hand sufficient to overcome the weight of the glass, so that you can lift it.

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
Our Sunday Serial THE MALLISON MYSTERY. BOOK THE SECOND. AN ENGLISH DRAMA. [COPYRIGHT.] CHAPTER III. THE MEETING THAT THEY HAD. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

OUR SUNDAY SERIAL     THE           MALLISON MYSTERY. BY T. W. HANSHEW.   BOOK THE SECOND.   AN ENGLISH DRAMA. [COPYRIGHT.]   CHAPTER III                     THE MEETING THAT THEY HAD.         It had not changed, that splendid     face, in the four years which had       passed since she last saw it. The   broad high forehead, the slim-walled   nose, the firm square chin, the clear brown eyes, the tumbled brown hair,     the thick mustache, and the ruddy   healthful color in cheeks and lips—all     were as they had been then...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
CHAPTER IV. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

THE STORY OF THE VANISHED YEARS. My lady rose with a sort of throttled   cry, and stood erect before him, her eyes large and round with amazement, her hands hanging limply as though the shock of the thing had quite un- nerved her.   "You my father?" she said presently, her voice ringing untrue, like the ring of a cracked bell. "You my father?     YOU?" He had stooped and gathered up the body of the dead fawn, and now stood with it slung over his shoulder as before. "Yes, even I," he answered. "It is scarcely the sort of pedigree Lady Una Charlock would like to have made pub- lic, I know, but it is true, neverthe- less. I should have known you had we met in the wilds of the desert or the crowds of London; I should have known you even though you had   DENIED your identity, instead of ad- mitting it as you have done, for your face is your mother's face over again, and no power on earth could ever make me forget THAT. &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
"STONE-BROKE." HOW MEN HAVE FALLEN FROM HIGH ESTATE. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

"STONE-BROKE." HOW MEN HAVE FALLEN FROM HIGH ESTATE That poverty is no disgrace is one of the truisms of the day, but for those who have known better times to be reduced to that state is probably the most pathetic thing in life. Such a case was made public the other day by   the statement that Sir Charles Alger- non Coote, an Irish baronet, was, and had been for a long time, obtaining a miserable living by writing begging letters to wealthy folk. And to think that this gentleman is a great-grand- son of the last Earl of Bellamont, who     held the post of Irish Postmaster General between 1789 and 1797 ! Not the Only Man. But he is not the only man bearing a title or connected with the aristo- cracy who is down on his luck. Not   long since the second son of an Earl   was getting his bread and butter by parading London streets as a sandwich man, while Viscount was working, under an assumed name, as a   &...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
STRANGE DIVORCES.'-?-- 1 NORTH OF ENGLAND CUSTOMS. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

STRANGE DIVORCES.     NORTH OF ENGLAND CUSTOMS. Terrible as is an unfortunate mar- riage in any station in life, it is upon the poor that matrimonial unhappiness weighs most heavily. A divorce costs at least £50 or £60, and is absolutely beyond the means of the ill-mated worker, though he can sue in forma pauperis. But as an alternative to a legal dissolution of marriage, popular super- stitution provides a startling and effective mode of severing the matri- monial tie. This is to sell the wife. Thousands of people in the North of England firmly believe that a man by selling his wife dissolves the marriage contract as truly and legally as if a decree nisi was granted and made absolute by Sir Frances Jeune. This vulgar error is of immemorial age, dating from the time when woman   was a chattel, and that it is still firmly held and frequently practised many recent instances prove. Such sales are not, says the "Sun," to be cited with horror and in...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
WOMEN AND THEIR FRECKLES. WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW TO CURE THEM. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

WOMEN AND THEIR FRECKLES. WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW TO CURE THEM. Curiously enough, many women, despite all that bas been written, still appear to believe that a freckle is an external discoloration acquired very much as one might receive a fleck of dust on the surface of the skin. With this belief they naturally imagine that a simple lotion or ointment, if only the right one could be found, would serve to remove the freckles, just as soap and water will take away the dust. Perhaps the simplest way of explaining a freckle is to say that it is a pigmentary stain of the skin. The   pigment of the skin is underneath, and these disheartening spots, although   they are brought to view by exterior causes—strong light and intense heat being the most potent factors—really   are caused by a deposit in the granular cells. Up to the present time no method has been discovered by which   the epidermis may be penetrated so   that the co...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
TUBES OR TUNNELS? HOW PARIS TRAVELS UNDERGROUND. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

TUBES OR TUNNELS? HOW PARIS TRAVELS UNDER- GROUND. Paris also has its "Tube," or, rather, the equivalent of one. It was on July, 1900, that Londoners were nrst able to travel from the city to Shepherd's-   bush, a distance of 5 77 miles, along one of the bowels of the earth. On the 19th of the same mouth electric trains commenced to run on the Chemin de Fer Metropolitan de Paris, or, to speak more strictly, on the main channel of the elaborate system, connecting every part of the French capital with every other, that will ultimately be brought   into existence under that name. This chief artery of Parisian passenger traffic connects the Port de Vincennes with the Porte Mailboat. These two ports are distant 6.6 miles from one   another, so that, as regards length also, there is a close similarity between the French and English Metropolitan Electric Railways. Another feature of resemblance is found in the number of persons car- ried by the trains...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
PRISONER'S STRANGE STORY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

PRISONER'S STRANGE STORY.   A remarkable story was unfolded at Wolverhampton Police Court recently in connection with a charge of high- way robbery with violence against a a youth named David Cooper. Prose- cutor, a grocer named Wilfred Lonsdale, was going home through an ill-lighted street on the night of March 21, when he was set upon from behind, rendered unconscious, and robbed of a metal watch and money, the latter comprising the takings at his shop. Prisoner alleged the existence of a re- markable conspiracy between Lonsdale and himself. He said Lonsdale was in monetary difficulties, owing £80, and they planned together that he should chloroform him in a quiet spot and rob him, and that subsequently he should go to Lonsdale's shop and Set Fire to lt. thus ending all his difficulties. As the chloroform could not be obtained, however, the suggestion that a stick should be used met with approval. Lonsdale was found in a pitiable plight, unconscious and suffering from...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
V.R.C. WINTER MEETING. BAY EAGLE BENEFITS THE BOOKS. OLD SALT SETTLES THE STIFF 'UNS. MELBOURNE, SATURDAY. [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 13 July 1902

V.R.C. WINTER MEETING. BAY EAGLE BENEFITS THE BOOKS. OLD SALT SETTLES THE STIFF 'Uns. MELBOURNE, SATURDAY.   Delightful weather was experienced for the final day of the V.R.C. Grand National meeting, and there was a large company at Flemington. The racing was first-class, although an outsider got home in the Grand National. That race was full of interest. The betting on the course underwent some startling changes. Royal Mail was such a warm tip from Ballarat that he advanced to the head of the quota- tions, while backers after a period finally agreed to pass out Kiota. Royal Mail's stable mate always had plenty of support, and there was a lot of money for Lamond. Error had the entire confidence of the Millers, so stood his ground to all except Royal Mail. There was no appreci- able amount of money for any except these mentioned. The race was a fine one. Lamond made the early running, but Men- suration, jumping beautifully, had the big- gest share of leading. As expected...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS [Newspaper Article] — Sunday Times — 20 July 1902

FOR OVER TWENTY YEARS HERR JBASSMÜSSEN, The Cele- bra*^ " I)aaishl Heríwlíst, has proclaimed from the columns of every newspaper1 itt Australasia that his ALFALINE LOCK PILLS contain ho Mercury, and that they* are a Speedy ami Permanent Cure for tba most serious institutional,-Blood and Skin Draèases, iftleets, Discharges, and all Diseases of: tiber: tlrinary Organs. Also that his ALFALIKE FTTALlTr FILLS never feil to Cure All Nervous Diseases, especially those resulting from early indiscretion and youthful folly. . Thousands of persons have benefited by HSBB EASSMDSSEK'S ADVIOK, which is ' given FEE& -^Thousands have been Cured by takingju»rlemedies. Thousands -have sent>:hiuj "^estímoniak and letters of thanks, /iuiJs, |to-day Thousands of bis CURSO J^ÖLONS are assisting bim to make known to the world the value of his Botannt(iatDiscoverieg and the great virtues of his Herbal Medicines. , . Yet to-day there are doubtless iheasands ¡ of Blood and Nerve Sufferers stall lo...

Publication Title: Sunday Times
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: WA, Australia
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