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Elephind.com contains 5,371 items from Ranch, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1906

J^- 7^^B| ■ Continues to be the one reliable Km n^H^l I remedy for Spavins, Ring; H /'^"T^^^l bone«, Curb., Splints »nd B/KEffVUTS \Wm all form* of lameness. ■SRWINCI)Rt/M KENDALL'S SPAVIN CURE Bhr^^flKtH outscmr. »bottle A for It. All ■ '^B d ror ,iiii.rnfqii»ll«<lf.'Tf«aillyuM. ■I ■ Hil Book, A ZWntiM on ttu llortr.trm. ■ ■ ■■ Or. B.J.KENDALL CO. K^B WJ-M Inotburg F«ll«. V»rmoni._ Brief History of the Bordeau Mixture, Our Chief Fungicide. (J. G. Hopkins, Inspector, King Co.) About 1807 Benedict Provost gave an account of how he prevented the germination of mildew or the spores of fungus, a disease commonly known as "carie" or "carbon" (smut) of corn. His statement regarding the results of his experiments is as follows: "The amount of sulphate of copper really necessary to give water the power of preventing the germination of the spores in a low temperature does not amount to one four hundred thou sandths of its weight and one twelve hundred thousandths retards germina tion." In...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 January 1906

16 QiETATABILITY I Sometimes the English language seems to fail to possess a word that will express a meaning which X*|l||y, we wish to forcibly present, so we take the liberty of coining the above word to convey to our T*JIL readers the merits that theSHARPLES TUBULAR SEPARATORS possess over and •^iferv above all other makes. It makes a whole lot of difference to you, whether you have to set your Sep- Mil/I milm fJ\ arator Bowl in a special vise, to use a wrench FOUR TIMES a day, or whether you only have JM to unscrew the bowl by hand, as you do in the Tubular.. It makes a lot of difference to you whether HI Ilrs you have to examine TWICE A DAY and keep filled several oil cups and oil holes in your Sep llßfy^rv /^ arator, or whether you only have to pour a tablespoonful or so into an oil reservoir once a week, as iHuliijJ! is the case with the Tubular, and whether you are going to have the frame and floor all around you |^Slfti^^^^%\ sloppy with oil, or absolutely clean, as will be...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

THE RANCH . Vol. XXIII. No. 3. Farming as Compared With Other Occupations ATIME comes to most men when it is necessary for them to decide the following ques tions: What will I be? What will 1 do? For what line of business shall I prepare myself? If this matter of choos:ng a calling comes before him at an early age he is generally assist ed in making his choice by his par ents or his friends, or circumstances over which he has little control may conspire to influence his selection. If he 's raised upon a farm or in a farming community he will find many who will advise him to "be something better than a farmer." As if there could be an occupation more honor able, more independent or more re liable than farming. Those who argue that farming is below other occupa tions are usually lacking in knowl edge of the world, of modern agricul ture and of most other lines of bus iness. Here my reader may interrupt me by saying: "You have written much like that before." Yes, and I shall continue t...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

2 (enough to see the other s'de of life) I have lived and worked among farm ers. I have had some experience In agriculture, have had my reverses, have made failures and have made my record of mismanagement the same as others have done; but my eyes have been open, and in looking back 1 find (hat those farmers who stuck to the farm, who read and studied their business and who aspired to make farming a success and a delight have, as a rule, won wealth, honor and leisure. I see the wives of such farmers well dressed and intelligent, able to take an occasional trip to the city and to take in most of the big events of the nation. I see the child ren of such farmers growing up strong and healthy. They have attended good schools, have taken some school work away from home, and are an honor to the farm and the nation. But farming means study as well as work, and while the man who does not study may hold his job he can not advance. As one who has seen a little of the world, let me say to the ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

THE RANCH Office: 376 Colman Building, Seattle. Issued the First and Fifteenth of Month My the Ranch Publishing Company P. L. AXLING - - Editor Associate editors K. WALUEN, H. L. BLANCHARD Subscription, in advance, one year 50 cents; six months, 30 cents. If on time, subscriptions will be $1. Seattle sub scribers are required to pay $1.00 per year, on account of local postage. Agents wanted in every town to so licit subscriptions. Good commissions and salaries paid to hustlers. The paper is sent to each subscriber until an order to discontinue is received from the subscriber. We must be noti fied in writiriK. by letter or postal card, when a subscriber wishes his paper stopped. Returning the paper will not answer, as we cannot find it on our list from the name alone on the paper. We must have both name and address, and all arrearages or dues must be paid as required by law. Date of expiration is shown on your paper by address label containing your name. Failing to receive the paper ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

4 HORTICULTURE r. WALDEN In place of the usual dish up on hor ticulture, in this issue will be found the editor's paper read at the meet ing of the Washington State Horticul tural Association at North Yakima, January 9 to 12. The paper on "Horti cultural Laws, Wise and Otherwise" was well received by many of our fruit growers in the state. It was re ported to me that some persons present said that the paper was against horti cultural laws —that it maintains th.it they are not necessary. That may be. The writer disclaims any intention of trying to supply any one with fhe faculty to understand. That is "aboon his might." However, if any one who reads over this paper carefully still thinks that it maintains that laws are not necessary and will so inform the editor, he will pay him a good price for his picture. * * * In our next issue there will be a write-up of the horticultural conven tion at North Yakima and of the week spent at Pullman. There are a number of inquiries present that w...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

seemed to have furnished the people with any instruction at all. As it is from the instruction of the growers in better methods of work that we get our greatest good, as above shown, this should be insisted upon and car ried out with greater efficiency. The greatest trouble with the law-breakers comes from the ignorance of the peo ple. Some are willful and will not do what they know they ought to do. These should be admonished and in structed and if they persist, then, let thorn suffer the penalty of the law without mercy. But now we come to the purpose of the law. Is it to make a man raise better fruit? No, provided no one suffers but himself. Just as well try to compel a man to raise better horses, cattle, sheep, hogs and even children. This is outside of the realm of the law. A man should be allowed to do as he pleases with his own, provided always he does not injure the well being of others. A man should not be molested in raising Canada thist les or skunks on his farm, provided...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

6 HOUSEHOLD How Women Waste Their Time. There have often come to our ears laments from women over the "lack of time that they had for reading " This is a plain case of there being some thing wrong with the arrangement of things in the home. A woman who has plenty of time for reading is liable to do herself more harm than good, and at the same time neglect more important duties. One writer has said that "reading is a dissipation, and that few of the books that women read do them any real good." This is too true, but the worst feature of the whole matter is the neglect of many other things more important. The children's clothes may need mend ing or the stockings need darning. Reading at the time when this work should be done takes much valuable time from the household work. It sel dom happens that the woman who reads at such times can give her whole thought to the subject about which 3he may be reading, thus both the time spent in reading and that ought to have been spent in mending o...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

POULTRY ■ ■ H. L. BLANCHARD Incubators —Advantages and Disad vantages of Using Them. The writer has had several years ex perience in hatching and rearing chick ens in the natural way, as well as by artificial methods. The artificial meth od possesses many advantages, also a few seeming disadvantages, as shown, we think, by our experience. In the writer's opinion, the incubator has come to stay. Under present condi tions those flocks of hens, unaided by the incubator and brooder, intelligent ly operated, must necessarily take sec ond place in the business world. Prior to our installing an incubator, on an average about fifty of our best Barred Plymouth Rock layers were required for incubating and brooding purposes, for from three to four months, at least, every spring—at the time of the year when the hens would lay no less than one half of their number of eggs for the season, say, at least 80 eggs each. These eggs are worth at the average market price 2% cents each or $2.00; or at th...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

8 THE DAIRY Washing the Milk Vessels. Speaking of the matter of washing milk vessels Prof. H. E. Van Norman, of the Pennsylvania state college, gives the following suggestions: As soon as vessels are emptied, rinse them with lukewarm water, if avail able; if not, cold water. Wash thor oughly in water as warm as can be comfortably worked in, using sufficient alkaline washing powder to cut the grease. Then rinse in boiling water, or as near as possible. It would be a little better to use two waters, one to rinse the alkaline water off and the second to simply scald it. In ord inary practical work, this is more trouble than most people will take, so that one rinsing with sufficient water is reasonably satisfactory. This vessel should then be turned up to drain and dry. If left hot, it should dry without rusting. In dairy practice we recommend the use of a brush while washing, and then not wiping the tinware with a towel. Experiments performed in our laboratory with tinware which was st...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

hundred and seventy-fourth to Urn two hundred and eighty-seventh in clueive. The period of gestation was the snme for male as for female calves. When twins were born the time was five days less than the general average and eight days less than the average of the single births of the same cows. Raising Motherless Calves. A practical stock raiser says that to those who have had experience in rais ing "motherless" calves what he has to write about the subject may be of no interest, but it may be of material benefit to the novices Mn the manage ment of stock. During the last ten years he has raised a number of calves taken from their mothers quite early in life and so far has experienced no serious difficulty in the effort to teach them to eat and dtink and finally nurse them to maturity. He thinks it best to take the calf from the mother be fore it is allowed to suck if practicable. Take the milk from the cow, which will probably be scant at the first few milkings; hold the calf in suc...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

10 THE, FIELD l.rigation and Development. There has been much timely discus sion of the Irrigation problem and the justice of appropriating public funds to develop sections of the country, bringing the products from such im proved land into competition with products mown by farmers who con tributed to the cost of such improve ment. It has been frequently asserted that there would be as much justice in Appropriating public money to drain the water-soaked lands of New Eng land to make them productive as in appropriating public money to add water to arid land for the same pur pose. There can be no doubt of the fairness of such comparison did the former land exist in such extensive vactS as to allow the improvement to be made upon an extensive scale atid thereby enable the government to ■lake expensive outlays which individ uals could not afford to make, but to ward the cost of which they would contribute in the form of annual as sessments. This we understand to be the policy of the gov...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

THE INSTITUTE Remove Duty on Alcohol. Hood River, Ore.. Jan. 20, 1906. To the BdltOT of The Ranch:—The article "About the Duty on Alcohol" ought to be road nnd reread by every one who reads your valuable paper. If people in general would realize the groat benefits of free alcohol, they would no doubt hurry up their repre sentatives to pass the law removing the internal revenue on alcohol. A most interesting article appeared about a year ago in "Popular Mechanics" in Chicago describing the great benefit derived by the German people from free alcohol. It not only stimulated the raising of potatoes, etc., but also the machinery trade, as small motors for family use were brought into use. as well as all kinds of lamps, etc. Yours respectfully, A. NIEHAUS. Growing Mushrooms for Home Use. Edible wild mushrooms may be found in pastures and woods in great abundance throughout the growing season, but especially during the au tumn months. While these would make a good table food, many people ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

12 HORTICULTURE (Continued from Page 5) tailment. Forbidding mon to have in their possession any of the infected fruit, is a farce. The codling moth is not scattered in an infected district by possessing such fruit nor by telling or giving it away, provided it is not carried into a non-infected district. If we should send a car load of so called wormy apples to Seattle or Ta coma the probabilities are that they would be condemned and dumped into the bay. It probably would be the duty of the inspectors, as the law now reads, to do this, but would this do any good so far as the spreading of codling moth is concerned? Not a particle; for there is not an orchard in either King or Pierce county that is not already infected with this in sect. The fact is that when we have turned this law over and considered it in all its aspects we will come to the conclusion that we should not inter fere with a man who possesses infect ed fruit or sells it or gives it away, nor with the man who buys it, ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

The Truth About Alt <lH cl km^^ A An address by _^2&i^^^)^C^k. N.C. Dunlap, vnPN^S S^\ ' Manager Jfi*a|Sfc^^^'^a^Ol Watson's Ranch, H^vJIS ijfeSFPP (The largest in •Yifl E»f Jfflf ''"' world) vfl HHUUH Kirn Kearney, Neb. TjMul K& has been re &KJ&TXS&SK^m?/t printed for ~~ l*!Hw'#Cifflr^MaSa<rce distribu- IMBmB»M IMWW»tion by the VSa^ijjJF— -jjf I^^U«/ makers of the ""**' world famous Cahoon B rEd<2Lt Seeder • v:v Write for copy now to Goodell Company. S6 Main St., Antrim. N. H. Rubber Stamps Stencils, Enamel and Aluminum Letters, Badges, Numbering Machines, Notary and Corporate Seals, etc. Send for catalog No. 25. Absolutely eastern prices. Phoenix Commercial Stamp Works, Baker Bldg., 2nd Aye. S. and Main St., Seattle. SPECIAL WANT COLUMN Two Cent« a Word Baoh Insertion. FOR SALE —Holstein bull, 4 years old, weight 1710 lbs. J. Nelson, Thornton, Wash. SMALL, complete creamery outfit for sale cheap. J. Tveter, 1417 South X St., Tacoma, Wash. FOR SALE —In ...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

14 LIVE STOCK Greatest Meat Surplus Here. No other country produces so great a surplus of meat as the United States. During the year ending June 30, 1904. the exports of live meat animals and packing house products were valued at $217,000,000. No other country, ex cept near-by Ireland, sends so many cattle to the English market. The ex ports of United States cattle to Brit ish ports during 1904 amounted to 387,000 head, valued at $36,000,000, and along with them were exported 223.000 sheep, worth nearly $2,000,000. Belgium has become an important destination for United States cattle, and more than 18,000 were exported there during 1904. The cattle ship ments to Cuba, which prior to 1898 sel dom reached ten head a year, amount ed in 1904 to 135,000 head, valued at $2,000,000. Beef is exported from the United States chiefly in the form of fresh meat, and this is nearly all sent to British markets. This trade has in creased while the exports of other kinds of beef have become less duri...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

■Hi >^H I BPAVINS, M. CURBS AND BPLINTB. ■^vSPM/IN CURL?! I s , . boiiui 6 for »B. ■mfej^Bt \ I All I>r,iorl«t.. Write for Fi« ■^ftH H^li ■•Tw.tli.onlh.Hom." ■^■■■flti DR. B. J. KENDALL Co., ■ ■■ WJ Eno.bura rails, VI. tional Park, according to Superintend ent Pitcher in a report just issued. One hundred tons of fine hay were raised in the government field near the Gar diner arch and stacked near the sold iers' quarters. Superintendent Pitcher says that three years ago a deer was seldom seen in the vicinity of Mammoth hot springs and as an experiment a few bales of alfalfa hay were scattered around near the parade ground. The next day a dozen black tail deer made their appearance, the number steadily increased and now comprises over 100. The animals quickly lost all fear of human beings and are not even startl ed by the firing of the evening gun within 100 yards of them, but show much more interest in the lowering of the flag from the staff in the center of their feeding groun...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 1 February 1906

16 HOW TO DECIDE One Man and a Boy Li NU^ - ! I CAN SPREAD ALL THE MANURE ON THE AVERAGE FARM WITH § WELL, JOHN, have you decided | TWO OB rouß HORSES and A B what kind of cream separa- | ■ /^WH^\\^\ get a TU3ULAR! y°u know ' wi" 'U~_ uMM'lrtlSwll separators; besides, you know that I .. _ mm ",ru:r- 1 m ross MANURE SPREADER how lightly Si Jones' Tubular turns." J\UJJ lflflllUllX* UK Ill^ll/I-rfll *^L S^. "A" right, wife, you shall have your Xll(j do it better and quicker than Tour men and sis horses ran in the old -W^^ . A , a w i h-.H ahnut marip un mv mind way. It breaks the chunks up line, no matter how hard and dry they arc. way. I had about made up my mina so simple and strong any boy can run it. The action is entirely automatic. that the Tubular was the only ma- the quantity can be changed while the machine is spreading, without w . ta tVla TVvam .. . .*x-. •i x. • ♦ ♦ * leaving the seat, It's ready to load when the pile is reached. The bot- Note the Low-Down chine made that s...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1906

■b k 1^B§ |9 Bj^^===^^^^^^B._k tI °J5 BP i^H «Be^=^._...k. BE B i^ittii- . Vol. XXIII. No. 4. Fertilizers for Asparagus Salt was long considered an essen tial fertilizer for asparagus. The nat ural habitat of asparagus is the sea shore, and it was reasoned, therefore, that salt was beneficial to this crop. In modern commercial practices, how ever, beds of asparagus have been found to yield as well without salt as with it, and this has raised the question whether the use of salt is to be considered essential in the cul ture of asparagus. E. Walker, of the Arkansas experi IAMS' MOUEI-DE-MIKCHEY (33252) —BELGIAN STALLION THREE YEARS OLD, BLACK, WEIGHT 1940 LBS ; FIRST * PRIZE WINNER AT NEBRASKA STATE FAIR IN 1905—A LOW DOWN DUTCHMAN HORSE—ONE OP 148 "TOPPERS" TO BE SOLD AT $1,000 AND $1,500 BY PRANK IAMS, (See Article, Page 12.) ment station, has recently made an experiment to determine the value of salt in asparagus culture. One-half of a bed containing one-seventh of an acre was fert...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — The ranch. — 15 February 1906

2 of the four. The addition of bone and potash, or of bone, potash and nitrate Of BOdl to the complete fertilizer. M in tin 1 cisc of plats No. 3 and 4, increased the coat oi i in- fertiliser per acre frith' out giving any increase in the crop but rather a decrease. During the years 1903 and 1904 the largest yields were obtained on the plats fertilized with manure. Summarizing the whole matter of using sail on th<> asparagus bed, the investigations at the various stations Indicate that Bait may be used witti henefU in the small asparagus bed of the garden and that early spring ap plications of nitrate of soda are not likely to be of benefit in securing an increased cut of stalks the same sea son. As regards commercial fertiliz ers and barnyard manure for aspar agus, if the land is in good condition a well-balanced commercial fertilizer may produce as good yields as manure and may be cheaper. Concerning the Road Law. A subscriber at Oak Harbor writes The Ranch asking informatio...

Publication Title: Ranch, The
Source: Chronicling America [US Library of Congress]
Country/State of Publication: Washington, United States
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