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Elephind.com contains 248,232 items from World's News, The, samples of which are listed below. All items from this newspaper title are freely available and can be searched from the search box above. You may also search the entire collection of 2,949 newspaper titles in Elephind.com.
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STRONG MEDICINE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

STRONG MEDICINE. Doctor: "Why, be seems worse. Did you give him plenty of strong food, as I told you?" Mrs. O'Looney: "Yes, sir. Onions twice a day, sir."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
POOR PUSSIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

POOR PUSSIES. Little Girl (on steamer): "Oh, mother, what are those?" Mother; "They are porpoises, my dear." Little Girl: "Oh, mother, do ask the sailors to catch me a little poor kitten."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
WHERE FATHER WAS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

WHERE FATHER WAS. Two little girls accompanied their father into the fields. Becoming weary of watching the monotony of ploughing, they sought shelter be- hind a hedge. "Come," said the elder to the younger, "let me teach you your prayers. Say 'Our Father.' " "Our Father," repeated the younger. "Who art in Heaven." "No he ain't, Bessie, he's over in that field, ploughing."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CONTRIBUTED ITEMS. AUSTRALIAN VERSUS BOER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

CONTRIBUTED ITEMS. AUSTRALIAN VERSUS BOER. Just before the present war in South Africa ready money was rather a scarce commodity with the Boers, most of the barter being done by sheep and cattle. An Australian contractor was engaged by a Boer to build a house. When the work was completed, the burgher in- quired of the builder whether he was willing to accept part payment in cash and part in sheep, valued at 20s each. The Cornstalk agreed to the proposal, and valued his work at so much cash and 100 sheep. Shortly afterwards, desiring to leave the dis-     trict, he sold the sheep for 18s each. His mate remarked: "You lost 2s a head by that trans- action." "No," said he, "I gained 8s on each. I valued the sheep at 10s a head, and charged accordingly."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
TRINIDAD'S ASPHALT. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

TRINIDAD'S ASPHALT. —♦— Tbe principal deposit of asphalt in the island of Trinidad is at Le Brea, where there is an ap- parently inexhaustible supply. The pitch lake is 110 acres in extent, of unknown depth, and situated 130ft. above the level of the sea. The removal of 1,720,000 tons during the past 34 years has apparently made no impression on the lake. The lake contains no liquid asphalt, but in other parts of the island the kind from which il- luminating and lubricating oils can be distilled is found widely distributed. Glance pitch, also found in the island, is used for electric insulations and for black varnishes.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Advertising [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

FACES MADE LOVELY by CREMODERMA, the GREAT FRECKLE CURE. Removes all Disfigurements. Cures Eczema and all Skin Diseases. 1/ and 2/6. By post from Chief Depot, A. KING, Chemist, Gurner-st., Paddington: 1/3 stamps, and 3/. Obtainable all Chemists.—Advt.  

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
FIFTY-MILE FLASH. COMING REVOLUTION IN MILITARY SIGNALLING. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

FIFTY-MILE FLASH.   COMING REVOLUTION IN MILI- TARY SIGNALLING. Promises of a revolution in military signalling are held out as the result of experiments under War Office authority. Lieutenant Arbuthnot, of the Scots Guards, hinted at the new departure in a recent speech to volunteer signallers of the Home District, but as to details secrecy is still observed. The apparatus which finds most favor at pre- sent, however, is a lamp for burning acetylene gas, invented by Lieutenant Reid, of the 1st London Volunteer Engineers. Illumination equal in power to the concentrated light of 175 candles is derived from acetylene gas, enough of which to last for three hours of continuous signalling can be carried in a cylinder containing no more than one gallon of water. Where constant water supply is at hand, the light can be kept going, if necessary, from sunset to daybreak. The chief peculiarity of this generator is the novel method by which calcic carbide and water "commix and com...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
A CONSIDERATE WIFE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

A CONSIDERATE WIFE.   She (who has been out shopping, to her hus- band, who is uncomfortably conscious of the fact): "Horatio, dear, don't you see Mrs. Parker over the way? "Why don't you take off your hat?" —"Punch." Dentistry is now an accepted and often flourishing profession of women in France. In a country town of Seine-et-Marne a qualified young lady dentist enjoys the monopoly of tooth-drawing, a dentist's business in pro- vincial France consisting of little else. French country folks, even of the wealthier sort, rarely, if ever, indulge in a set of false teeth.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
Their Night Out. STAMPEDE OF CONTINGENT HORSES. THE BOLT DOWN KING-STREET. A SENSATIONAL CHARGE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

Their Night Out STAMPEDE OF CONTINGENT HORSES. THE BOLT DOWN KING-STREET. A SENSATIONAL CHARGE. The Charge of the Light Brigade, immortalised by Tennyson, was as nothing to the wild, weird scene of excitement one night a week ago, caused by the stampede of some 200 horses from the Commonwealth Contingent Camp, at Moore Park. Nobody knows exactly how they got away. No- body ever does in these cases. It is wiser not to. The horses had been released to loll or roll about, and finding a somewhat easy exit, made a dash for liberty. They can't be charged with breaking camp, or desertion, or any of those delightful little crimes so dear to the disciplinarian. So once they got their heels and a free head they had a really good night out. Some of them did not go home till morning. Some have not gone home yet. Had the whole mob decided on one mad charge in the same direction the consequences must have been very serious. As it was, some turned city- ward, others went for the suburbs, and alto-...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Royal Quarrel in Holland. WHAT REALLY TOOK PLACE. PRINCE HENRY FLIRTS WITH THE QUEEN MOTHER. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

The Royal Quarrel in Holland. WHAT REALLY TOOK PLACE. PRINCE HENRY FLIRTS WITH THE QUEEN MOTHER. "I received yesterday" (writes a correspondent of "Modern Society") "a visit from a square and   free-speaking old Dutch gentleman of the first nobility, well en cour, and whom I at once began to question about the recent events in the Palace of Queen Wilhelmina. He shrugged his shoul- ders and said: 'We all know that there is some- thing, but we do not know yet exactly what that something may be. The only thing we know for certain is that our Consort is a rough German trooper who behaves exactly as we expected him to do, but the question remains open. So it is wise to wrap the whole affair in mystery so as to set to work the busybodies all over the country, and even all over Europe.' " 'At any rate,' I remarked, 'he fought two duels, and this is the most compromising thing when a woman is in question, and a thousand times more so when the woman is a Queen.' The Dutchman lau...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE SPEEDY GREYHOUND. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE SPEEDY GREYHOUND. —♦— A correspondent says that as the result of ex- periments he has made under careful timing he finds that the greyhound is the fastest of all four footed animals. When going at full gallop it can cover 20 yards a second, or about a mile in a minute and 28 seconds—a speed that comes very near that of a carrier pigeon. There are few thoroughbred horses that can exceed 19 yards a second. Greyhounds have been known to better that by four yards. Foxhounds have a record of four miles in six minutes and a half, or nearly 18 yards a second. This speed is to some extent an inherited gift, as wolves can run at the rate of a mile in three minutes. Nansen says that Sibe- rian dogs can travel 45 miles on ice in five hours.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE. OF PUPIL TEACHERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE. OF PUPIL TEACHERS. Here are some answers given recently by   certain pupil teachers in an examination in geo-   graphy (says the writer of Sub Rosa in the   "Morning Leader").   "Stanley was the man who about the year 1490 sailed across to Africa with the idea of exploring   the wilds of Africa. He gave his name to the   Stanley Falls on the Congo, and explored Victoria Nyanza after Speke founded it. Living- stone explored also in Africa, and he, like   Stanley, founded some falls which he named the   Livingstone Falls, about 1550."   The dates are a bit out here, for, whenever   these journeyings and discoveries took place, it is   surely incorrect to represent Stanley as having   gone out to Africa 60 years before Livingstone.   Stanley went out after Livingstone—using the word "after" as me...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
CHRISTMAS AND ROYALTIES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

CHRISTMAS AND ROYALTIES. Christmas has been a notable period in the   lives of English Sovereigns. Henry VI. selected   the Christmas week of 1429 as the auspicious   date of his coronation. He was crowned in Paris   by Cardinal Beaufort. It was on a bitterly cold   day—three days before the Christmas of 1330—   that Queen Isabella was sent to her long im-   prisonment. On the Christinas Eve of 1647 the   great row between Parliament and King Charles came to a head, which resulted in his signing a secret treaty with the Scots and in allegiance to him being renounced by the English Parliament, and it was two days before Christmas on the fol- lowing year that he was taken under guard to Windsor. The second Civil War was flourishing, and what a Christmas it must have been in many homes! It was during Christmas week of 1653 that Oliver Cromwell became Lord Protector, and it was on Box...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
THE GRAMAPHONE. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

THE GRAMAPHONE. The old idea of combining the phonograph and   cinematograph go as to represent speaking as   well as moving figures, for example, scenes on   the stage, has been carried out by M. Clermont-   Huet, whose "Diocinescope audiphone" by means   of the gramaphone supplies the song, dialogue, etc., appropriate to the "living picture."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
AMERICAN MALES. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

AMERICAN MALES. Comparison between the latest British and American census statistics discloses a remark- able difference in the numbers of the males and females that made up the population of the re- spective countries. In Britain, it will be remem- bered, the female portion of the population were in numbers at least by far the more numerous section, but in America this state of affairs is reversed, the men and boys outnumbering the women and girls by 1,800,000 in a population of 76,303,387. The excess appears more distinctly, perhaps, when it is said that there are 512 males and only 488 females in every 1000 people in the United States.

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
MISTOOK THE FLAVOR. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

MISTOOK THE FLAVOR.   "Is this heaven's bliss that I taste?" cried the   ecstatic lover, as he pressed his lips to her     cheek.     "No," said the innocent young thing, "that's     sachet powder."

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
JACK AT THE WAR. STORY OP A SAILORMAN. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

JACK AT THE WAR.   STORY OF A SAILORMAN. We have beard a good deal about the soldiers in the present war. Little has, however, been said about the sailors. Jack, however—mer- chant Jack—is "doing his bit" towards cement- ing the two former Republics into the British Empire. There are numbers of old seamen scattered all over Africa. A good percentage of these men have at different times left their ships, lured away by the glowing reports of the money to be picked up on the fields. Many of them have done well for themselves, for the sailorman is handy at turning his hand to any- thing that comes along. CAME IN SHOALS. When the war broke out these men came in in shoals and offered their services. There is one thing the average sailor cannot as a rule do, however, and this is ride a horse. At the first outbreak of hostilities most of the corps formed in the colony were mounted ones, but after a short time foot corps, pioneers, and railway guards were formed, and the sailors...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
DOUBLE TRAGEDY. GUARDSMAN AND WIFE SHOT DEAD. BACK FROM THE WAR TO DIE ON HAMPSTEAD HEATH. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

DOUBLE TRAGEDY.             GUARDSMAN AND WIFE SHOT DEAD. —♦— BACK FROM THE WAR TO DIE ON HAMPSTEAD HEATH. Shortly after three o'clock on the afternoon of December 20th, a double tragedy was discovered to have been committed on Hampstead Heath. A little boy named Quirk, while passing the Six Larches—a portion of the heath near the Golder's- hill Convalescent Home—noticed a soldier and a young woman lying on the ground near to one another. He at once gave information to one of the County Council constables, whose box stood close to the spot, and the constable on com- ing up found the man and woman stretched out on the ground quite dead, with blood about their faces and wounds in their heads. By their side lay a pistol. The man was wearing the uniform of the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards. He was about 5ft. 8in. or 5ft. 9in. in stature, slight, and very young. The girl had got on a short green jacket, with ...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
SHIP-BUILDING FOR FOREIGN POWERS. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

SHIP-BUILDING FOR FOREIGN   POWERS.   —♦—   "Engineering," in reviewing the warship building of the past year, says that one regret- table feature is the diminution of warships built in this country for foreign Powers. For several years this has been a decreasing quantity, and this year only torpedo-boat craft fail to be included; the tonnage (2442 tons) is almost inappreciable when compared with the 50,000 and 60,000 tons of past years. The vessels included this year, built by Yarrow, Thorney- croft, and Laird, are principally for Japan; at the present moment there are practically no large ships building for foreign navies. Various reasons account for this; but it can scarcely be said that it is due to inability, either from the point of view of experience or pres- sure of other work in our ship-builders' yards. One finds, rather, adds "Engineering," political influence a greater factor than either reputation or economy: the various Powers who...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
The Devil's Playground. A WILD SPOT IN CANADA. [Newspaper Article] — The World's News — 8 February 1902

The Devil's Playground. A WILD SPOT IN CANADA.   —♦—     The terrible accident that happened to a Canadian Pacific train on December 7, when a   locomotive and several freight cars leaped 360ft. into the waters of the Fraser River, has de-   termined the Canadian authorities to see if some safeguard against such accidents in future is   not possible. The accident occurred in the wildest part of the mountain section, known as the   Devil's Playground, east of the town of Lytton, in British Columbia. The railway, as will   be seen from our sketch, runs along a ledge of the Fraser River Canyon, the river being hun-   dreds of feet below, and cliffs and mountains towering above. A landslip is believed to have   been the primary cause of the accident, by which the unfortunate driver and stoker lost their   lives.     &...

Publication Title: World's News, The
Source: Trove [National Library of Australia]
Country/State of Publication: NSW, Australia
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