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Elephind.com contains 2,606 items from Mountain Laurel, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Page 30 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

PAGE 14 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1987 EARLY INFLUENCE OF RELIGION IN THE BLUE RIDGE (PART I) The church has played a great role in our nation's history since its founding. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Blue Ridge mountain region. Every faith has had some outstanding men who exhibited great faith and accomplished remarkable records. Among these men was James Waddell, a blind preacher of the Presbyterian faith. Little is known of his early history, but such information as has been handed down indicates that he received elementary and then higher degree education in an academy. His first minist-y was in the Northern Neck of Virginia. From there he removed to Gordonsville about 1785, where he gained renown as "The Great Blind Expositor". William Wirt, a learned writer of his day, made it a point to travel to Gordonsville to hear James Waddell preach in 1803. He was so moved by his eloquence that he wrote a classic essay on the minister and his sermon. An early historic church...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 31 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

THE LAUREL FOUNDATION Here it is January and the New Year, 1987 has begun. As we look forward to the goals of the Laurel Foundation, that of preserving on film the heritage of our mountain people, places and way of life, we see so much before us. Alas, we also see that the old year, 1986 is already in the past. An old school house near us was struck by lightening and burned to the ground in 1986. We don't have a single photograph of it. It is now only pictured in the minds of the people in the local community. Many younger members of the community probably didn't even realize its significance. It was lost to time. How many other parts of our heritage were lost in 1986 that we didn't even realize, can never regain? We mourn the loss of every one of our older citizens because when they pass, a vast store house of knowledge goes with them, never to be regained. The goal of the Laurel Foundation is to waste as little time as possible capturing those memories. Photojournalism Jim Waters ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 32 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

PAGE 16 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1987 SUNSHINE TALES "WHEN MAMA AND PAPA WERE BAPTIZED" Have you ever recalled some experience you had years before" just from an odor or "whiff' of something? I have, many times, and it is sometimes a very pleasant experience. If I smell sawdust anyplace, I'm instantly carried back to a summer when I was a small child in the small town of DeKoven, Kentucky. Our family, consisting of Mama, Papa, Alberta, Dick, Catherine, Walter (a tiny baby) and I, lived in a four-room house in this small town. Our house was on the corner of the block and on the other side of the house was a vacant lot. The Baptist Church officers made arrangements to hold a series of meetings in a tent that summer and they "pitched" their tent on the vacant lot that was next to our house. This was very exciting to us children. The men from the church made preparations for the big meeting. They made their benches from rough lumber from the saw mill and then they made a platform for th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 33 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

James Still is Appalachian treasure. The voice that speaks out through his poetry is one that has known and loved and lived the Kentucky land and its people. Becausd of James Still, Kentucky life will be recorded in literature history in mucfh the same way as Chauncer wrote off the everyday people in his Cantehurv Tales. Not so much real stories or rteal people, but composites, and richly captured characters, truly representative of the people and the place. His words are embroidered together a crazy quilt, native to these hills. James Still is into his 80th year of life. Over 50 of those |ears have been spent in Kentucky. He found Wolfpen Creek a good place to write. Since he didn't own a car until he was 50, a lot of his traveling was done by foot. As he traveled among the people of Eastern Kentucky, he made and recorded the way people talked and lived. These notes formed the basis for James Still's novel, "River Of Earth", the story of a cold miner's family during the Depression....

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 34 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

PAGE 18 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1987 WORK AND PLAY DOWN ON THE FARM BY: NANCY KESSLER I was born and raised on a mountain farm in Southwest Virginia and grew up in the early 1920's and 30's. My father started farming from scratch you might say, on his share of the land from his father's (a Civil War veteran) farm and the shares he bought from his brothers and sisters, about 100 acres. Gradually he bought adjoining land and increased his acreage to well over 200 acres, clearing most of it himself with pick, ax, and shovel. He was an honest, hardworking, God fearing man with as much education as the local school offered at that time, and he dearly loved the land and his farm. He and my mother were married on Valentines Day, February 14, 1906, at her father's home and began housekeeping that same year in a four room house he helped to build. More rooms were added as the family increased. Eventually there were nine children, four boys and five girls. (In order of birth - Lenora, Jessie...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 35 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

LOVE WITH A CAPITAL "L" My clumsy little fingers searched for the right notes to my favorite song. "Jesus loves me, this I know," I sang loudly. I was so engrossed in my "music" that I did not hear my sister, Vergie, come into the room. "Honey, I have to talk to you," she said softly. Her big, brown eyes filled with tears. She put her arms lovingly around me and said, "You know how sick Mama has been. Well, Honey, she's dead! We just found out; she died last night!" I whirled around on the organ stool. "No, not Mama! She can't be dead! Not my Mama!" I cried. Only those who have experienced the tragedy of losing their Mother in early childhood can know the mixture of feelings I had. Vergie hugged me close and her long, dark hair brushed my cheek as she tried to comfort me. We clung together weeping in sadness, anger, and bewilderment; feeling lost, alone and so very frightened. "What will we do without Mama?" I wailed. I was six and Sis, as I called her, was thirteen. "Honey, Don't c...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 36 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

PAGE 20 MOUNTAIN LAUREL JANUARY, 1987 ALL FOR THE LOVE OF BESSE MAE Editor's Note... Robert G. Back is the author of the book, "Hear My Laughter, See My Tears." It is available by writing Robert G. Back, Box 123, RT. 1, Medarryville, IN 47947. The price is $7.50 plus SI.OO for postage and handling. There is only a limited number still available. Buster Blevins and Jake Crawford had one distinct thing in common - they both steadfastly contended that one was stronger than the other. There was an abundance of evidence to support both men's claim, making it impossible for the folks in the Bulan, Kentucky coal camp to give the nod to either. That being the ever-present case, Buster and Jake were constantly being put in positions requiring that they prove themselves. In coal camps where there was never enough of the extraordinary, the reputation as the strongest man in Perry County had to be maintained at all cost. Buster was a man of average height but weighed in the neighborhood of 200 ...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 37 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

ALL FOR THE LOVE OF BESSE MAE door knob as hard as ya can. Don't turn loose fer nuthin'. I'm gonna open the door with my teeth while you try with all ya might to keep me from turnin' the knob. Remember now, hang on fer dear life an' don't turn loose no matter what." Bessie Mae nodded and smiled her sweetest smile. The others followed Jake outside to witness his incredible show of strength. \ Once outside with the door closed, Jake yelled to Bessie Mae. "Okay, Bessie Mae, take a good holt an' don't let go!" Jake bent down, opened his mouth as wide as possible, and wrapped his teeth around the door knob. He gave a slight turn of his head and stopped abruptly. A noise that was a cross between a groan and a deep chested whine came from him. He opened his mouth wide and tried to back away from the door knob but quickly discovered that he couldn't move. The bitter cold welded his tongue firmly to the metal door knob, and he couldn't pry it free. His grunts and whines gave way to loud, ang...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 38 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

M?im i ■ MOUNT AIRY, N.C. ' 740 AAA <zoz> ! NORTHWEST NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUNTWEST VIRGINIA'S MOST POWERFUL AM STATION [3o3g] (919) 786-6111 How To Keep In Touch With Your Money V e can offer you- * a simple easy-to-understand checking account * our certificate of deposits come in a variety of sizes and terms including the popular Individual Retirement Accounts... * our VISA card with an interest rate of 16°/o and NO annual fee is hard to beat.... * also our many types of mortgage loans yvith fixed and adjustable payment plans are loans you can live with now and in the future... * if a consumer loan is your need for what ever reason; a car, home repair, a consolidation loan or a vacation-no matter what the loan reason we do our very best to work out a plan that's comfortable for you... From this day forward be smart about banking! Let us serve you. For more information, or to open your apcounts, stop at any of our convenient locations [1537] lnToJs)n&gt...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 39 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

BACKROADS (Continued from page 22) 08.5 (0.3) At this stop sign we will turn right onto SR 685. 09.3 (0.8) On our right is Skyview Baptist Church. 09.4 (0.1) At this stop sign we will turn right onto US Highway 52 North, toward Hillsville, Virginia. 09.5 (0.1) On our right is the homeplace of J. Sidna Allen. It is a historic landmark and open to the public during the summer months. On the morning of March 14, 1912 shots were exchanged in the Carroll County Courthouse in Hillsville, Virginia. Some said it was a matter of politics and others said it was caused by the lawless "Allen Outlaws". Everyone agrees, however, that a tragedy struck the county that resulted in the shooting deaths of five people that gloomy March morning and resulted in the execution of Floyd and Claude Allen on March 28, 1913. Sidna Allen served over 13 years in prison and was finally pardoned by Governor Harry F. Byrd on April 29, 1926. Since my mother was an Allen of Scotch descent from North Carolina, I'll re...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 40 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 January 1987

fh y HEART OF THE BLUE RIDGE T\cuniain W' ' A Copyright 1986 Laurel Publications Inc. JANUARY 1987 Monthly Journal Of Mountain Life PAGE 28 gurgling through a glade or a deer standing in a roadside meadow or an old weathered barn tucked away in a mountain hollow, our BACKROAD column allows us to share our favorite places with you each month. HOW TO FOLLOW BACKROAD TOURS. BACKROAD tours always make a complete loop back to the point where we started. The underlined numbers at the beginning of each paragraph indicate the total number of miles we've traveled from our point of beginning. The numbers in parenthesis () indicate the distance from the last point of interest that we passed. This month our BACKROAD Tour will begin and end on the Blue Ridge Parkway at Orchard Gap, Virginia between Parkway milepost 193 and 194. Our entire drive will cover a total distance of 32.1 miles and will require at least one (1) hour from beginning to end. Traveling north on the Blue Ridge Parkway from Fa...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

FEBRUARY 1987 5/E? JLi NTHI.Y IOIIRNAI. OF MOUNTAIN I IFF. © 1986 LAUREL PUBLICATIONS INC. FEBRUARY 1987 MONTHLY JOURNAL OF MOUNTAIN LIFE © 1986 LAUREL PUBLICATIONS INC, 50 YEARS OF VALENTINES It all began in 1937, fifty years ago this summer. I guess you could call it a permanent Valentine for me and my sister because if James Matthews and Gladys Hal brook hadn't met, we wouldn't be here. James and Gladys became the people my sister and I lovingly came to know as Mother and Daddy. But, that was years later and another story. Now, back to how it all began, a Valentine story that occurred not in February, but in July. 1937 - The Great Depression - The place, Stokesdale and Kernersville, North Carolina, two small towns about fifteen miles apart. That's the closest description, because my father's family lived a few miles outside of Kernersville, in the country and my mother's family lived a few miles outside of Stokesdale, in the country. Mother's family raised tobacco and Daddy's fam...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

PAGE 2 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1987 NEW PREACHER IN TOWN BY: ERNEST MARKWOOD PRITCHARD During the winter, Father conducted a series of revival meetings in our church. All of our family attended every night, as did most of the residents of Wallace. As the nights were very dark, with few gas jet street light, we carried a lantern with us. Often, however, we youngsters became separated from the grown folk and traveled home alone. On one such occasion, Chalmers Ruster and I happened to step off the narrow boardwalk and fall into the creek which ran alongside. Chalmers had hold of my arm at the time, and I always said that he stepped off and pulled me in after him. I scrambled out of the creek immediately and ran all the way home to dry out, leaving Chalmers far behind. Winter was also the time when crowds often gathered to skate on the creek near our house, building great fires at night for light and warmth. My friends and I were usually there, participating in all the activity. In th...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

REMEMBER WHEN... Do you remember when Folks celebrated Christmas with family gatherings and a big supper on January 6th? Snow cream was made with milk, flavoring, sugar and pure white snow? Dad would put milk, sugar and flavoring in a Karo syrup bucket and turned in a dishpan of snow until it became ice cream. Do you remember when we made a big pot of mush on a cold winter's night? When we cracked hickory nuts and black walnuts around the fireplace? When apples were in a rail pen covered with leaves and we scratched them out for munching at night? Do you remember when Grandma made a "hoe cake" in the fireplace? When the molasses from a stone crock were so stiff in the winter that they stood up straight? Do you remember apple butter stack cakes ten and twelve layers high? Pie suppers that were held at the schools with fun and games for the whole family? Do you remember studying and doing your homework by the old oil lamp? Our pretty dresses were made from the print feedbags and we co...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

PAGE 4 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1987 When we moved away from Meadows of Dan to Danville, Virginia in 1915, I was very young, around 14 years old. We got settled very comfortably and some of the family found jobs in different places. My mom and two oldest sisters went to work in the mill. I had five sisters and one brother. I was the third from the oldest. My dad ran the house and handled all the money that came in. Every spring he and my brother would go back to the mountains and stay until the weather got cold and then he would come back and take over. We almost dreaded to see him come back, as he was so hard on us girls and Mom. While my dad was gone, my mom was very lenient on us girls. She would try to see that we kept decent company as far as she could. When I became 15, she would let me have some boy friends. While World War I was brewing, my first boy friend said he would die in France with my locket around his neck. He did. My second boy friend brought me nice gifts and ask...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

CARDBOARD DOLL BY: GRACE CASH © 1987 My cardboard doll was a specially significant treasure and even now, looking back over half a century, I still consider it a childhood treasure. Its value increased after I came down with typhoid fever at which time the doll had been in my possession a year, sitting brightly, beautiful, on the mantel. I got the doll at Macedonia, a tworoom elementary school. It was a threemile walk to the schoolhouse. One year the school principal boarded at a relative's house one mile beyond where we lived. He would walk to our house, and join us for the walk to school. Yet it was another principal who awarded the doll in a Friday afternoon program. He was a tall handsome man. It was the week's end, a time for celebration. He sat on the stage, his long legs stretched lazily across the floor, seeming to enjoy the primary students and his own upper-grade students, all gathered in the long hall which was the main classroom. He found the doll in a newspaper suppleme...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

PAGE 6 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1987 NESTER FAMILY REUNION It's the second Sunday of August. In a remote nook of the Monongahela National Forest, a few miles north of Parsons, West Virginia, the mist in the glen guarding Sycamore Grove parts on cue. Brigadoon-like, the Nestor clan materializes, just as they have for nearly two hundred years. Here on the grounds of Bull Run Chapel, beneath the cloudcapped mountains marking the border of Barbour and Tucker Counties, they assemble to honor their ancestor, Jacob Nester. As young Jacob stood forlornly on the deck of the ship "Sally" watching the shrouded body of his mother disappear into the stormy Atlantic Ocean, he could not have forseen that he was bringing to this land the seed of a diverse clan whose members celebrate their heritage with unbridled joy and dedication/ Nestorville, the village Jacob founded shortly after the Revolutionary War, lies directly over the mountain from Sycamore Grove. As the buzzards and eagles fly, the di...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

NESTER FAMILY Continued From Page 6. Five more children arrived in rapid succession: Samuel, Daniel, John, Mary, and Elizabeth. From the eight firstgeneration Americans came the enormous extended family that today fills the picnic tables with platters of down-home cooking fit for emperors. Direct Nestor descendants and "marrying-in" members alike proudly proffer their special dishes to be sampled and applauded by the crowd. Throughout the afternoon, cheerful voices rise and fall in volume to balance the primitive instruments and harmonizing voices. Their straw hats tipped at rakish angles, the musicians perch jauntily on three-legged stools plucking banjos and sawing on fiddles carved from native trees by granddaddies who go back so many "greats" their descendants have lost count. The voices, unisexual in texture, mimic the twang of the stringed instruments - mysteriously hollow - like phantoms from two centuries past. Men's voices climb the scales as deftly as if their vocal chords...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

PAGE 8 MOUNTAIN LAUREL FEBRUARY, 1987 THE STRANGE, TRUE STORY OF THE BELL WITCH OF TENNESSEE BY: DON WICK Editor's Note... The following is the first of a five part series of stories sent to us by the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development. If you like "haint" stories, you're going to love this one! Adams, Tennessee - Of all the strange stories of the supernatural, there is none stranger than the 170 year old story of the Sell Witch of Tennessee, the most documented story of the supernatural in all of American history. The Bell Witch is unique because of the large number of people who had direct experiences with it. Many of these people, General Andrew Jackson among them, were of unimpeachable reputation and unquestionable reliability. Much of what follows is taken from the eyewitness accounts and interviews gathered by M.V. Ingram for his book An Authenticated History Of The Famous Bell Witch Of Tennessee published at Clarksville, Tennessee, in 1894. Among them are the eyewitn...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Mountain Laurel — 1 February 1987

EARLY INFLUENCE OF RELIGION IN THE BLUE RIDGE (PART 2) Around 1832, a northern industrialist, Asial Snow, from Pennsylvania; learning of ore deposits in Virginia made an investigative trip to the state. He arrived at Christiansburg (established in 1792) which had become an important place on the routes to the west and the southwest. Learning that there were iron ore deposit sources seventeen miles southwest of Christiansburg, he began investigating and determined that they were usable. This deposit was located near Laurel Creek and eleven miles south of present day Radford. He noted that Little River at this point had a fall in elevation of five feet within approximately eleven hundred yards making possible and practical a dam to supply industrial hydro power. Furthermore an established road went right by the sight. These features added up to about what Asial Snow had been looking for. He negotiated for and purchased the ore and the dam sites. 'He moved his family to Chrisiansburg t...

Publication Title: Mountain Laurel
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
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