ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Dunmunkle Standard Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 8,667 items from Dunmunkle Standard, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
8,667 results
CORRESPONDENCE. We do not identify ourselves with the opinions expressed by correspondents in this column, nor will we in any way hold ourselves responsible for same.] OPPORTUNITY OB PREFERENCE. TO THE EDITOR. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

CORRESPONDENCE. We do not identify ourselves with the opinions expressed by correspondents in this column, nor will we in any way hold ourselves responsible for same.] OPPORTUNITY OB PREFERENCE. TO THE EDITOR* Sir,—Liberalism stands for equal op portunities for all classes, even Socialists, of earning their daily bread, and for all people making their own homes. Socialism stands for preference to one class every time, and for taking the homes that others made. But now thai the powerful "Age" has turned another leaf, and, in its leading article of 25/7/14, has condemned the present Liberalism because it fights against Socialism, which this paper in its leader defends, it is evident that the Liberals can't afford to lose one vote if they want to uphold their banner—to be social to all, instead of like the Social ists, to one preferenced class only. We must bear in mind that the party which calls itself socialistic is, in prac tice, the mosf non-socialistic in the world. But facts show...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Pope's Sisters. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

The Pope's Sisters. j I It is now more than a year since the death of tha eldest sister of Pope Pius X., who, with her two young'er sisters and their niece, Gilda , Carolin; lived in a humble apartment in the Piazza Rusticuocij close to the j vast mass of the Vatican Palace. The sisters of the Pope ire char acteristic and interesting figures, . who, notwithstanding the exalted f position of their brother, remain in | the Eternal City as simple and un- ' pretending as in their early days at Riese. Like most women of their class, they never wear hats out of doors, and when they go to church drape a piece of hiack lace over their heads in Venetian fashion. Unable, to read or write at all fluently, like many of their type in Italy, they are extremely shrewd and full of good common sense, and are most notable housewives, j whose only regret is that since I their illustrious brother "has been installed in the Vatican they can no longer seo after his creature com forts as they did through ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

G U L B I N'S MURTOA. For instance—that our Trade is tlie Biggest in all the District!—that our Prices are the Lowest by a long way, and that our Values are not come within Coo-ee of by our Com petitors! Just give us a trial order, and see how well you will be satisfied. IN ALL DEPARTMENTS. CHRIS. GULBIN, Federal Stores, M'Donald Street, Host©®®

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

NOW . GOING ON! Everything must be Sold. * Commonwealth JAL Bank of Husttalia HEAD OFFICE 8YDNEY This Buk b open (or ill duset o( GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS *♦ POST OFFIOE BUILDINGS, Sturt & Lydiard Sts., BALLARAT Also at Melbourne, Sydney, Howcaatlo, Droken Mill, Dubtoo* Canberra, Ada* - laldO) Porth, Hobart, Brlabano, Bockhampton, Townovllle and London, Cable remittances made to, and draita drawn on foreign placet direct. Vorolspn biQl negotiated and. colIecMd. Letter* of credit laued to any part of the world. Bill* nefOtiaUd or forwarded (or collection. Basking and Exchange Burtnms of every description traenwted within tbe Common wealth, United Kingdom and abroad. Co mint acconnta openad. Inv«r**l paid on ftxed depoaita AdrancM mad* againat approvsd securities. SAVINGS BANK DEPARTMENT Branch OfHco: BALLARAT. VlatoHam Oontral Offlool 817 OOLUNS STRUT, MELBOURNE, Branch at In the abore citlea and 2,000 Aeoncloa at Post Office* throughout the Commonwealth D«poalt* from !/• to ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What is Horse-power? [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

What is Horse-power? <1 Among many engineers there arises discussion as to the incidents sur rounding the origination of the term liorso-power as applied to the steam-engine. The following quota tion from "Farey 011 the yteam Engine," published in 1S-7, will be welcomed by many :— "The machinery in the great brew eries and distilleries in London was then moved by the strength of horses, and the proprietors of these establishments, who were first to require Mr. Watt's engines, always inquired what number of horses an intended engine would be equal to. "In consequence, Mr. Watt made some experiments on the strong horses employed by the brewers in London, and found that a horse of that kind, walking at the rate of two and a half miles per hour, could drawl 1501b. avoirdupois by means of a rope passing over a pulley, so as to raise up that weight, with a vertical motion, at the rate of 2U0ft. per minute. This exertion of me chanical power is equal to 3:},000 lb. .(or 528 cubi...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
WITTY CHURCHMEN. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

WITTY CHURCHMEN^ | I A study of the wits of the world reveals the fact that there is a fair proportion of clergyman among th:m, and . a very good illustration of the powers of repartee by an in cident which happened when Bishop Boyd Carpenter woe addressing an j open-air meeting.' ' " An atheist asked the Bishop if he j believed that Jonah was swallowed i by the whale. "When I go to hea-J i ven I will ask Jonah," said his J I lordship. "But supposing," thej other persisted, "ho if. not there." "Then you will havo to ask him," was the quick retort. At ' a farewell dinner to Dean John Gregg, just made Bishop of Cork, a bobtle of rich 'old Water loo port, instead of making a rapid circuit, rested before the guest of the evening. "Come," cried his ("grace of Dublin, from the head of the table, "though you are John • Cork, you mustn't stop the bottle." ■ The Bishop of Cork repliod, " I -sec your grace is disposed to draw me put. But though charged with Cork, I'm not going to ba screw ed....

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Different Walks. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

Different Walks. $ Country people and the dwellers, in cities have ..different walks accord ing . to Dr. Felix Regnault. The city man uses short steps, holds his body erect, keeps his legs straight, and strikes the pavement sharply with his heels before put ting down the rest of his foot. The country man takes a longer stride he leans forward keeping his knees bent, Slides *.is foot ov?r the ground and ..leans his weight upon,- the \v1iq1q sole nt once. Each method of walking has its own merit.' "' ■■■•■ The country man's method enables him to get over greater distances without fatigue if the road is fairly even. If, however, it is rough or broken' he at once and instinctively adopts the mode of the city man. "What have you being doing for the last hour ?" "Oh, just admir ing the . scenery." "What were you looking nt ?" "A iriirrrirv"'

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Things Science Cannot Explain. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

Things Science Cannot Explain. : 1 ■ ITow sunlight turns grapes into sugar. Why the sap of trees is not frozen in winter. Why it is, that many microbes can be boiled and still live. ITow a bat can see to catch mos quitoes on a pitch dark night. ; By what sense a pigeon finds its way homo from a great distance. How the pain of a cut is carried hv the nerves from the finger-tip to the brain. How seeds sown in the autumn re sist the frosts of winter and ger minate as soon as spring comes. How a chicken ten seconds after coming out of its egg knows how to balance itself on its feet, run about, and peck food. How it is that, if the earth is as old as we have every reason to be lieve,the radium in it has not yet 'given oft' all its energy, but seems to be discharging just as much as it ever gave.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
ROPE-FILLED HORSESHOE FOR CITY STREETS. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

ROPE-FILLED HORSESHOE FOR CITY STREETS. . A rope-filled horseshoe, in common use in Germany)-./'may solve, one of tjie greatest 'problems -in', shoeing horses, thnt of providing a shoe that will grip slippery asphalt and )\ <%*-> ; paved street surfaces. ' The ' tread' surface of the shoe is made' with raised edges, and in the groove thus formed tar-soaked rope is securely fastened, so that it projects slight ly below the metal edges. The rope centre makes a cushion for the horse and quickly picks up sand and. small stones, which become per manently imbedded in the surface and supply the /'riction necessarj> to prevent slipping.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
YOUR MORNING BATH. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT IT. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

YOUR MORNING BATH. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT IT. The chief value of bathing lies in its " exhilaration. Don't mak« a penance'r'of it. Tf you don't enjoy it, It's ;;doing jy-ou harm. The good of. .the bath, is in the reaction, the glow that follows it, not ill tha plunge itself. Cold in general, and cold water in particular, is a tonic; First to the nervous systetn, through its branches in the skin, second to the heart and blood vessels as shown in the glow," and third to tha mus cles and digestive glands. It is the best appetiser known, worth all the tonics and bitters in existence. But, like any other tonic, while a small dose stimulates, a large ono depresses. And the size of the dose depends entirely on the bather. For j a strong, vigorous person, in tha prime of life, nothing is better than the cold plunge. It exhilarates, it clears the brain of the cobwebs of the night ; it. sends the blood hum ming through the veins as nothing else in the wide world can. But it takes a vigoro...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

J Labour is God's education.—Emer son. "Pa, what is the race proMent ?"# "Picking winners." 1940. .. :Z* ..

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
An Awful Ornament. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

An Awful Ornament. J It is a curious, study to note j tho variety of feminine ornamenta tion in the different nations, and how what may bo" considered as a beautifier by one race becomes a positive monstrosity and deform ity in the eyes of another. One of tho most ^curious decera I tions in the . wori/f,,..is adopted by tho women of the ' Hi angaiija '• tribe; inhabiting- a country in Africa near one of tho northern tribu taries of the Zambesi. It is called the "pelele." This is a ring, but it is fixed nei ! ther in the car nor the nose, as with other races, but in the upper lip. It is a ring 'made of ivory, metal, or bamboo, according to the wealth of the wearer, is nearly j an inch in thickness, and varies in I diameter at the will of the wearer, ! many being nearly three inches In diameter from outer edge to edge. When tho girls are very young they have the lip pierced with two holes close to the nose, and a j small wooden peg inserted to keep the wound from closing. - When the w...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
"JACK ROBINSON." [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

"JACK ROBINSON." Few people who use the phrase are aware that "Jack Robinson" was a real person. As a politician John Robinson was a great favourite with George III. His political career was a long one, for he was a member for Harwich during twentj-six years, being on one occasion bitterly attacked by Sheridan, who, denouncing bridery and its instigators, replied to the cries of "Name, name," by pointing to Robinson on the Treasury Bench, exclaiming, at the same time : "Yes, I could name him as soon as I could say Jacta Robinson," and thus originated the saying still cur rent.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
Mask of Death. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

Mask of Death. 4 A curious mask of death was de scribed by Captain Nugent before, the Royal Geographical Society, when he gave somo of his exper iences as a member of the Anglo German Commission which marked the boundaries of Nigeria and the Qameroons. Among the numerous " ju-jus" found-in the deserted' lints was a 1 grotesque mask, which was appa rently" kept to frighten'the women. Any women, peeing-it must die at once. The local witch-doctor put on the mask and ran about the hills until he met a likely-looking victim, who was" then killed. Describing one ti'ibe or hill-top pagans, Captain -'Nugent said-: "The villages consist _ of little bee hive-shaped huts of mud or grass, perchcd on .apparently, inaccessible heights or "cun'ningljr hidden ■ away in mazes of dense Tropical vege tation. The inhabitants ... bear a great resemblance''-^^ hionkeys",: 'be ing small in stature, but extraordi narily active. The steepest .and. most difficult ascent over rocks and ravines is to them as e...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BRITAIN DECLARES WAR AGAINST GERMANY. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

BRITAIN DECLARES WAR AGAINST GERMANY. Atone o'clock on Wednes day the Governor-General re ceived notification that Great Britain had declared war against Germany. He in formed the Prime Minister, and Mr. Cooke wired to all the State Premiers. The British Parliament has passed a war vote of a hundred million guineas. The moblisation of the fleet has been completed, and the moblisation of the army is proceeding. Sir Edward Grey says that the efficiency of both was never at a higher mark. Britain is fighting for Belgium neu trality, which has been violated by the Germans. Belgium and Switzerland, both neu tral territories, are mobilising aud pre paring to repel Germany who threatens to advance on France through their countries. Holland is preparing to open the dykes and flood the country if the Germans advance in that direc tion. His Majesty King George has wired to the Governor-General appreciating Commonwealth offers of assistance and stating "I shall be strengthened by con fident be...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE WORLD AT WAR! EUROPE ABLAZE. GREAT POWERS ENGAGED. TERRIBLE SLAUGHTER AHEAD. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

THE WORLD AT WAR! « * EUROPE ABLAZE. GREAT POWERS ENGAGED. TERRIBLE SLAUGHTER AHEAD. The biggest war in the history of the world is now proceeding amongst the great nations, and fearful slaughter must be the inevitable result. Since the Archduke and Archduchess were assasinated at Sarajevo on the 28th ult., very serious European compli cations have occurred. Austria has declared war against Servia, and fighting is proceeding, Bel grade the Servian capital being fiercely bombarded. Russia declared war against Germany, and France followed suit. The Ger man empire is thus engaged with Russia on the east, France on the west, and Servia on the south, her only ally being Austria, as Italy is standing neutral. Great Britain, according to Sir Edward Grey, secretary for Foreign Affairs, is not bound by the Franco Russia alliance to join the beligerants ; but if Germany invades the neutral territory of Belgium (as threatened) or brings out her navy to attack France, England will undertake hos...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
STATE ELECTIONS. Mr. HUTCHINSON SPEAKS OUT [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

STATE ELECTIONS. ' Mr. HUTCHINSON SPEAKS OUT j At the close of a public meeting at Warracknabeal on Firday evening Mr Hutchinson, Minister of Agriculture and Water Supply, took the opportunity of referring to a letter which had ap peared in the press, criticising his actions as a member of Parliament. The letter was signed by Mr. J. Mottram, as secretary pro. tem. for Mr. G. Clyne's election committee. Mr. Hutchinson said that Mr. Mot tram, in writing that letter, had placed himself on the horns of a dilemma. Either he had written in absolute ignorance of the fact, or he stood con victed of what was a wilful and de liberate misstatement of the posi tion. It was said that he (Mr. Hutch inson) had been tried and found want ing, and that during all the years he had represented the constituency the electors had reposed confidence in one who had never used his influence on behalf of the electorate, or if he had attempted to use it, had been ineffec tive ; that there was nothing to show a...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LATEST NEWS. BELGIUM'S PLUCK. FLEETS' MOVEMENTS. BOATS CAPTURED. TROOPS LEAVE BALLARAT. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 7 August 1914

LATEST NEWS. BELGIUM'S PLUCK. FLEETS' MOVEMENTS. BOATS CAPTURED. TROOPS LEAVE BALLARAT. Great Britain's troops are every where responding nobly. The French Mediterranean squadron have captured the German battleship, Goeben. A German fleet of 19 vessels is on east coast of the Baltic. Another German.fleet has joined the Austrians in the Mediterranean. The movements of the British fleet are kept secret. The Germans have gone through Switzerland into France. The Belgians are stubbornly fighting the Germans. Our destroyer, Paramatta, has cap tured the elusive German mail liner, Seydlitz. The 70 th regiment, 1039 stong, I leaves Ballarat to^day.

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
COST OF BAD TEMPER. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 14 August 1914

COST OF BAD TEMPER. » j "By getting into a rage the work of the heart may be increased from 152 to 224 foot-pounds per minute. Keep your temper is, therefore, good advice." This was one of the re marks made bv Mr. J. Strickland Goodall in his lecture on "H<5art Strain and its Prevention," at the Institute of Hygiene recently. lie further remarked that if you go to bed at ten o'clock instead of 12 you will save your heart in the course of a year 876,000 foot pounds of work, while an hour's rest on Sunday afternoon will save the heart G2.400 foot-pounds of work per annum. Wife : "Why, huaband, I tbaoftfit •you had more sense than to buy a cornot. You knew the fellow next door worries us nearly to death with his." Husband : /'Calm yourself,_^my dear. That's the one I bought."

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
What M's.P. Earn. [Newspaper Article] — Dunmunkle Standard — 14 August 1914

What NTs.P. Earn. .Italy nnci Spain are the only European countries which ofTer no monetary reward to their members 1 of Parliament. The Portng-ue.se legislators are not remunerated by I the State, but they have a free pass for travelling on > 11 railways in the country, and their consti tuencies are permitted to pay a sum equivalent to 15s. for each day's sitting. Denmark is another country which believes that its political gentle men are ready to work for al most nothing. Members of Parlia ment there only receive 6s. per day, but they have the peculiar pri vilege of a free seat in the Royal Theatre of Copenhagen. The Norweigan honourable mem ber is thankful for a daily in come of 12s., though he must do his duty properly to get it. He loses a day's pay when he takes a day off. Members of the Swiss Diet work under the same threat. If they are absent they lose salary which amounts in their case to 16s. per day. I?oumania pays her In.w ninkors n sovereign per day, and Bulgaria of ...

Publication Title: Dunmunkle Standard
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
x
Loading...
x
x