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Elephind.com contains 4,460 items from Indian Advocate, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

Tun Indian AuvocA-ir. 5 r J A Sister of Charity. T 1 In the midst of the trouble and turmoil, the worry and want of the world, it is not the least gratifying of man's in heritances that he can look back to those who accepted most of the former as their share, that they might relieve such, as are victims of the Matter. The world contains so much, that is saddening, 50 much that almost Justine'.' the anger with which but partially, observant thinkers feel impelled against its va garies and its vanitys that it has always been a subject of grati fication as well as of edification for such as feel the power of example, and. who believe that a single act of heroism is more seductive in its moral force than any number of flowery dis courses; it is -a pleasure, we say, for such to step aside for a little while from the jarring passions of the.hbur to read and to reflect upon the line of such noble men and women as not only early ages, but even, and he will declare especially, our our own da...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

rrtJSs' 1 f 6 The Indian Advocate. m'T ' & ' 4 f i1" W X .$ .f. Cv w -v . m;lj noble hearts: and as a specimen, but not a rare one, let us say a few words, and only a few; let us1 select in haste which "will, we hope, prove fbrtuitous, among' the acts, the wprds, the trialsand the triumphs of Sister Rosalie,, an humble daughter of Saint Vincent, lessons wherewith to warm our hearts and to strengthen our wills. Without further preface or introduction, let us enter this field in which the aroma of active virtues is so easily distin guished, and let us select a few of those rare favorite flowers of charity offered'us in the life of Miss Jeanne Marie Rendu, known the world over, but especially in France, under the modest title of Sister Rosalie. Born in the village of Com fort, September 8th, 1787, she grew up to girlhood in time to witness but not to understand the terrible tragedies of the great revolution that was then, preparing. Amid the patri archal customs of her mountain hom...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 27 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

-OTrysPT- Tim Indian Advoca'ib. U7 SrJ :. t . can 'find to express our idea; she said that Jeanne would, make . - a. good' woman,, and that no one would have reason to be v ashamed' of, htr. ' , -,v . At the eariy age of. seven she was in the midst of the ter- p , rible days of the revolution. She had. been noticed, even at j this time, for her. interest .in the welfare of. the servants and v her love for the poor. Her home was the refuge for more than one whose head bad a price fixed upon it, and poor Jeanne almost became a traitoress without meaning it. Among the servants, as all were called, there was one, named Pierre, "j, ? to whom there were attentions paid that struck the curiosity of .4' ; the little maiden. Whenever an opportunity presented, itself . ' in the privacy of the family, Pierre was the object of general. veneration, and on one occasion, when, every one thought that the "little thing" was asleep, she saw, through the chinks that 'f u allowed her to peep into an ad...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 28 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

T 1rflt-yE? -vrf- ". - f "V '"S?" ' y ' JP'V v 28 Thf Indian AnvocAir. 1 r . . , . . ( fi she wihrH - ha th nhild fViia Aauahtfr nf Saint Viricent' de i& : ' ? : . . . Paul. It was after the terrible trials of the revolution that she t- . presented herself at the mother-house in Paris, and, by her r . . ... - v r ... J. Ai. J J J a l r - - - J l.- 4.1. ...X mVa kn I ;s uuuuuci auueu 10 me joy experienced uy me sisieis wuu ua.u 7 .f been but a short time reunited. 'Charity but a few days pre-' I viotisly had its stigma removed, and the generosity of a French government atlowed charitable congregations to reopen their doors for the reception of the poor, and the admission of Prot- ' estants to serve them. 3eanne' Rendu' was at length in'her element; now every prayer would be atcompanied by a work of charity. Cr a n ff Vi sf TVToiF t Qrto rVi tithe r Amli-4- A frk frVm n?-ri- tiate. Till the days of St. Vincent de Paul, each suffering had v its resource for consolation, each pain' ...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 29 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

'fy The Indian Advocati: 29 ports, the sacrament of penance, in which a horror of sin and the means to receive its absolution are presented as its fruits; in the most blessed Eucharist is together that love, first of God and next of His little ones, that must be the distinctive characteristics of every true spouse of Christ. Jeanne did not remain long in the mother-house. Nat urally of a delicate complexion, she met with great trials in the beginning; trials that were allowed to give her that nerve, that masculine courage which, afterward so distinguished her. Despite her previously gay and somewhat frolicsome nature, she was extremely sensitive. The sight of blood made her tremble; a spider in her path would make her go any distance to escape it; and it seemed as though she never could bring herself to look at the dead, much less to think of burying them. With such a temperament, added to a weak constitution, in at least one thaf seemed greatly afflicted, she was sent to one of the...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

"f tffiW'!n!jfrTsrr- "rr "f"t,Tr- 30 The Indian Advocate. r community. At that age she was named Sister Servant, a term known among the daughters of St. Vincent as synony mous with mother, superioress directress, etc., in other con gregations. After the restoration of order, the government undertook to meet the wants of the indigent and the suffering, and, to be sure, Sister Ro&alie's district was among the first to demand attention. She was made the channel through which the mis erable of her district were relieved, and by her tact and judg ment, joined to strength of will, which never closed her heart, made the public supplies go far beyond the anticipations of the most sanguine. When named superioress of her community, she had already so far gained the good-will of every one that it was insisted she should accept a full trousseau from the good peo ple of the district. If you will, it does not take much to make up the wardrobe of a sister, yet the offer, not the value of its q...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

"T" WC'WV ( ' T f "iTjf " ? 1 ' 9 A , M? ? f l K v vrn ,s yvTPpFZfY"?! Thk Indian Advocaie. 3i LOCALS JD Rumor has it that our Alumni will be recalled next month. Deo Gratias. The third story of the Monastery is ready for occupancy in fact, it is already, partly occupied. ' Rev. Fr. Leo returned from the East in company with Mr. Thomas Linsky, of Indianapolis, Ind. 'v Several of our Fathers helped the reverend clergy of the Vicariate during the Xmas festivities. Revs. D. Meinrad, Stanislaus, Clement and Placiduswere at Krebs, Hartshorne and Norman respectively. Rev. Fr. Aloysiits held services at St Gregory's and St. Mary's. The ineffable influence of the glorious Catholic celebration of Christ mas still lingers and mellows the light in which we discern even the hard and practical realities that crowd one another's heels in these days of breath less rush and progress. If one were to seek a definition of the wondrous moral force so silently, yet so efficaciously exerted by the Cathol...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 January 1902

32 The Indian Advoca'if. 'grant that these dear children of ours may persevere in their moral and in, tellectual'efforts and thereby oblain' the finaf victory which.ends in eternal glory, f v , hfo ; 7. TERMINAL KnSUl.TSCl SIKTH GRADE 'Floyd W. Harvison, g8. William Scott, 97. James Mulligan, 9G. Patrick Tierney, 95. -CHRISTMAS, igOI. Benedict Hillerman, 98. Spire B. Berry, 97. Fred. Kobler, 94. Frank' Schaefer, 9 THIRD RKADFR. Lewis Brant, 94. Jerome Mellott, 92. Michael McDole, 90. Claude E Dowell, 87. Grover Martell, 86. Horace McEers, 83. HRST READER. Alpysius Zoeller, 93 Sherman Pettifer, 92. Thos". Steinberger, 91. John Castleberry, go, t-OURTII GRADE. r Ilenr) P. Noel, .,9 Walter Freeney, 92. A, H, C CLASS Charlie Hall, 80 Sam Brant, 79. Albert Seek, 75 M4COM) RFVDFR, Clay McEers,p2 Walter Brant, 911 Steve Negahnquet, 90. Philip Deister, 89 OlnerPeltier, 87. OherWeld, 80 I'RIMFR Ray Moore, 91, Leq Petttfer, 90. Claude Castleberr), 89. Jerome Slatter, 87. Isadorq DeGraff, 85 V...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

rrT" "llTW"1 TT T rm, q w y - j "sp TTflF? Tun Indian Apvocate. 47 d I A Contrast in Catholic families. J i -There is undoubtedly a striking contrast between true r Catholic families and those that are not truly Catholic. The very atmospheres of the two kinds are different, and it strikes you almost immediately. "One smacks of the world and worldly things worldly interests and worldly pursuits. The minds of the members of such a family seem to be run ning upon style an,d fashion and society; upon business ana ambitious schemes of advancement; upon the glory of being recognized by the "upper crust" too oten, alas! upon alliance with Protestant families. You look forevidences of Catho licity. There are pictures in plenty, it may be, but distinct ively Catholic pictures are conspicuous by their absence, ex cept Madonnas, perhaps, which are now popular among Prot estants. A glance at their tables and book shelves convinces you that the same may be said of Catholic books. Religion, Churc...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

w - "rvy i-zhpfif" Tf- -w fT" ""WTS?" 48 The Indian Advocate. ? constitutes their life and their chief happiness. The children are obedient, unselfish, united and devoted to each other's happiness. They do not have to go abroad for constant amusement. They scrupulously avoid miscellaneous associa tions, low theatres, cheap dances, and all doubtful places of amusement. They are supplied with interesting Catholic books and papers, and pure general literature. They are not long-faced, strait-laced and over demure in their deportment. On the contrary, they are cheerful, light-hearted and gay on occasions, and ready for innocent games and amusements. It is evident that the great distinguishing feature of the family is that conscience, like a secret, invisible power, pervades and dominates it. Its members live not for themselves exclu sively, but for others. The poor have always a warm place in their hearts, and they are ever ready to contribute liberally, according to their ability, to a...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

-il mn'i mryw vap?r w-" The Indian Advocate. . & 49 THE INDIAN ADVOCATE m. . ii. t T j tj SAORBD HEJART MISSION. OKLAHOMA. A Monthly Review Under jhe Protection of Mary, Queen of the Holy Rosary. St. Michael and St. Benedict. Approved by Rt. Re. Theo. Mecrsclmert, Vicar-Apostolic of Oklahoma and Iiidian Territories. TERMS dV fiUnSORIPTIONl lN S5pglev Copies , 15c. Annual $1.00. Fifteen or more Copies sent to one and same Address, eachf . 75c. 1 'Foreign ... . ,' 4 :, . . .$.25. ' ! T ,, I . , Entered as Sccond-class Matter at Sacred Heart. Oklahoma. , PHIVIIVBOTCHI k 1. Every Subscriber and Benefactor will participate 'n all the merits, prajcrs and pood - t works of the Religious of Sacred Heart Abbey. z A solemn High Mass is sung every First Friday of the month in Honor of the Sacred 1 Heart, for the intentions of Subscribers and Benefactors. ' J t . A Conventual Mass is offered every First Saturday of the month for oyrr departed Friends, Subscribers and Benefactors. l J x 4. E...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

TB 50 The Indian Advocate. c. -lN.alLthe history of. the. Indians'. civilization, there are but .two ihfluences-whose brightness have not diminished. The '4Black,Robe" ,and, the Catholic contract school. -'-z3wwmiftM Vm. n wr- art wV Father Barnum', S." J., has prepared a grammar of the ''Eskimo language, which will shortly be published. The au ,thor had the opportunity of making a careful 'study of' the slanguage during years of missionary labor in Alaska. . 1 There-are 1,000 claims in the Kiowa 'and Comanche country which are affected by the question as to whether , mining claims will interfere with homestead entries. The question has-been referred to the Secretary-of the Interior. " The consistency of the French Government authorities in relation to religious matters is well illustrated by their ac tion in urging the Sultan of Turkey to grant favors to his Catholic subjects, while giving orders, as 'they have recently ,jdone, that, in future-no religious services shall be held on...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

"W(JF "WRHMMMHamNHnmnmv snw'iwwwwjrj 't"ti mmmiihi ii 'iwiiuinipjwr iVj.fTSVyrr -y r rt-" - ' - """ - -n; ij " The, Indian Advocate. 51 spired' by the plea of an Indian-mother who wanted her i two i sons to "work likcwhite men," and has succeeded in anter esting a large number of people, including the Apostolic Delegate, Monsignor Falconio, who has'expressed himsetffwith much -emphasis on the folly of the present system. Miss Hughes is a great favorite among her Indian proteges, -who call her "Kateri Kaidnerenstha'' (she who makes things go pleasantly). Ir you would be happy, tryttq be, cheerful, even y ,misfortunes assail you. You will soon find that there is when you. lou will soon Una that there lsan- ,, other spect to nearly all circumstances in even the ordinary trials of life. When the hour of misfortune comes whether it.appears in the 'form of disease or pecuniary loss face it manfully and. make the best of it. Do not nurse your roubles to keep them warm; and avoid that usele...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

vfTlWrV!BWfirr ' 'jwjtii'i'1WM JfpiMJIir'nwrjrsgpii-- 03 52 The Indian Advocate. If, therefore, the government wishes to assume the role of guardian over the Indian, it should preserve these inalienable rights of the red man intact and untouched. Hence, if In dians require a Christian education for their children as Catholic Indians invariably do they should receive their pro rata amount of the government funds towards the religious education of their offspring. Montalambert's constant recommendation was to do all one undertook with enthusiasm. "Without it," he said, "your life' will be a blank, and success will never attend it." Enthusiasm is one secret of success. It binds us to the criti cism of' the world, which so often damps our very earliest efforts; it makes us alive to one single object that Which we are working at and fills us not with the desire only, but with ' the resolve of doing well whatever is occupying our attention. No accidents are so unlucky but that the prudent...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 21 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

?J-,IJfRPl'(S1"' v KfrT T"- ThIt Indian Advocate. m 53 and until these suits can be finally tried the non-citizens will continue to use them. This is one of ,the intricate problems with which Congress has to deal during the coming session. The United States Government has pledged itself to put the .Indian into possession of his allotment, and the red man is appealing to the department to carry out that portion of the treaty which relates to allotments. It is estimated by the men in the field subdividing quarter sections that to every Chicka saw Indian and intermarried citizen 640 acres of land will be allotte,d - ' Mrs. Elizabeth Allen Denison, "the Barbara Frietchie of Texas,'" died recently. She raised above her home in San Antonio the first Federal flag that floated in the State. The town of Denison, Tex., was named in her honor. The $30,000 building erected for St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Carlisle, Pa., by Miss Drexel, of Philadelphia, who is better known in Catholic circle...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 22 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

'JEW,"PP'n,rn 54 The Indian Advocate. C teflina." J The Song "Salve Refli y TT'mpn i Countless times has our heart been drawn into closer com munion with the Mater Miscricordice upon hearing the inspir ing strains of this beautiful song. And yet, when repeated over and over again, the sweetness of it seems to impress us more and more, ah! even grows upon us. It therefore has found a foremost place among the prayers of the Catholic Church. The composer of this song was one of those pure and devout souls whose every breath seems to be a prayer. Her manus Contractus, for so this noble heart was known, was the son of Wolfrad II., Earl of Veringuen, and was born in the year 1013. His mother, Hildreth, a woman of noble birth, in stilled within his heart from earliest youth maxims of the truth ful and holy, and in return saw her child grow up in the fear of God, whom he loved with the intensity of a seraph. In his sixth year a sickness befell Him, causing a contraction of the muscles of th...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 23 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

r'J5WM!,SBll'VR(T,w "' HF'pv5,"wf '''' ' ' "TFwT-r p-ti - --p-w hm,, j ...- The Indian Advocate. 55 with more piety than ever, during which he offered himself en tirely to the dear Savior, and begged for the intercession of His Blessed Mother, a feeling of awe and reverence filled his soul; and justly so, for there, immediately before him, was a heavenly vision, a beautiful form surrounded by celestial' light, the Blessed Virgin Mary. "My child," spake she, "it is in conformity with the adorable intentions of God, by your affliction, to reveal the power and the goodness of the Lord. Your .submission to His divine will was agreeable to Him; your daily prayers have ascended to Him and He wishes to grant you them. Until now you have no$ possessed health and, knowledge. , Your body, nor your intellect, had no suc cessful' development; therefore as'k for one of these two gifts: health or knowledge. Attest, then, your desire, which of these two blessings you prefer, and your wish shall be...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 24 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

'fTTT ""tv ywirT-rv " vr- - - - -w WTfFlWFTHgJIrS 56 The Indian Advocate. with holy Scripture, history, astronomy, music, literature and fine arts, together with a knowledge of the Latin, Hebrew," j Greek and Arabian tongues. A diary of his is yet preserved, with other works, which is an honor to the perceptive powers and trenchant qualities of his intellect. ' " He composed many hymns and anthems to the Queen of his heart, his Benefactress, the Blessed Virgin. Still, as the grandest monument of his devotion, that delightful salutation: "Salve Regina, Mater misericordiael vita, dulcedo et spes nostra salvel" (Hail Thee, O Queen, Mother of Mercy! Thou, our life, our goodness, and our hope, hail Thee!) was his best effort, and has been waf'od on the resonant chords of time and rings unto posterity. "Ad te clamamus exules filii Hevae!" he further sang; and "Ad te suspiramus gementes et flentes in hac lacrymarum valle! Et Jesum benedictum fructrum ventris tui, nobis post hoc exilium ost...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 25 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

m p$TM$tsmw 7'FWmtf1' ""? i'w - - -rJ , - .,, wt?7PT"w?"VJi The Indian Advocate. 57 ' the closing ejaculation of Hermanus' "Salve Regina." Four brass plates, thirty feet apart, commemorated this incident, but it is presumed they disappeared during the fire of 1689. St. Bernard, who explained the "Salve Regina" in a course of sermons, said that "this hymn was composed by saints, was introduced by saints, and therefore it is only cher v is"hed by the saintly; for, indeed, only the religious and devout soul will value its tenderness and sing it edifyingly. It is so sweet in pointing out the way to grace, so fruitful to incite holy feelings, so penetrating in revealing the mysteries, that it can never be considered nor valued by us according to its real worth. As it has such a charming sound to our ear, our ' innermost feelings are gently touched, impregnating through ' its fullness our soul, and directing us, so to speak, to pour fortnr our hearts to the Queen of Saints, the one who in...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
Page 26 [Newspaper Page] — The Indian advocate. — 1 February 1902

58 The Indian Advocate. cz A Sister of Charity. D Continued from the January Number, On one occasion, when the portress complained that Sis ter Rosalie did not mind the doctor's prescription, she said: "My child, let the doctor follow his trade, and we will do our little work." "But that individual got into a terrible pucker because you did not come down immediately," continued the portress. "Well, do ou expect fine manners from these poor peo ple? Be sure never to fail in notifying me when such persons call for me," and the impertinent solicitor went away a better man, having felt the influence of a true daughter of charity. On another occasion Sister Rosalie had been obliged to refuse a blanket to a poor creature, and at the usual hour that night retired to rest, only to find it impossible to close an eye. At the first opportunity next morning she sent the coveted comfort to the solicitor, "that both might have a good nightSs rest," she said. , When she undertook the care of any s...

Publication Title: Indian Advocate, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Oklahoma, United States
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