ELEPHIND.COM search the world's historical newspaper archives
From:  To: 
click here to view elephind tips
Elephind Tips
To find items containing all the words:
John Quincy Adams
Simply type the words:
John Quincy Adams
To find items containing the exact phrase:
John Quincy Adams
Put the phrase in quotes:
"John Quincy Adams"
To find either of the words:
president, congressman
Type OR between the words:
president OR congressman
For more tips take a look at the search tips page.
bubble pointer to elephind tips
click here to subscribe our mailing list
Search limited to
Clear all
Title: Farm Bureau News Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 2,070 items from Farm Bureau News, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
2,070 results
Page 1 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

Vol. 54, No. 8 Racetrack to boost state's horse industry By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor GOOCHLAND—Virginia's $640 mil-lion-a-year horse industry could jump to $1 billion after a racetrack is established, an industry expert said. The Virginia Racing Commission awarded a license to Colonial Downs in October 1994 to operate a racetrack in New Kent County, just east of Richmond. A lawsuit filed by a Northern Virginia applicant for the license has halted construction of the track. But if Colonial Downs wins the court battle and constructs a track in a timely fashion, racing could begin in 1997, predicts Larry Lawrence, a Virginia Cooperative Extension horse specialist. "A racetrack will greatly benefit the hay and grain industry," said Mike Collins, a race horse trainer at Rockett's Mill Training Center in Hanover County. His wife Donna is a race horse breeder. The track will boost the tourism business and the housing industry. "People want to live near a place like Rockett's Mil...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 2 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

2 Farm Bureau Federation can certainly boast that it possesses a clear vision. To assure that the organization continues to prosper into the 21st century, the VFBF board of directors conducted a special day-long meeting July 26 and examined future needs of Farm Bureau. The session focused primarily on ways to increase the visibility of Farm Bureau through effective lobbying and media coverage. To help gain insight into these challenges, Jay Poole, director of government and community relations with Philip Morris USA, discussed effective lobbying. He told the board that Farm Bureau is the envy erf" virtually all other organizations because of its statewide grass roots infrastructure. He said that Farm Carry-over tobacco going to 'save our lives this year' By ROCKY WOMACK Special to the Farm Bureau News HALIFAX—Carry-over tobacco from the 1994 season is helping growers compensate for flood-related losses in the 1995 crop, said grower Bobby Conner. Conner and his family suffered devast...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 3 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 'Freedom to Farm' warrants further investigation by farmers If House Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts has his way, farmers in 1996 would be guaranteed a set amount of government payments. Under his plan, they could grow what they want and how much they want for the first time since farm programs were created during the Great Depression. Dubbed the "Freedom to Farm Act of 1995," Roberts says the proposal will stabilize farm spending, "while lessening the pain of reduced direct government payments to farmers over the next five to seven years." If approved, this plan would be a large part of the 1995 Farm Bill currently being crafted by Congress. "Freedom to Farm" would replace traditional farm payments with a new system of guarantees to farmers who grow feed grains, wheat, cotton and rice. Virginia raises all of these commodities except rice. Most of the feed grains, including sorghum, barley, corn and soybeans, are grown east of Interstate-95, with wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 4 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

2 Board maps out strategy for enhanced political prowess By QREQ HICKS VFBF Director of Communications GOOCHLAND—Vision is an important aspect of any successful company or organization. Based on its successes over the years, the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation can certainly boast that it possesses a clear vision. To assure that the organization continues to prosper into the 21st century, the VFBF board of directors conducted a special day-long meeting July 26 and examined future needs of Farm Bureau. The session focused primarily on ways to increase the visibility of Farm Bureau through effective lobbying and media coverage. To help gain insight into these challenges, Jay Poole, director of government and community relations with Philip Morris USA, discussed effective lobbying. He told the board that Farm Bureau is the envy of virtually all other organizations because of its statewide grass roots infrastructure. He said that Farm Carry-over tobacco going to 'save our lives this year...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 5 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 'Freedom to Farm' warrants further investigation by farmers If House Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts has his way, farmers in 1996 would be guaranteed a set amount of government payments. Under his plan, they could grow what they want and how much they want for the first time since farm programs were created during the Great Depression. Dubbed the "Freedom to Farm Act of 1995," Roberts says the proposal will stabilize faiin spending, "while lessening the pain of reduced direct government payments to farmers over the next five to seven years." If approved, this plan would be a large part of the 1995 Farm Bill currently being crafted by Congress. "Freedom to Farm" would replace traditional farm payments with a new system of guarantees to farmers who grow feed grains, wheat, cotton and rice. Virginia raises all of these commodities except rice. Most of the feed grains, including sorghum, barley, com and soybeans, are grown east of Interstate-95, with wh...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 6 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

4 Buy a new Dodge Truck and pick up a tcai of cash. $500 CASH BACK TO FARM BUREAU'MEMBERS. As if our Magnum engine series, overall the most powerful line of truck engines on the planet, wasn't incentive enough for Farm Bureau members to buy a Dodge, now there's an extra $500 in the deal. That's $500 back on all 1995 5.9 L Magnum gas and Cummins diesel Ram regular cab pickups, plus select 1995 mid-size Dakota pickups. The offer includes all full-size 1995 Ram Van and Ram Wagon models, too. That's on top of any other national Dodge offers All you need to do is get a certificate from your state's Farm Bureau validating that you've been a member for at least thirty days. Then stop by your Dodge dealer. Where you'll discover, it pays to be in the Farm Bureau. America's Truck Stop Ijßft) The New Dodge A A DIVISION OF THE CHRYSLER CORPORATION w *This cash back offer is valid for members of participating Farm Bureaus, expires 12/31/95, and may not be used in combination with any other Chrys...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 7 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 Check how your elected officials voted on issues If you're one of the thousands ofVirginia voters who will go to the polls on Nov. 7, you'll want to be sure you're selecting the best candidate. To help you with that selection process, we're providing this record of how state lawmakers voted on agriculture-related issues. KEY Y=Yes A^Abstention N=No NV=Not Voting HB 222: Streamlines the process that farmers must go through to get a Virginia PoUution Abatement permit for confined livestock operations. Farm Bureau wanted a yes vote. HB 1073: Requires the Department of Planning and Budget to conduct an economic impact analysis of proposed regulations. Farm Bureau wanted a yes vote. HB 1288: Prohibits localities from requiring a special or conditional use permit for agriculture or forestry operations •94 HOUSE OF DELEGATES Abbtt. WatkJng M. Albo. David B. Almand, James F. Armstrong, Ward L. Baker. Thomas & Bali. Robert 8.. Sr. Barlow. William K. Behm. I...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 8 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

6 Lighter trucks may cost more WASHINGTON—The truck you buy down the road could cost an extra $2,750 and come with a less powerful engine if the U.S. Department of Transportation and some White House staffers get their way. Staffers want to force a sharp hike in light truck fuel economy—from the current 20.6 mpg to as high as 28 mpg, the same as for cars, said William H Craig Jr., "Virginia's coordinator for the Coalition For Vehicle Choice. This would take place over the next 10 years and would cover all types of light trucks, from compact to full-size pickups, as well as vans, minivans and sport-utility vehicles. U.S. Rep. Fred Upton, R-MI, and U.S. Rep. Sherrod Brown, D-OH, have introduced HR 2200, which would hold the mileage standards at the present levels for cars and light trucks. The proposed 40 percent increase in gas mileage, under the government's Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard would have major impacts, especially on rural and farm truck users, Craig said....

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 9 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1996 Horse industry is Virginia's 'sleeping giant' (Continued from Page 1) Board of Directors recently approved creation of the Equine Committee to study and promote the Commonwealth's horse industry, especially the farm-related side. A key component of the horse industry is the number of race horses born or foaled in the state, Lawrence said. The foal crop was 1,176 in 1986 and it dropped to 945 in 1988 and to 759 in 1990, Lawrence said. If s expected to be only 500 to 600 in 1995—about the same as last year's crop, he added. The foal crop will increase in Virginia because incentives for breeders in the state will get a boost, and the number of breeders in Virginia will increase. After a Virginia breeder sells a horse, the breeder receives money as the horse does well in races in other states that allow betting, Lawrence said. It's comparable to royalties an author receives for a successful book. Virginia legislation that allows betting at a horse racetrack also e...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 10 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

8 County fairs attract entertainers and large crowds By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Virginians have 40 chances each summer to experience cotton candy, thrilling rides and farm animals through local fairs. The Commonwealth offers at least one fair every weekend from June 24 until Oct 7. On some weekends in July, August and September, Virginians have a choice of three county fairs to visit. All but four of the state's 95 counties either have a county fair or share a border with one that does. A county fair does more than benefit the local economy, said Wayne "Rex" Rexrode, entertainment chairman of the Rockbridge County Regional Fair. "A fair helps draw the community together," he said. "In any community, you have divided lines—this football team versus that team, split politics and different classes of people. A fair can appeal to everybody and bring everybody together into one place." Agricultural education is another benefit, said Tom Inman, president of the Virginia Associ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 11 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 Federal money is available (Continued from Page 1) asphalt, dead trees, sand, and silt. Federal funds also will cover rebuilding of fencing and grading, shaping and releveling of cropland, as well as restoring agriculture-related structures, such as waterways, water troughs for livestock and ponds. The 11 counties are Albemarle, Amherst, Campbell, Culpeper, Greene, Halifax, Madison, Orange, Pittsylvania, Rappahannock and Rockbridge. With its extensive flood damage, Madison will receive the biggest chunk of the money—about $750,000. The funds are available to formers on a oost-share basis. The government will provide 64 percent of the funds and the former must provide 36 percent, Leggett said. On some forms, rivers carved channels through fields 15 to 20 feet deep and 30 feet wide, Leggett noted. The program, however, won't cover cases in which the cost of restoration would exceed half the value of the land, he pointed out. "I know of one farmer in Greene Count...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 12 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

8 County fairs attract entertainers and large crowds By ERIC MILLER Farm Bureau News Editor Virginians have 40 chances each summer to experience cotton candy, thrilling rides ;md farm animals through local fairs. The Commonwealth offers at least one fair every weekend from June 24 until Oct. 7. On some weekends in July, August and September, Virginians have a choice of three county fairs to visit. All but four of the state's 95 counties either have a county fair or share a border with one that does. A county fair does more than benefit the local economy, said Wayne u ßex" Rexrode, entertainment chairman of the Rockbridge County Regional Fair. "A fair helps draw the community together," he said. 'In any community, you have divided lines—this football team versus that team, split politics and different classes of people. A fair can appeal to everybody and bring everybody together into one place." Agricultural education is another benefit, said Torn Inman, president of the Virginia Ass...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 13 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 Federal money is available (Continued from Page 1) asphalt, dead trees, sand, and silt. Federal funds also will cover rebuilding of fencing and grading, shaping and releveling of cropland, as well as restoring agriculture-related structures, such as waterways, water troughs for livestock and ponds. The 11 counties are Albemarle, Amherst, Campbell, Culpeper, Greene, Halifax, Madison, Orange, Pittsylvania, Rappahannock and Rockbridge. With its extensive flood damage, Madison will receive the biggest chunk of the money—about $750,000. The funds are available to fanners on a cost-share basis. The government will provide 64 percent of the funds and the farmer must provide 36 percent, Leggett said. On some farms, rivers carved channels through fields 15 to 20 feet deep and 30 feet wide, Leggett noted. The program, however, won't cover cases in which the cost of restoration would exceed half the value of the land, he pointed out. "I know of one farmer in Greene Count...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 14 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

10 Supermarket fast food easy to prepare at home September means busier family schedules as we head back to school and work from summer vacation. Meetings and after school activities resume, leaving little time for meal preparation. Instead of being lured into the nearest fast food restaurant, take advantage of the numerous new products on the supermarket shelves designed to let you put together a fabulous meal in minutes. In the produce department, there's a great selection of new bagged salad mixes from Dole, Fresh Express and Ready Pac. These products offer a variety of greens and lettuce already washed and ready to eat. For a light main course, just add shredded reduced fat cheese, canned beans, cooked shrimp, ham or turkey from the deli, or leftover cooked poultry or beef. As a side dish, add a few chopped vegetables to the salad Fall gardening is a fun learning time with children One of the many challenges of nurturing children is to provide wholesome enjoyable activities on a...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 15 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 Looking back 50 years at U.S. involvement in World War II Fifty years ago, America was locked in a struggle unlike any before: World War 11. The Allied Powers were engaged in nothing less than a life and death struggle for their freedom and security. Totalitarian regimes intent on regional hegemony and world domina- tion posed a grave threat to all free and sovereign nations. In an extraordinary response to that threat, millions of Americans rallied both Be prepared to make right candidate choice on Nov. 7 (Continued from Page 5) ized goat milk from any and all regulations governing the production, processing and sale of grade "A" pasteurized milk. Farm Bureau wanted a no vote in the House. In the Senate Committee, the recommendation was to pass the bill by indefinitely. Farm Bureau wanted a yes vote. HB 94: Expands the definition of occupational disease to include conditions gradually incurred on account of repeated work-related trauma. The committee vote was...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 16 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

12 Four new ways to keep your money working. Choose from these four money market funds: 1 Prime Cash Series 2 Municipal (Tax-Free) Cash Series 3 Government Cash Series 4 Treasury Cash Series Keep your cash working until you need it. To help you manage your money, Farm Bureau now has the Cash Trust Series of four money market mutual funds. Each fund offers income from a different portfolio of U.S. government securities, U.S. Treasury obligations, prime commercial paper, or tax-free municipal issues. You also get these "extras" ... and more: y Unlimited checkwriting privileges (no minimum amount) ✓ No sales charge* /No redemption penalty r. . . For a tree prospectus(es) containing more complete information which you should read carefully before investing or sending money, or for yield information call 1-800-647-8053 or in MS at 1 -800-872-8514 • Investment Company Act Rule 12t>-1 allows the funds to pay fees to administrator (such as banks and brokers) to provide administra...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 17 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 Wirginia Farm Bureau is seekins ambitious, outgoing and assertive ▼ individuals who enjoy working with the public in the Multi-Line insurance sales field Income and benefits package includes: • Training Salary + Commission • Group Hospitalization and Dental • Life and Disability Insurance • 401K Plan • Unlimited Earning Potential If you would like to be a part of one of Virginia's top insurance sales teams in Auto, Home, Life and other Multi-Line products, send resume to Virginia Farm Bureau M Attn: HR-FBN 7 ,1■ P.O. Box 27552 Richmond, VA 23261 Shaw, McLeod, Belser and Hurlbutt, Inc. Forest Resource Consultants and Real Estate Brokers 6767 Forest Hill Avenue, Suite 305, Richmond, Virginia, 23225 Sfcife Comprehensive Forest Management Timber, Wildlife, Soil & Water Timber Appraisals & Sales, Assistance with Estate \ Wwßf Planning and Timber Income Tax, Forest Stewardship 11 Plans, and Other Forest Management Services 'lli WM Rural Real ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 18 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

14 THE FARMERS MARKET A Free Service to Members Classified advertising guidelines Farm Bureau Members: Non-Members: One 15-word ad per month is FREE to each Ads are 30 cents per word; $4.50 minimum member. If ad runs more than 15 words, charge (15 words). member must pay TOTAL number of words Single letters or figures and groups of figures in ad. (Example: a 15-word ad is free, a without separation count as one word, 16-word ad is $3.20, the minimum, at a hyphenated words as two. 20-cent-per-word rate.) I Payment MUST accompany order. We do not bill for classified ads. I Please type or print your ad and mail it to: Farm Bureau News classifieds, P.O. Box 27552, Richmond, VA 23261. CLASSIFIED ADS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED OVER THE PHONE. I Deadline: Ads must be received by the 15th of each month prior to the month of publication. For the combined Sept./ Oct. issue, the deadline is Aug. 15. For the Dec./ Jan. issue, the deadline is Nov. 15. Ads must be RE-SUBMITTED by the deadline for each ...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 19 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

September/October 1995 The Farmers Market (Continued from Page 14) GOVERNMENT HOMES-from $1, you repair, repossessions, delinquent tax property. Your area, 1 -800-513-4343, ext. H-20125 for current repo list. DEMONSTRATORS NEEDED-sell Christmas Around The World and decor and more. Call Gayle at 804-443-4993. HEATILATOR-drculating fireplace, good condition, perfect for new home, $100.804-565-1920, Williamsburg. TROY-BILT-rototillers, discount prices. Call Hickory Hill Nursery, 540-942-3871. WANTED-girls clothes, like new, name brand, 24 months to 2T winter, 3T summer, reasonable. 804-973-5416. SUNBURST YELLOW-handmade quilt, white shawl, crocheted coverlet. 703-456-6316. PEACH BRANDY-or tomato wine recipe, $2. S.A.S.E, to: Collins, P. O. Box 365, Tastey, Va. 23441. ARTIST-signed/numbered beach print, 10x13", $35. Petie Brigham, 509 Allison, S.W., Roanoke, Va. 24016. WANTED-kxust fence posts, need many. Call after 6 p.m. 703-347-9373. FOR SALE-organ, Conn Deluxe Rhapsody 628, with wal...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
Page 20 [Newspaper Page] — Farm Bureau News — 1 September 1995

And You Gui Choose the Program that Best Fits Your Health Insurance Needs! • Doctor Services and Office Visits • Outpatient Services • Hospitalization and Surgery • Preventive Care Medicare Supplement Plans - The coverage offered by the Farm Bureau is designed to help pay the bills not covered by Medicare. The Farm Bureau offers a variety of group insurance programs for you and your employees. You choose the level of protection that best suits your companies' needs and budget. The Farm Bureau Offers a Choice of Programs for You! Call Our Toll Free Number 1-800-229-7779 Today Find Out How the Farm Bureau Can Help Solve Your Health Care Insurance Needs Coverage not available to Virginians residing in Fairfax, Arlington, Alexandria, Vienna, and the eastern half of Fairfax County. M r ■ 1 ■ % t The Health Care programs and policies described in this ad are products of Trigon Blue Cross Blue Shield and its subsidiary X ll l\ l" 9\ health maintenance organizations. Farm Bureau Service Cor...

Publication Title: Farm Bureau News
Source: Library of Virginia
Country/State of Publication: Virginia, United States
x
Loading...
x
x