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Title: Gilgandra Weekly Delete search filter
Elephind.com contains 17,806 items from Gilgandra Weekly, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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"ALWAYS IN THE TRENCHES." [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

"ALWAYS IN THE TRENCHES." "How many people, we wonder, who read the lengthy casualty lists in our newspapers realise what a large toll of life industry also takes year by year?" asks the "Inquirer." "The facts which Mr. John Eobertson, of Lanarkshire, gave before the Miners' Federa tion in Nottingham in respect of casualties among colliers—the lads, as. he reminded his hearers, who were ' always in the trenches'— will serve to show that commercial as well as military necessities involve a great sacri. fice of human material. "During the 15 years that have passed since the South African war, 22,000 miners alone have boen killed, and more than threes millions have been injured seriously enough to incapacitate them from work for seven i days or more. Last year, out of a total of j 800,000 employed underground, 165,000 were incapacitated for seven days or more through | accidents." | Reciprocation.—Ho: There goes the honest : est girl in the world. I She: How's that? \ He: She won't eve...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MORE OF OUR BOYS FOR THE FRONT. COLLIE ADDS TO ITS CREDIT. THREE MORE FOR THE FIRING LINE. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

COLLIE ADDS TO ITS CREDIT, THREE MORE FOR THE FIRING LINE. The consistency- witlv which the district~of Coll,ie sends its young men to take part in the great war which threatens the supremacy o£ England, and is a test of efficiency and milit ary strength for the Allies, is amongst the remarkable- -recruiting incidents in these parts. There has, in some places, been a lot of flag-flapping and beating of drums, and a lot of plat form oratory from recruiting agents, members of Parliament, and so on. The young men of Collie, backed by the patriotism and enthusiasm.of the oider residents, apparently need :o such coaxing. Probably the airy eloquence of stump orators who like to hear their own voices does not ap peal to them in the same way as their personal convictions of the war and its consequences. Quite unosten tatiously they step out of the home and farm life and join the ranks. Week by week they are going—men who have grown up with each other ; some who for years have been com panio...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECALLED AMBASSADORS. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

RECALLED AMBASSADORS. The first rule, of an. ambassador's office is 'that he shall' abstain from all interference in 'the affairs of the country in which he is liv ing. Lord Lyons it, was, one fancies, who boasted that he had been able to preserve this rule in the United States by refraining strict ly from making any speeches. But :the ap pearance of the reporter brought fresh diffi culties, and an ,incautious expression of opinion on' an internal matter by one of England's representatives in recent years procured his recall. In English diplomacy the best known case is that <of Bulwer at Madrid, which may be quoted as a sample of the treatment which American newspapers would like to see meted out to Dr. Dumba. Bulwer, by order, trans mitted to the Spanish Government in 1848 an impertinent despatch in which the actions of the Spanish Government were strongly critic ised. Bulwer received a reply, stating, among other things, "Your conduct in the execution of your important ...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
OUR HEARTIEST THANKS. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

OUR HEARTIEST THANKS. ''Nothing can now prevent the nation get ting the men it needs," says the ''Specta tor." "That is our message to the German Government. Their Zeppelins and their in vasion of Servia have made it certain that the drafts for our overseas army shall never fail. We tender them our heartiest thanks." She Knew Him.—Hub: One night while you were away I heard a burglar. You should have seen me going downstairs three steps at a time. • Wife (who knows him): Where was he, on the roof?—Boston Transcript.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS. I A hint as* to what the Germans mean by . the 11 Freedom of the Seas " was contained in a statement made some time ago by the German Imperial Chancellor, that <f the peace for which we are striving will guarantee to all nationalities the freedom of the oceans, and will offer possibilities to every nation of serving in the work of progress and civilisa tion, by means of a free world-wide com. merce." Germany, who has spent about one and one-half billion dollars in creating;,..her fleet and its accessories, has found that this fleet is unable to protect its merchant marine, with the result that the German exports and imports amounting in the total to some five billions of dollars annually, have practically ceased, the ships of her vast merchant marine being denied the "Freedom of the Seas." The question arises, had the conditions been reversed and had the German fleet possessed the preponderance over the Allies' fleet which, 'the enemy now holds, w...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
NEW NERVES WHILE YOU WAIT. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

NEW NERVES WHILE YOU WAIT. A Norwegian doctor named Ingebrigsten has sueceded in transplanting nerves from one animal to another. Tlyis undoubtedly opens up a great future for the human race. To have your nervous system quietly and. skilfully removed by competent mechanics, and a brand-new one put in its place while you wait; ought to create a revolution in all homes. The ordinary nervous system is good for about seven years. At the end of that time it becomes very much like the plumbing in a suburban residence at the end of the same period. It has lost its vivacity. It rattles a good deal. Under the new system, how ever, our nervous systems can be continually renewed. We shall be able, doubtless, to buy nerve fibre by the yard, and our chauffeur can jack us up once a week and supply the worn out parts by the skilful manipulation of an electric bulb and a set of nerve irons.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
"FOUNDER OF THE GERMAN NAVY." GRIM STORY OF BRITISH DIPLOMACY. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

—T ~7\f * "FOUNDER OF THE GERMAN } )g NAVY." GRIM ST^RY OF BRITISH DIPLOMACY. In his aufSbiography just published; Lord Eedesdai^i^|^lains how England, by refusing to intervention Denmark's behalf against the German grttb at Schleswig-Holstein, enabled Germany to -build the Kiel Canal. Says- a reviewer:-—-/ "Lo^\ Palmers ton, then Prime Minister, exposed clearly enough the objects and ten dency of Prussian- policy. - In. the House of Coiiimons he stated:, in 1863; in answer to a question':— There is no use disguising the fact that what is: at the bottom of the German de- • sign and the desire of connecting Sehles wig with Holstein, is the dream of a "Ger man fleet, and-the wish to get Kiel as a German seaport. That may be a good reason why they should wish it, but it is no reason why they should' violate the rights and independence of Denmark for an object which, even if it were aecom I plished, would not realise the expectation, of those who aim at it. "And he proceeds to indicate ...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
At Home and Abroad. GOING FOR MORE. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

GOING FOB Partners, mostly' in the /Riverina and Albury districts, are /Baking a fnrtber.-claim on the Government over and above 5a a bnshel paid them under the Wheat Acquisition^ Act of last year. If the claim is acceded to it "will increase tlie indebtedness - of' the board by £10,COO. )

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
BIG WHEAT FIGURES. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

BIG WHEAT FIGURES. Up to last Satui'day there -were 140,849 bags of wheat stacked at the Genrie -station, -wlfile 39,790 bags have been despatched, making a total of ISO,639.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
RECRUITS OF ASIATIC ORIGIN [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

RECRUITS OF ASIATIC OR^GfN It is now announced, as the result of questions that have been raised, , that the Defence Depaitment has given a definite ruling on the subject of alien enlistment to the effect that, jthe acceptance of men for the- Aus j tralian Army will be limited to psr j sons of European origin. Consequent ly men of Asiatic origin, though born : in Australia, will not be eligible for ! service. Some have already been ! drafted into the forces, but it is the wish of the Defence Department that no more shall be enlisted.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE PRISONER. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

THE PRISONER. When the officer of the day entered the guardroom he found it empty, save for a pri vate, who, airily attired in his shirt sleeves, ■was lounging on a chair, puffing a short clay pipe. "Where's the sergeant of the guard?" demanded the officer angrily. '1 Gone across1 to the mess to have a drink, sir," replied the private, saluting smartly. "And the sen tries?" "In the canteen, sir." "Then confound it, what are you doing here?"" "Me, sir?" was the calm reply. "I'm the prisoner!"

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TENNIS AS COMPARED TO GOLF. California Professional Tennis Instructor. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

TENNIS AS COMPARED TO GOLF. By DWIGHT DOUGLASS, California Professional Tennis Instructor. Until one really considers the matter, ten uis and golf seem to have much, in common. Each is played with an elastic ball and a hit ting instrument, and each is enjoyed by both ladies and gentlemen. There ijB|;a drive in tennis and a drive in golf; a follow-through in tennis and a follow-through in golf. In each the eye must be kept on the ball. Coun try clubs feature both tennis and golf. Mag azines group the two games. The phrase "tennis and golf' is met eveyrwhere. It is, therefore, not to be wondered at that amateur players and authors of books of instruction on tennis should drift into the common delusion that the tennis and golf drives are niade on, the same principle, and that the follow-through in tennis should in all respects be patterned after the follow through in golf. Now, it is well established that in golf the head of the club should meet the ball'squarelyjj should follow direct...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FEDERATION WHEAT [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

FEDERATION .WHEAT ■A - - Messrs. T, J. and J. Fitzpatrick, Erin Vale, Junee, give the following as an instance of the wisdom of sow ing pure Federation : "This season we sowed an area of S000 acres with pure graded Federation (fortunately saved previous to the drought). This is now being harvested, yield ing np to 42 bushels per acre, and we expect an average of 40, bush els from this area. Lower grades of Feder ation(which we were compelled to use), although returning well, fall far short of the aveiage of the pure seed, although the soil and climatic conditions are the same. It will pay farmers every time to procure the purest seed wheat—the product of prolific, crops. This is a point often neglected, though emphasised by plant breeders. A substantial saving in seed is effected and. the ex tra yield will pay handsomely."

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
IN THE BALKANS. CAN ALLIES HOLD ON? WHERE ROUMANIA AND GREECE STAND. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

W THE# > j if CAN ALLIES HOLD ON? WHERE ROUMANIA AND GREECE STAND. U><1A fierce fight is now waging for the con trol of that vital corridor or bridge, which leads from the German lands to,|||pnstanti nople, via Servia. ' German troops pour down from the north— Bulgarian troops stab traitorously on the east —Allied troops hurry to the rescue from Sal onica! Can we hold the Balkans and thus prevent the Germans from getting more men from Bulgaria, and prevent the re-arming of the Turks? And what may we expect of Greece and Roumania—who, for the moment, are out of the fray? ROAD TO CONSTANTINOPLE. "The German attempt to open the road from Berlin to Constantinople presents great and unexpected dangers to us in Egypt, in Persia, and in India!" says the "Times." '' And we firmly beileve that, with the help the Allies can give the Servians, whose mag nificent gallantry is exciting the admiration of the world, the attempt to win the East is doomed to failure.'' DO NOT BE ALA...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CORRESPONDENCE (To the Editor). [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

CORRESPONDENCE __——— (To the Editor), Sir,—I wish to direct the atten tion of farmers who had wheat seiz ed under the Wheat Acquisition Act. to the recent decision in the appeal ctises whereby they.will bo paid an extra threepence per bushel, provid ed they had made no previous con tract for the sale at less than five shillings—the price at Which the Government seized it. Forms may be procured ou application to theN "Secretary, Wheat Acquisition Board, box 1488, G.P.O. Sydney." These forms will only be issued dir ect to farmers—an application by the J1, and S. Association for a supply for distribution having been refused. The forms must be lodged not later than the 29th inst., so far mers would be well advised to attend to the matter at once. . - Yours, etc., EDWIN TOWNSEND.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MAKE FRANCE KNOWN. AN APPEAL TO AUSTRALIA. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

MAKE FRANCE KNOWN. AN APPEAL TO AUSTRALIA. The following was written, by a French nurse (a girl of 20) t'o a schoolmistress in. Sydney, who is a compatriot, and who has m? le the acquaintance of the writer of the letter on a visit to France:— Sept. 18, 1915. My dear, dear friend,—Your touching letter made us cry. . . How near I feelyou to me, through the love' you bear to my beloved France. Oh, I am very proud of you, my friend, and very grateful for all that you are doing for my country. There are things which can never be forgotten. You are at the other end of the world, and yet you have taken a more active part in the war than many people who are quite near the battle, ground. Oh, continue,'*" continueto make France loved over there in your distant coun try, for she has been so slandered by the Germans; it is time now that the truth should shine out. Tell them—your little pupils,, everyone you see—what the real soul of France is like, that hid itself at times, be cause she was to...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
P. AND A. ASSOCIATION. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

P. AND A. ASSOCIATION. The following are the new officials ©f the Gilgandra P awd A Associa tion Vice-Presidents : Messrs R Stauley, A F .Garling and W Barrel!. Committee : Messrs A Rogers, J C JSlsom, W Pridd'ie, W O Rolls, H Stockings, A A "Wilson, Barber, R M Diggs, J J O'Brien, A P Ray nor, W A Craig. T Watt, Moad, Wheat ley, Barling, W Pagan, G Stockings, 33onnington, W A Barden, Lnmmis, Roach, McKellar, Cassidy, M'Kech.. nie, A Richaras, E Diggs, G Skin ner, P J Anderson, J GPCnrran, J Bobiiison.

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
HOW WE PERSPIRE. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

HOW WE PERSPIRE. Perspiration passes out through the skin by means of the sudoriferous, or sweat-glands. That, until recent years, told the whole story. But it is now known that water-vapor passes through the substance of the skin itself, in dependently of aiiy secretion of these glands. ' •'Insensible'' perspiration has long been re cognised, but it was'generally thought to be the j vaporisation of liquid secretion too slight to V. be noticed'. It-is', doubtless this in partj^fc^f recent discoveries show- that in most of it iIp1' the vapor has never condensed on the skin, and is not "sweat" at all, if this term is to be confined to the secretions of the sweat ,glands- The curious freak that led to the possibility of this demonstration was the ex istence^bf persons without any sweat-glands at persons nevertheless, 1'perspired'* continuousiy^thpiagh never in sensible drops, and it was possible to*' measure the amount of water ;tlfat passed through the skin in the form of vapour. We q...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
ODD ELECTRICAL HEATING SYSTEM FOR HOMES. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

ODD ELECTRICAL HEATING SYSTEM FOR HOMES. A Swedish inventor has devised a most unique system of electrical heating for houses of from four to ten rooms, and which is espe cially intended for localities where electric current is inexpensive. The system consists of two tanks, a motor-driven rotary pump, and the necessary radiators and piping. One of the tanks is placed in the attic of the house and is thermally insulated. In it are placed the heating units which, normally, are only operate^! at night when the rates for electric current are low. In the morning the heating units are disconnected from the supply ' circuit and the motor.driven pump started. The water flows down the piping and through the radiators by the force of gravity, and is collected in a receiving tank in the basement, from where it is pumped I out and returned to the tank in the attic. It is claimed that the cost of heating a house | Dy this system is about 12 cents per room with a current rate of one cent per k.w....

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A FEW NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF BOOKKEEPING. [Newspaper Article] — Gilgandra Weekly — 11 February 1916

A FEW NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF BOOKKEEPING. Practically from the dawn of civilisation merchants have been carrying on business, yet it was not until the thirteenth century that any effort, however rudimentary, was made to - systematise the method of keeping the ac countsyof; commercial ventures. Even then the ; records were not kept in books, but on a ( series of detached memoranda, and as in those j days there was no continuity of trading, se parate accounts were kept of eacfy venture un tiL: its end, when the^jbalance of'v'ihe account | was'"closed by a transfer to profit or loss, as , the case may be. j 1494 the first^gatisejon. bookkeeping was f i published at Ve^^ie^'the'^Sl'thor being a friar I named Luc a Paci$f§, a famous mathematician,, i who probably ^gained his commercial know ledge in his sphere as tutor to the sons of one of the merchaH#princes of Venice. It is interesting to note that of the three books advocated by Pacioli, viz., memorial, journal, and ledger, the two ...

Publication Title: Gilgandra Weekly
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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