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Elephind.com contains 252,578 items from Pacific Rural Press, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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Hidden Life. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Hidden Life. Every drop of -water teemi with life. You cannot quench your thirst, oven with tho purest water without swallowing scores of puny lives. Tho ocean is stirred by the huge leviathan, who niaketh it to boil like a pot. And therein, also, in myriad varieties, aro tho lesser forms of lifo, running down to tho animalculio, so small that one hundred and fifty millions of them weigh loss than a grain ! The atmosphere is full of lifo, and tho dry land swarms with animals of unwritten names and unknown orders. They inhabit the air we breath, the water wo drink, the food we oat. They move und have their being in sweets and sours— in tho toughest flint, as well as in tho mellow pulp of the peach— in blossoms and fruit, in buds and leaves, in roots and branches, in tho bodies of animals; in our own human bodies are tiny tenants—populous colonies of little inhabitants, all too minutb to bo seen or comprehended. ***** In an office, recently, we reached a book from the shelf, and detec...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The New Erie Sleeping Coaches. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The New Erie Sleeping Coaches. The conveniences of modern travel how are they multiplying! Cars heated by hot water, lighted with gas, cushions of velvet, wills covered with oil paintings, carpets of the finest Brussels, eurtuins of tapestry, beds of curled hair, ceilings in fresco, windows of French plate glass, mirrors of the linest quality, seats of carved walnut, walls of splendidly polished hard woods, cornices lit for the finest library, hooks and handles and bars of the linest silver. Such are the appointments of the new sleeping coaches built for the Erie Railway, and which are now running between Cincinnati and New York, They call them Drawing-Boom l'alaeo Bleeping Coaches, and they uro worthy of tho name. They have the comfort of a bed chamber, the beauties of a parlor, and the capacity of a drawing-room. Tho seats are reully luxurious, covered with a species of velvet called French moijuette, of the most beautiful colors, and with medallion pattern! in the center of each ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
POPULAR LECTURES. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

POPULAR LECTURES.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Latin we Speak. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Latin we Speak. [Prof. Martin KellnftK boforo tb« MECHANIC Artb Ollxqi, Mechanics' liwtltute Hall, 8. F. Fourth Series. Beported exprewly for tin. Psxu.] Lect. 11. April 29.—Much has been said, remarked 'the lecturer, concerning the im])ortanco of tho Anglo-Saxon element of our language, and of the necessity of its study. That it is important and ought to bo studied, I fully agree; but this does not by any means imply that the classics ought to bo neglected. Proper attention should be given to both. It is my province to-night, however, to speak of the connection of Latin with our speech, and to show how largely it enters into our cvery-diiy language. Tho English language is indeed very composite. First, there is tho Celtic oloment, then that derived from the Norseman, and the Danish. A very largo 2>roportion is from the Saxon, and the Norman invasion had a great influence. But long beforo tho Norman conquest, Cajsar had over-run Great Britain, and Latin was engrafted ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Gas Wells of Erie, New York. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Gas Wells of Erie, New York. It is something worthy of extra notice, says tho Iron Age, to find a city lighted, and its dwellings warmed, with natural gas, procured merely at the same expense as boring for water. Erio rejoices in this blessing, and the subject is still sufficiently new to be interesting. The first presence of gas was noticed, four years since, in digging a potash well within the city limits, the How of gas from which nearly suffocated the workmen. This well was filled up, but the same result occurred in another near by. Experiments were then made by sinking tubes in the mud of a stream ami igniting the escaping gas, which burned freely. To a Mr. Brevillier, an intelligent German, is due the first practical action in the matter. This gentleman, associated with a few others in a company, sunk a well for petroleum on his premises; as an oil well it was a failure, but as a gas machine, a splendid success. For three years it wheezed and gas-ed until, the lease of the...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
GOOD HEALTH. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

GOOD HEALTH.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Philosophy of Drunkenness. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Philosophy of Drunkenness. A sudden mental emotion can send too much blood to the brain, or too great mental excitement does the same thing. It is the essential nature of all wines and spirits to send an increased amount of blood to the brain. The first effect of taking a glass of wine or stronger form of alcohol, is to send the blood there faster than common; hence it quickens the circulation; that gives a red face; it increases the activity of the brain, and it works faster, and so does the tongue. But as the blood goes to the brain faster than common, it returns faster, and no special permanent harm results. But supposing a man keeps on drinking, the blood is sent to the brain so much faster, in such large quantities, that in order to make room for it, the arteries have to enlarge themselves; they increase in size, and in doing so press against the more yielding flaccid veins, which carry the blood from the brain, and thus diminish their size, their bores; the result being, t...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Boiled Corn Beef. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Boiled Corn Beef. This is a staple food in a majority of families during several months of the year, and in most cases the cooking may be greatly improved. The two chief errors are, first in not cooking it long enough, and second in losing a large proportion of its real nutriment. We always prefer it prepared as follows: Soak in warm, not hot water, just long enough to take out all excess of salt. Then cover it so that the steam will condense upon the under side of the cover and fall back. This will prevent boiling away and also the loss of much of the nutriment which goes off with the steam. Boil the meat several hours or until it is so thoroughly done that it will not hold together to be lifted with a fork. If there be any bones take them out, since if cooked enough, the meat will cleave from them readily. Pack the meat by itself in a deep dish, mixing well together the lean and fat portions. Next skim the fat and boil the liquor down so that when poured over the meat it will just...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
The Uses of Walking. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

The Uses of Walking. Walking, for young and active people, is by far the best exercise; riding is good for the elderly, middle aged, and invalids. The abuse of those exercises consists in taking them when the system is exhausted more or less by previous fasting or by mental labors. Some persons injudiciously attempt a long walk before breakfast, under the belief that it is conducive to health. Others -will get up early to work three hours at some abstruse mental toi). The effect in both instances is the same; it subtracts from the power of exertion in the after part of the day. A short saunter or some light reading before this meal is the best indulgence of the kind; otherwise the waste occasioned by labor must bo supplied by nourishment, and the breakfast will necessarily become a heavy meal, and the whole morning's comfort sacrificed by a weight at the chest, from imperfect digestion of food. These observations apply especially to elderly persons, who are prone to flatter themselv...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Endurance and Diet. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Endurance and Diet. Even the experienced trainers of the prize-ring cannot decide what is the best food for training men up to their greatest powers of endurance. They have a prejudice in favor of mutton-chops and underdone beef steaks; but it is by no means sure that this is the best. The Roman soldiers—who conquered the world, and built roads from Lisbon to Constantinople, and who were all trained athletes, marching under a weight of armor and luggage that few men in our day could carry— lived on coarse, brown wheat or barley bread, which they dipped in sour wine. In our own day, the Spanish peasants are among the strongest and the most agile men in the world. They will work all day in a copper mine, or at the olive press, or the wine press, under a hot sun, and then dance half the night to the music of a guitar. What does he live on? A piece of black bread, an onion, perhaps half a watermelon. You may see him dipping his piece of bread into a horn of olive oil, and then into some...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Beneficial Results of Sunshine. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Beneficial Results of Sunshine. Seclusion from sunshine is one of the misfortunes of our civilized life. The same cause which makes the potato-vines white and sickly, when grown in the dark cellars, operates to produce the pale, sickly girls that are reared in our parlors. Expose either to the direct rays of the sun, and they begin to show color, health and strength. One of the ablest lawyers in our country —a victim of long and hard brain labor, came to me a year ago, suffering with partial paralysis. The right leg and hip were reduced in size, with constant pain in the loins. He was obliged in coming up stairs, to raise the left foot first on every stair, dragging the right one after it. Pale, feeble, miserable, he told me he had been failing several years, and closed with, "My work is done. At 60, I find myself worn out." I directed him to lie down under a large window, and allow the sun to fall upon every part of his body; at first, ten minutes a day, increasing the time until h...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Our Weekly Crop. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Our Weekly Crop. That man is a worm, and dependent to boxqi extent on his fellow worms, is an klea which seems to be indicated here and there throughout our crop this week; but that he is an industrious and a busy worm, a happy and a valuable worm, is also indicated. The growth and development of cue class of his brethren, tho Bilk Worm, is dwelt on at the commencement, and its value fully and well illustrated. Worm-like to some extent, and to sumo extent very unworm-like, we crawl through the Library of Mechanical ami Scientific Progress, spinning therefrom a rich web of thought. We devour the Alkali and investigate its properties; visit our insect brethren who dwell on the Cochineal, ami mount the Trees to Protect them from Grass-hoppers. We go to our fourfooted friends, the Hogs and Sheep; and slowly traverse the Public L:iiuls for a good place of abode. We elevate ourselves to a higher rank on hearing Right Words from the Bight Bouroe; we rejoice at finding a Crop that Never Fai...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Untitled [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

To Corkespondents.—Mr. J. A. W., of Stanislaus County, has furnished us with two timely and valuable communications on irrigation, the first of which will be given next week. We are also in receipt of some hints, etc., from " D. M. L.," of Santa Cruz.

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
California Wagons vs. Eastern Wagons. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

California Wagons vs. Eastern Wagons. One of the most important questions of the day to California, is whether her mechanics can or cannot successfully compete with the mechanics of the Atlantic States in supplying the demand of the Pacific const for farm wagon carriages and other vehicles in common use and for agricultural machines and implements generally. In considering and discussing this question we propose to do so with candor and fairness to all parties interested, acknowledging in the first place, that as Californians our interests and sympathies are strongly with the California mechanics. In a former issue of the Tress, we illustrated the Btudebaker farm wagon as a fair representative of the eastern-made wagons, now bein&imported and extensively sold on this coast. We also gave a short history of the origin and present means and facilities of that company. In a later number wo illustrated one of Soule's improved farm wagons, as made and sold by him at Sacramento...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Kind Words. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Kind Words. Interesting and Instiu-( tivk. —Mr. S. Jewett sends the following kind words from Kern county:—"l have read the "Pacific Bubal Press," regularly from its birth, and find its contents made up with original, interesting, instructive and valuable matter, suited to the wants of its readers on the Pacific Coast. If it is continued under the same auspioies, its instructions and influenoe will add knowledge and wealth of untold value to the resources of this agricultural, mechanical and golden country. It'fills a vacuum that was really needed, and it will surely prove a success." There is Need fob It. —Mr. William I'miots, an extensive gardener, near San Jose, writes as follows:—" I am a subscriber to the Bubal Pbbm, and am well pleased with the paper. lam always anxious to see the next issue, and am willing to contribute a mite, oceassionally,to add to its interest. I hope your anticipations may be more than realized, for the country is greatly in need of just such a journal a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
To the Yosemite Valley. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

To the Yosemite Valley. It is to be hoped that our Eastern friendi now in tliis city 'will not miss visiting oilier ])luc<>s than San Franoisoo. ThOM who have oome (or pleMure merely, will of course view the diilt mit scenes of natural beauty; but too many of our business visitors, strange to say, think that San Francisco is California, and that a stay here of a few days will give them a general idea of tin- State. Now no one place can represent our State with its varied climates, seasons, conditions and natural beauties and wonders. The Yosemite is one of our grand points not to be neglected, and now is ono of tho very best times to visit it. There are several ways to get there. The shortest, easiest and cheapest route is, however, this: By steamer to Stockton, by rail to Milton, by stage to Tamarack Flat via Chineso Camp and (nirote, and by saddle train (11 miles) to the Valley, A variation of this, to see the Big Trees, is to branch off from Milton by stage ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
A Printers' Cemetery. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

A Printers' Cemetery. There is a newspaper proprietor in Philadelphia, who has won a wide-spread reputation for the interest ho shows in his employes. Having himself gained a fortune, he has not thereby lost his lovo of his fel-low-men, nor has success hardened his heart against those to whom such success lias not yet como. Recognizing the truth of the principle that tho employer is under many obligations to tho employed, that no/! blessing in life is unattended with corresponding responsibilities, he gives encouragement to every honest worker and cares especially for thoso who toil for him. He provides for tho comfort and health of his workmen during their life, secures an insurance on their lives for the benefit of their families when they die, and finally has furnished a proper resting place for their bodies, when their toils and struggles on this earth havo ceased forever. This newspaper proprietor is Mr. George W. Child*, owner of the Philadelphia Public Ledger. Several years a...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Wool—Frauds Practiced. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Wool—Frauds Practiced. Thero is considerable stir in the wool market at this time, and wool growers fool much encouraged at tho extreme prices now being offered—the highest, we believe, ever paid in this State. It pays to exercise special care in putting up wool. Each fleoce should be carefully rolled and tied, and sacked in good order. Even the appearance of tho sacks sometimes affects tho price of wool, as their neatness or otherwise is thought to afford evidence of tho caro with which the wool has been grown and put up. In thin connection wo may bo pardoned for alluding to extensive frauds which are being practiced in certain quarters on innocent victims, by mixing sand with the wool in the process of packing. Ono Imyer in this city ihipped, about the first of April, two car loads of wool to Massachusetts, with instructions to have it cleansed and dried, and telegraph tho shrinkage. Tho result was a loss of just sixty-five per cent.; ton per cent, was sand, which was undoubtedly ...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Plowing Match at the State Fair. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Plowing Match at the State Fair. The State Board of Agriculture propose I to have a Plowing Match at the next State Fair. They say, as will be seen by reference to the Premium List published in our last issue that they will furnish to exhibitors suitable grounds for practically testing their plows under the direction of the awarding committeo. /.They have offered a premium of $200, being the highest premium of the entire list, by fifty dollars, for the beat steam plow, to be tested to the satisfaction of the committee, and its utility fully demonstrated. They have also offered a premium of $40 i for the best two-gang plow, and $100 more |is divided up into premiums for plows for ; general and special purposes, making the amount of cash premiums offered for plows alono $340. This is a very liberal list for the oncouragemont of good plows and good plowing, and such encouragment could not have been extended at a more appropriate time nor for a more appropriate object. The peculiar char...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
Sod Drains. [Newspaper Article] — Pacific Rural Press — 6 May 1871

Sod Drains. Our attention was lately called to a new mode of constructing drains, devised and practiced by Mr. William Fitzsimmons of Vallejo. His method of constructing drains is as follows:—The drain may be opened to a suitable depth, in the usual way> by machinery or otherwise. This done, some suitable instrument is employed to form a groove in the bottom, about four inches wide and six deep; then the sod, which should be carefully taken from the surface, is employed as a cover to the groove or drain proper, being laid on with the grass side down, and the earth afterwards filled in as usual. These drains, according to the statement of Mr. F., have been found to last well, and with very little danger of filling up or clogging. He thinks such drains will work well in tule land. They can certainly be constructed at very little cost, compared with the ordinary manner of constructing them of wood, stone or tiles. We shouid be pleased to hear from some one who has used drain...

Publication Title: Pacific Rural Press
Source: California Digital Newspaper Collection [UC Riverside]
Country/State of Publication: California, United States
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