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Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Ch... Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 28,405 items from Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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MATTERS EEMININE. HOW TO CLEAN YOUR FACE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

MATTERS EEMtN LNE, HOW TO CLEAN YOUR KAC10. As tho fitco is more exposed to .sun and dust than ruiy other part of tho ImkIv, more euro should be taken in cleansing it. Soften tho skin with eloths wrung out of warm water, then upplv thoroughly a good cold cream, after which a thorouglt rubbing with a camel's-hair brush will leavo few im purities in tho pores. llosowator eight ounces, half an ounce of borax, and two ounces of stained lemon juice make u lotion excellent for removing tan nutl sunburn.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
GERMANS MAKE SUBSTITUTE FOR HORN. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

GERMANS MAKE STJ liSTITOTE FOR HORN. Thore has recontly been introduced in Germany a product mado from hides which combines the properties of leather and celluloid. Tlio hair is iirot removed from tlio liido, and then in or der to remove iloshy matter and fats, and also to harden it, the hide is treated with a mixture of ainyl ace tate and aoetone. The cleun hide is next put into a solution of colluloid in amyl acetate and acetone whereby it is coated with colluloid. Next it goes to vats containing shellac dissolv ed in alcohol, where it receives a coat ing of shellac. The product is very similar to horn, having its elasticity and strength. It is used in the manu facture of trunks, boats, and insulat ing material, and is admirably suited to these purposes, as it is strong and light.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HEALTH IN THE HOME. OUT FINGERS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

HEALTH IN TIlj; OUT l'UNt; II[(6, home, A biokon akin is (jroatly to K„ , ed, for of ton tiuy ,voumIs „ *> f«T. to enter which i;ivo risu J, poisoning. To mako Buro tl , bl<>»l painful illntsss follown n cut °° ^ tl.o Kiifost plan is to pui,, "'1."°"^ tincture of iodino. Thia KjVoa ri^'n^ littlo Biiiartiiiu but it i00u pusso7 ^ ' Tho wound nhould bo kopt mtt.?"' til it is healed with a clean linoa or with a fold of borio g»Uzu

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE CITY BLOUSE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

THE CITY BLOUSE. Frilling- bought by tho dozon will bo found ft good investment for this blouse. It is its chief and only trim plain, it imparts such nn air of fitness for nil occasions that proclaim its superiority, lis claims are best carried out by the choice of materials in its development. Black soft silk or satin for tho girl or woman who finds a. good black sorgo skirt her best investment. Tho blackness of tho blouso may bo turned to sraartnesB by having a I bright coriso or pale blue pip- ! ing ready stitched to a narrow tape, that may bo tacked to tho edge I of neck opening and top of cuff before tho frilling is sown in. Tho color j cho-sen should be tho 6anie tono as* the rose, wing, or feather that is worn in the hat to go with it. A white ; ground silk with a narrow black stripo I •looks well with black laco frilling and ! cherry colored velvet bows. I

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE HOME MANICURIST. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

THE HOME MANICURIST. Most girls like to have pretty, well polished and wcll-cared-for nails, but if ono has to go to a manicurist for this, the expense becomes rather a drng on a limited income, and besides, the ■nails, with a little care and trouble, can bo just as well cared for at home. First of all soak the nails well in warm soap-suds inado from hot water and pure soap; a small pinch of borax add ed to the water will also be found use ful. When tho hands become soft and pliable, dry them carefully with a .soft towel, at- tho same time pressing back tho outside at the base of the nail. Now the nails should be filed to the desired I shnpe. Some people prefer them very j' poiuted, but this is not pretty, and it is in hotter taste to file them to the same shape as the tips of the fingers. Unless the nails have been neglected and allowed to grow very long, it is better not to use scissors; & file will serve tho same purpose. Never on any account use a steel instrument to rem...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
OBEYED INSTRUCTIONS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

OBEYED INSTRUCTIONS. He was a bright young office-boy, and in tho dim future saw himself sit ting in the manager's chair. "Please, sir," ho said, entering the room of his chief, aftor being sent to 1 deliver a note, "the lady ivas out, and I could not deliver your message." "Go back immediately," said his em ployer, impatiently. "If tho lady is still out, put the noto through the let ter-box or under the door. Got it into tho house somehow; don't bring it back here. Now bo oil!" Some little time passed, and then young hopeful returned with a satisfied smile and an air of conscious pride at having overcome all difficulties, and 1 confident of rapid promotion. "Well?" jerked out his employer. "There was no letter-box, sir, and tho note wouldn't go under the door, so I tore it up into little bits and shoved them through the koyliole.'' Our hero was then shoved through tho door—almost in bits— and never came back.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TAKE THE ROCKERS OFF THE CRADLE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

TAKE THE ROCKERS OFF THE j CRADLE. Tho "hand that roclcs tho cradlo" I probably rules tho world, but fit'ioiioo has passed tho judgement that tho , world would bo butter ruled if tho "rockers" wero taken oil' that cradlo. This revolutionary docroo in nuraory laud ia contained iu a leaflet issued by tlio Public Health Department of tho City of London. This documont is addressed to mothors, and among j tho counsels it imparts is tho very ! serious advice—novor rock tho baby! It declares that iu tho interest of both mothor and child the cuotom should bo unreservedly condoinnod. Rocking a baby to sloop is apt to sot up various digostivo disorders and stupciios tho child, and in any case usos hiin or her to bad habits. A healthy child requirps no rocking off to sleep, but shouldafter being fed at tho usual timo, bo put to bod in tho dark and allowed to go. off to sloop quito naturally. Cradlo rocking ia most unwise, and may cau&o a child to grow up unhealthy, cortainly exacting a...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NOT WHAT WAS MEANT. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

NOT WHAT WAS MEANT. A certain doctor, who is, on his own frank admission, "the ugliest mnn in four counties," has ;v keen senso of humor, which enables him to enjoy many real and unconscious reflections upon his facial deficiencies, Once, after he had arrived too lato to .succour a poor woman who had been killed in a factory, tho local news paper published an ambiguous account of tho case, whiclv tho doctor, with* grim appreciation, preserved. Having first described how the woman had come by her injuries, tho para graph wont on to say: "Strong hopes were entertained of saving her life until Dr. P arrived: but those hopes unfortunately proved ill-founded, for tho moment the doctor showed his fare within the door tho poor woman fell back with a gasp and expired."

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
AMERICAN HUMOUR. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

AMERICAN HUMOUR. Unfit.—Sho: "Why do you work so hard t" llo: "I am too nervous to steal." ' Family Prido.—Prisoner (to gaoler) : "Put me in cell 38." j "What for?" "It's the one,father used to have." Stung.—Mrs. Stylus: "The doctor said that I must take plenty of exer cise. He advised me to do a lot of walking." Mr. Stylus : "Sensible advice ( I liope you will follow" it." Mrs. Stylus: "Yes, but I need a new walking dress." * - • • • Bovino Ethics.—Wc see that a pro minent scientific farmer is advocating" that a cow should be treated as a lady. But what is a person to do when he is .going across the field and is charged by her husband? Wc instinctively feel that we would n't treat him as a gentleman. We feel that we would be more apt to try to cow him with a club. "Cow him with a clubl" Oh, oh, oh! Isn't that a bull?—"Judge." * * * « « Exporlonood Advlco. — The young orator had made the effort of his life, and was as chesty over it as a pouter pig-eon. "Well, Colonel," said he, as ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
THE PHYSIOLOGY OF SLEEP [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

[ THE PHY8I0L0CY OF SLEEP A , Although during slooj> tho operations ' of tho souses «re entirely auspendod as roganh* tho oli'ect of ordinary im pressions, the purely animal functions of tho body continuo in action. Tho hoart beats and lunge respire, tho stomach digests, tho skin exhalos vap our and tho kidneys secreto urine. With tho brain, however, tho caso is womo what differont, for whilo soino pirrta re tain the property of receiving impres sions or developing ideas, others have thoir actions diminished, exulted, pur vorted, or altogether arrested. Itelativo ! to tho different faculties of t-lie mind as affected by sloop, groat variations aro obsorvod. It has been supposed that several of thoin aro exalted abovo tho standard attained during wakefulness. Many roinarkable stories aro related, showing the high degree of activity possessed by tho mind during sleep. TIiub it is related of Tartini, a colo brated musician of tho 18th century,* that ono night ho dreamt that ho had m...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
BUTTONS AND MILK. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

BUTTONS AND MILK. At first sight tlicro soems littlo con nection betwoen milk and buttons, but it appears that making pearl but tons out of milk is an industry of a creamory in Now York. All of tho product of this creamery is used for buttons, and tho ownors aro ablo to givo farmers a good' prico for their milk. lii preparing tho button mater ial tho milk is placod in a largo vat and mixed with rennot. It is kept at a tomporaturo of 100 degrees until it is of tho proper consistency. Then u fino wliito powder is added and tho wholo thoroughly cooked for an hour. After this tho whoy is separated from tho curds and tie solid parts aro packed in barrels and shipped to a button fac tory to bo moulded into tho dosired shapo.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
FOLLOWING HIS TRADE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

FOLLOWING HIS TRADE. Speechless with wrath, ft litto man was ushered into the dock. An orna ment of the police force had found him loitering about and had arrested him as a suspicious character. "What wore you doing art tho time of your arrest?" asked the weary magistrate. "Simply waiting I" spluttered tho prisoner. "What wore you waiting for?" "My money." "Who owed you the money?" "Tho man I had boon waiting for." "What did he owe it to you for?" "For waiting." Tho magistrate took his glasses off and glared at tho prisoner. "Do not jost with me," ho said. "Now tell me, have you a trade?" "Of course I lmve!" "Then what is it?" "I earn my living waiting. You soo, I am a waitorl"

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
HOW TO CURE ANAEMIA. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

HOW TO CURE ANAEMIA. When the skin is white and blood less, we may suspect a person to be suffering from anaemia, especially if there are any of the following symp toms present:—indigestion, loss of •appetite, shortness of breath, weak ness, headache, dizziness, swelling of the feet and ankles, ringing in the ears or spots before the eyes. All these are signs that the blood is im poverished, and though the cause may vary in many cases so requiring dif ferent treatment, a good deal may be done to improve matters by attention to diet. The food taken must be nourishing; tender meat not over cooked, milk and eggs should be given in preference to starchy foods or vegetables. The latter should be chiefly of the green kind, these being valuable because they contain iron. Fruit is also useful, not so much on account of its nourishing properties, which are but small, as because it promotes digestion and helps forward the nutritive changes in the body. Next in importance to good food comes fr...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
TO CURE CORNS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

TO CURE CORNS. When corns are very bad it may be necessary to call in the aid of a chir opodist, but much may be done in the way of alleviating this very real trouble by home treatment. iicRln by softening the skin with vaseline or cold cream, rubbing in thoroughly for some considerable time. The next night remove all the hard skin you can, soften the corn by soaking > in warm water, and rub it carefully with pumice-stone, finishing the pro cess by a rubbing with the vaseline as before. Repeat this treatment every night, or at least every second night. The use of pumice-stone is also to be recommended for the hard skin which forms under the tread of the foot and sometimes at the inner side of the sole on the ball of the great toe. This hardened skin is frequently as painful as corns, and when a thicE ridge forms near the toe it throws the foot out of balance when walking, and causes great dis comfort. This is not always under stood, but anyone who takes the trouble to remove the ...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
DRINKING BETWEEN MEALS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

DRINKING BETWEEN MEALS. Nowadays a great many men who are in the habit of taking a moderate amount of alcoholic stimulant daily do so on a comparatively empty stom ach, and no form of drinking could be more injurious. One glass of beer, with no food taken with it, does more harm to the system than three or (our glasses with food. Without the food the organs arc excited to action with nothing to work on, and the const quence 13 the system is made to pay for it. Liquor in any form is more intoxicating on an empty stomach than at any other time, and that is why drinking between meals is more likely to end disastrously. Even the conventional and time-honoured be fore-dinner gin and bitters is injuri ous unless followed immediately by the repast. It arouses the gastric juices, and there must be something soon to satisfy them. Of course, the ' same argument applies to the man who drinks before breakfast. Only it is worse.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
NINE HEALTH HINTS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

NINE HEALTH HINTS To maintain health and waii o! attacks of influenza the following . tal points may be summarise tu impress them upon the attention o) those In danger of infection: (i) ^ generous dietary of nitrogenous fooi Free ventilation of dwelling and sleeping rooms by open windows. (j) Adequate househcating in winter. (1) Boil all milk and cream previous to use. (5) Try to obtain eight hours' sleep every night; if not sound sleep, contract the hours to seven, and rest in the day. (G) If debilitated with weak digestion take rest in the recum bent position a quarter of an hour be fore and after meals. (7) Wear tin loosest clothing possible, especially around the waist and lower ribs; to afford freedom in respiration. |s) open air on foot. (9) If means and station in life admit of a long holi day from time to time live during fine weather in a tent in the open air or in a summer-house for most of the day, and, if unemployed, pursue a hobby to occupy the mind.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
LOVE'S LANGUAGE. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

LOVE'S LANCUACE. Horace was a devout but timid lover. So timid was ho that, though the signs were favorable, he had novor yet sum moned up sufficient spirit to ask his adored one the all-important question. Ono day, however, whilst walking with her in tho garden, a wave of un expected courage swept over him, and ho bogged for a kiss. "You may have just onel" answored the maiden. But remember, a kiss may mean many things. On tho lips it signi fies all or nothing; on the hsmd it shows respect, and on tho forehead friendship. Choose which you likol' Horaco with his oyes on tho ground, thought tho matter over carefully, though nervously. Ho was roused at last from hia meditations by a soft sigh. Raising his eyoa, ho beheld his divi nity with her hat pulled down ovor her forohead, hor hands deep in tho pockets of her jacltot, and hor rosy lips puckcrcd as she sighed. Horaco guessed—and guessed right I

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Phares of Alexandria. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

Tho Pharos of Alexandria. It was in the year 720 B.C. that Ptolemy Philadelphus built the an cient Pharos of Alexandria, which has rightly been described as the father of lighthouses. Since that time the lighthouse build er has been busy in all parts of the world, erecting beacons and towers on dangerous reefs and water-washed rocks to guide the mariner at nightl The coasts of the United Kingdom are now illuminated at night by 269 light houses, and sixty-four light-vessels, those of the United States by 1,479 lighthouses and forty-nine light-ves sels, while Canada maintains some 978 lights, consisting of lighthouses, lightships, and buoys. Indeed, every country possesing a seaboard, main tains beacons so that those who go down to the sea in ships may safely journey over the oceans at night. The ancient Pharos, which stood on a small island at the entrance to the harbour of Alexandria, cost 800 tal ents. If these were silver talents, as most likely they were, that would be equal to £...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
'TWERE BETTER THUS. [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

'TWERE BETTER THUS. In the soft firelight the boarding house sitting-room looked almost cosy and attractive. The warmth and com fort thawed the heart of the oldest lodger. In an expansive moment he turned towards the landlady, who was his only companion in the room, and, clasping her hands fondly, murmured: "Will you be my wife?" The woman did not start nor blush No maidenly coyness shone in her clear cold eyes. "No, sir," she replied, with calm deliberation. "I'm sorry, but I cannot marry you. You've been here four years, and are much too good a board er to be put on the free list." Every thought which genius and piety throw into tho world alters tho world.—Emerson.

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
The Original Americans? [Newspaper Article] — Stawell News and Pleasant Creek Chronicle — 14 March 1914

The Original Americans? On the eastern slope of one of the peaks of the Great Smoky Mountains in Eastern Tennessee, where the first rays of morning sun strike, is an an cient burying-ground; and such an other burying-place could not be found, though the world be searched, for not one grave is more than 3ft. long. The tombs are 2ft. beneath the surface, and are formed of cement and flat stones, and have defied the efforts of time to cause them to be destroyed. Most of those examined contained a vase, a few beads, and a human skele ton, which was never more than 36in. long, and was that of a full-grown person. The natives have a beautiful legend of the place, and say none were interred here excepting Indian children, while naturalists declare that the skulls had reached their full growth. But the most interesting account is that of the red men who held that country when first settled by whites. They claim that when they came to that section of country, it was peopled by a race of smal...

Publication Title: Stawell News And Pleasant Creek Chronicle
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: Vic, Australia
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