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Elephind.com contains 4,571 items from Ranche And Range, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

10 POTATOES AND FIELD ROOTS FOR FAT- TENING LAMBS. This experiment relates to the feeding of lambs bought upon the Montana ranges. The lambs were purchased at Colbert son, Mont, from Win. B. Shaw, the manager of Pros pect ranch. They had been reared on the Open range and were part of a lot brought in from the range in the autumn of 1897. Chief among the objects sought were the following: (1) To ascertain the value of po tatoes, mangels and sugar beets respectively as food factors in fattening lambs; (2) to as certain the outcome from feeding very ordi nal* v range lambs under what may be termed high pressure feeding. There were also sec ondary objects sought, but of a less impor tant nature. The behavior of the lambs on the diet of roots was the feature of the ex periment. Potatoes are largely grown in our state, and in some seasons, as for instance in 1895, the price falls so low that the market ing of the potatoes is of doubtful advantage. These conditions have very naturally bego...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

experiment referred to sold for 50 cents more per hundred. The average value of each lamb in Mon tana was $1.(52. The average selling price was $3.89, hence Hie average advance in value over Hie cost price was $2.27. The conclusion, therefore, is legitimate thai Hie food factors fed in this experiment gave very satisfactory returns, even with lambs that were under rather than over Hie average. The further conclusion is also cor rect that potatoes art; a much more costly food to use in fattening lambs than either mangels or sugar beets. They would seem, however, to be almost equally useful in pro ducing gains. THOMAS SHAW. University of Minnesota. Favorable Conditions for Cotswolds. Prof. J. A. Craig in a recent issue of the Breeders- Gazette writes as follows regard ing the advantages of Oregon as a sheep raising section. The Professor's remarks ap ply equally as well to Washington and Brit ish Columbia: The following inquiry from J. I. A., West Branch, la., has reached me in refere...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

12 A POULTRY EXPERIENCE. Eighteen years ago I experienced the sen sation of having my neighbors all give me the laugh for trading a yearling steer for six Brown Leghorn pullets. They made so much fun of me that when 1 bought a rooster to place with the pullets, I took him from the express office and covered him up in the buggy so no one could see him. So much was said of "Buff Jersey's" trade that I deter mined to keep track of the year's outcome from my start in pure-bred poultry. We hatched and raised from this pen 320 chick ens; sold at produce prices $3G worth of chickens, also 18 roosters for $12, and a breeding pen for $18, besides we used a large number of chickens and eggs in the family. We kept a pen of 18 pullets and a rooster that were successfully kept for some years after. That year we exhibited our chickens at our county fair and carried away every premium offered for that breed. Since that time I have bred the Brown Leghorn in pref erence to any other breed. I have fo...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

HARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. Apples—Fancy, 75c@$l*. very fancy, $1® _.">; apples, cooking, 35@65c. 'potatoes are ?9<g)ll. Quinces— a box. Pears are 25c@l. Celery, 400 per doz; lettuce, 10c; hot house lettuce, 40c; new onions, 75c for silverskins; new cabbage, %c per lb for native; parsnips, 75c per sack; cauli flower, 35@75c per doz; new turnips, 50c per sack; river sweet potatoes, l*4c; Mer ced sweets, l%c; huckleberries, s@6c. Carrots, 50c per sack; crab apples, 40c; beets, 65_>75c per sack; cranberries, $9@9.50 per bbl; pumpkins, %c. PAYING PRICES. Butter— Ranch, 15@20c; creamery, 22® 26c. Eggs are firm and scarce. Eggs—Fresh ranch, 28@29e. Cheese market is firm at ll@l2c. Live stock—Choice beef cattle,, cows, 2% @3c; steers, 3%@3*c; choice sheep, 3*c; good hogs, live, 4*@sc; hogs, dressed, 6c; calves, live, large, 6c; small, 7*c. Poultry—Chickens, live, 12c; live tur keys, 12@13c; ducks, 12c per lb. Wool has a decided downward tendency; is quite weak. Wool—We quote Western W...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

14 OREGON BEET SUGAR. The inauguration of the beet-sugar industry, just now accomplished at La Grande, ranks with the very large incidents of our state developments. It belongs to the class of events wh.'ch includes the organization of systematic and regular interior nav igation about 1859, the dispatch of the first cargo of wheat to Europe in 18(18, the beginning of the commercial salmon industry in 1864, the creation of railway transportation in the Willamette valley in 1870, the establishment of direct communication with the East in 1883, and the destruction of the Columbia river bar by the Point Stevens jetty in 1895. Each of these events, large in itself, grows larger as time goes on in its relations to the progress of the country; and so there is every reason to hope it will be with the beet-sugar industry. 'Important as it is regarded merely as an industry wholly new, and as one of large profits, it is more important still in its promise as an organizing force in the future a...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

Pacific ■ Jacob liettrick, 9 . JLi J Local and district agents L__\f\f_ **fl|T _______Y^i wanted on all parts of the _Bi^__f Pacific Coast. yelm, vv n . A _M__^*^__D_ Is a Cream Separator a paying Invest f%^ {\*A)r^'m\^ /"VyLT _Pt____!___L ment? If you keen cows, what is your ob /■**% v/ fT I I 1 - V 1 _P¥_n_b ject In so doinß? What system do you **■ ™*^^fc l^^^^^^/ %# i-sfiP__ use t0 cream your milk? What per cent. **— * m^ wR% of the fat ln the milk are you able to gel _ a, . m H__m with the present system? What Is tht M ~ 1 • _,^__ __ __ cost In time, labor and ware? Do not wait 1 .A /l 1 m "B^ _^ ** ■(ril_k!-Hr Wltiifc. until you see how your neighbor Is going I -ft. -11l BJ^C Hy to make a. separator pay; figure It out _____*f^*/I.M. J__-^^mr _____P_S_____«_- yourself. Buy an "Eclipse Separator" at it _-^*«B__lrSl___R_s***!^ once and get your share of Increased prof *%A!—-^t\p^^2 -.. '_&>* Its pained by the use of a separator. All *•/. era _-_-_ C__,_%__ _•___*/_#•__ ~ ' ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 10 November 1898

16 ®®®@®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®® 1 MITCHELL WAGONS 1 S ® | Are the Best Wagons Possible to Build 1 m ® | ALWAYS HAVE BEEN, ALWAYS WILL BE I m ® ® A reputation maintained for 65 years is a better guarantee of a good wagon made of best materials, properly seasoned, ® )j|r than all the promises and assertions of manufacturers' agents and dealers in new-named unknown wagons combined. Manu- 5K £& facturers of Mitchell Wagons pay 25 to 35 per cent, above the market price of the best wagon timber for the privilege of @& ® culling over, selling and skimming off the cream of the best wagon stock. This is ABSOLUTE FACT and the Mitchell ® fl WAGON POSITIVELY IS A SUPERIOR ARTICLE. ® 1 Buy a Mitchell Wagon | $& And KNOW that you have the BEST that can be made. £ft | riitchell, Lewis & Stayer Co. 1 f GENERAL AGENTS f 1 First and Taylor Streets = = PORTLAND, Or. | b®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®® __^ ((^M\ © „-"* _—*_ —■*■,_"->_ _**-♦ ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

SANCHANDiANGE MY^ 4©" ISSUED EVERY WEEK H§r Vol. 4, No. 35 fi*r ft? Pr f|«r fi«r f,e f|e f[e Ur Hr t?i«r fi«r •$? f|e fi«r f,e fi«r f,e PJT «i* fie fie f|«r fie fiel^ H Harm Dairy Implements J JjSU. CURTIS "LEVER" BUTTER WORKER. JJ£. JIT CURTIS "FAVORITE" BUTTER WOTKER. *___S___. *^ ~*m^j * RARPPI CHURN <••*^_*> "^*" CURTIS RECTANGULAR CHURN. CURTIS BAR CHURN WITH DOG POWER. .__■■_* v *__fl____E&Vi_______s V __c -i _____?_!____ flfr -*?** For full particulars regarding the above illustrated goods, and hundreds of other implements of a like .«gi^H_BSH^_________. * J3^_. nature. Write for copy of our general catalogue of Creamery and Dairy Machinery. We are General Agents M M J[£. f" for the DE LAVAL "ALPHA" CREAM SEPARATOR. Write for special Hand Separator Catalogue. ' I iSffiM r^ * Columbia Implement Company |*| *; 2*4 Agricultural Implements; Creamery and Dairy machinery & Supplies I^^JP^^ J_r^ *W NEW MARKET BLOCK, 13 TO 27 FIRST STREET, if 'C P. O. Drawer No. 26. POR...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

2 jAMIk w a ■■■ "w m r^-l^i T^ "% T __\___l_fe_ # It Will Pay You # J^^^. TO DO YOUR TRADING /^^^®\ 4 lt Will Pay You ii^FM§^i^i% TO DO YOUR TRADING __t^^Mlii^^ --■■■■ WITH ITQ _di__^^Wii%^!i_ • * wll n ur> You Take No Chances in Buying J||§| ' ' 1 ?__-i—_ jm . ¥ T <(__L One of the prettiest capes shown ************ prO-TI \_J *^_> ===•=•=•= One of the seasons most popular this season. styles in jackets. We guarantee the quality, and if for any reason the goods do not suit you when you receive them, you may return them and get your money back. No explanation required. Only state you want your money back. Can anything be fairer? Our prices are based on the smallest possible margins and it makes no difference whether your order amounts to $1 or $100, the price will be the same. Compare the above illustrations with the styles carried by your local dealer, and note the difference. Why not have the newest styles? • Send for our catalogue of fall styles. It's free. It contains hu...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

RANCH AND RANGE. Vol. 4, No. 35 "WIDE TIRES" ARE BEST. Practical Tests Prove Them Superior to Narrow Tires—The Movement of Ranch and Range Endorsed. By E. H. LIBBY. _ am glad to see that Ranch, and Range lias inaugurated a movement for the enact ment of a law by which the use of wide tired wagons shall be regulated within the State of Washington. Knowing from experience and observation that wide tired wagons greatly assist in the betterment of roads and streets in most European countries: and in many of our Eastern states, and having seen how the narrow tired wagons used in the Northwest have churned into a worse state the muddy roads of the high lands, and ground to powder the lighter material of the roads of the low lands, I have done what I could to promote the use of wide tires. When we first undertook the V ineland enterprise, we could not find a wide tired wagon for our own use for sale in any north western town. Even the great wagon manu facturing companies of Portland kept n...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

4 SWINE BREEDING. By S. H. SHANNON. The breeding and rearing of swine is a very important branch of farming. It is a subject upon which a great deal might be said and would require a good deal more time than I have at my disposal this evening. However, I propose to deal with a few of the most important details. The first thing we will consider is shelter, as that is one of the most important items. Every farmer should provide his hogs with good comfortable quarters, both for feeding and sleeping. They need not be expensive, but the sleeping department must be dry and free from draughts. It should be floored and supplied with good clean bedding, which should be changed at least once a week or oftener if re quired. On a great many farms the hogs have no particular place, but are left to shift for themselves as best they can. We cannot expect good results from them unless they are properly cared for. A farmer should not keep more hogs than he has feed for, but every farm should have at...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

WHY FARMERS DO NOT SHIP BUTTER. It is a curious fact that farmers who are wide awake in other matters, who will seek with a good deal of effort the best market for other produce, are so lax concerning the gale of the dairy produce when that produce consists chiefly of butter. I believe one of the prime reasons why the butter is sold at the home grocery store for whatever it will bring, instead of being ship ped to a larger market, is because a good many do not know just how to go to work to s Mp their butter. They feel a little shy of commission men, and may be some have rea sons for this. I think most of us have a les ion to learn; there are few whom I know who have not sooner or later been caught by a commission "shark." They are not satis fied may be with the returns from the man with whom they have been dealing, and as soon as a farmer begins shipping his butter his name is learned and his address and then the way is opened for some unprincipled dealer to send out circulars and ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

6 A PROBLEM TO SOLVE. By D. M- SHOULES. Much has been said lately in the papers about the codlin moth, and as we have just arrived at the end of the season it is a good time to sum the results of our past ef forts to fight this worst of all fruit pests — I might safely put it stronger and say worse than all other fruit pests, and see if we can not devise some more effective method in future. In recording my observations in re gard to the habits of this insect and my criti cisms regarding the methods recommended for his extinction by our State Horticultural Society and other wise men, I am aware that, not being a scientific observer, or even a college professor, the wiseacres will be af ter me with their little clubs, but if my ef forts will cause others to observe the habits of this pest more closely I shall be amply re paid and can stand the clubbing—if I don't club back. The life history of this insect, it seems to me, needs rewriting badly. In my search af ter light on this subje...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

WHAT I SAW. I looked over the vast wheat fields of Eastern Washington while riding through a section of it recently on the Great North ern, and I saw that the country had a more prosperous aspect than it had even a year ago; more improvements being made, more buildings being built. 1 saw with great pleasure that the fall rains did not catch the wheat unthreshed ;s it had a year ago. In the two different sections of our great country I saw two different methods em ployed. In the above named region, Eastern Wash ington, I saw that a large share of the straw stacks were burned up and thus completely wasted, the same as has been done in past years. In the other region, Minnesota, I saw that the farmers were not burning their straw stacks but were letting them stand and rot. Straw stacks in all stages of decay could be seen scattered all along the line. Then here and there, the manure thus made would be seen spread over the land. It looked as if the farmers there found it profitable to m...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

8_ Ranch and Range ISSUED KVKRY THURSDAY. In the Interests of the Farmers, Horticulturists, and Stockmen of Washington' Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Utah, British Columbia. published BY TEE RANCH AND RANGE COMPANY. Conducted by - MILLER FREEMAN Assistant Editor - H. M. WALLACE, A. B. Editorial Offices, .... Seattle, Wash. business offices: Seattle, - - - 315-316 Pioneer building. Spokane, - - Suite F Hypotheek bank building. subscription, in advance, - $1.00 per year. Address all communications to Ranch and Range, 315-316 Pioneer building, Seattle, Washington. Not an orchardist reading the article of D. M. Shoules appearing in this issue on the codlin moth, but will be impressed with the soundness of his arguments. It brings to an issue before the fruitgrowers of this state the problem of whether the methods advocated and made compulsory by law for the destruction of our fruit pests, are accomplishing the ends designed. Dur ing the past two years spraying in the man ner and time and with...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

boxes and doing their own packing; thus the farmer gets $20 per ton, net, for his apples. It is estimated that Palouse will ship from twelve to" fifteen carloads of twenty tons each. • • * In connection with this demand in the east and in Europe for our fruit, we quote below from the Orange Judd Farmer in regard to the extent of the apple crop: This crop in the United States is smaller than it has been since reliable statistics have been collected. The total supply from the 1898 crop of the United States is 27,000,000 bbls., as compared with something over 40, --000,000 bbls. last year and 70,000,000 in the record-breaking crop of 1896. The failure is widespread, reaching from the Pacific Coast to Maine, and in none of the states does the output of fruit approach an average. (This is not true, however, for ouwn famous Wash ington, where the crop is not a failure.) In the great apple states of the central west the crop is almost a total failure, although the situation in Michigan is ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

10 OUR GREAT WHEAT DISCISSION. Do Not Fail To Read This Carefully and Thoughtfully, Then Answer the Questions, and AH Thus Ex change Experiences Through Our Columns. In 1897 there was harvested in this state 22,000,000 bushels of wheat, and the crop for 1898 is about 19,000,000 bushels. If by slight changes in methods of culture or by the introduction of new varieties of wheat better adapted to our climate than that now grown, the average yield could be raised one bushel per acre, it would mean an increase of not far from one million bush els of wheat per year in the state. It is prob able that a thorough understanding of the principles involved in wheat culture would give rise to an increase of five or ten bushels per acre. The English farmer today pro duces 45 bushels of wheat per acre on land that has been farmed a thousand years, but he does not use any haphazard methods in his farming. He takes advantage of every principle revealed by the investigation of scientists. The great ...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

CURES INJURED CHICKENS. 1 wish our readers to know of one special remedy that I have come to consider as in valuable in my home and at my poultry yards. The article in question is listerine. Every physician to whom you may apply for information will assure you that of antisep tics it is one of the very best ever known, and though of comparatively recent discov ery is widely in vogue and good repute among surgeons and physicians. For burns, bviases and cuts we have turned confidently to this remedy and always with best results, but it is as a remedy for injured fowls that I am offering it now. Listerine may be purchased at any drug store. It is a clear white liquid, bear a strong odor of wintergreen, and the usual price is 10 cents per ounce. A wound that is kept dampened with a cloth with listerine will never do otherwise than heal rapidly, and where it is carefully applied blood pois oning need never be feared. An occasional chick or older fowl had met with accidents of a serious n...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

12 PACIFIC MARKET FOR DAIRY PRODUCTS. We give in this connection the opinion of one of our exchanges, the Practical Dairy man, concerning markets for our products in our new Pacific possessions, especially for dairy products. The eyes of the nation arc directed toward the new territory annexed and probably to be annexed by the United States, in the form of islands in the Pacific ocean. Some of these islands have a large population. It is not yet settled how much of the Philippine Islands will come under the dominion of the United States. There is a population of five millions of people in these islands, open to the markets of the United States. Little or no dairy products are produced, and the pro bability is that a large demand will be cre ated in the near future in these islands for American dairy products. Condensed milk, butter and cheese all find ready sale. Not only that, but the possibilities of extending the demand for these products into Asia are unlimited. This is a matter...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Ranche and range. — 17 November 1898

fIARKET REPORT. SEATTLE. The apple market is steady with a proba bility of a rise in the future. Apples—Fancy, 75c(0)$l; very fancy, $l<o> 1.25; apples, cooking, 35@65c. Pears cut but very little ligure in the market now. Pears are 25c@l. Qu.nces—sl.2s a box. Fancy Yakima burbank potatoes are $13; native stock, $B@l2. M ' , Celery, 400 per doz; lettuce, 10c: hot house lettuce, 40c; new onions, 75c for silverskins; new cabbage, %c per lb for native; parsnips, 75c per sack; cauli flower, 35@750 per doz; new turnips, 50c per sack; river sweet potatoes, VAc; Mer ced sweets, l%c; huckleberries, s<§>6c. Carrots, 50c per sack; beets, 65Cy/75c per sack; cranberries, $9 per bbl; pumpkins, %c. Bran ls selling at $14 and shorts at $15. Both, however, are getting higher in price. PAYING PRICES. Butter is a little weaker on low grades; the general price remains the same. . 2:77 Butter—Ranch, 15@20c; creamery, 22® 26c. Eggs are very firm, 28@30c. Cheese market is firm at ll@l2c. The s...

Publication Title: Ranche And Range
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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